Comics as COVID-19 Response: Now Deposited ‘Green’ Open Access

Art by Peter Wilkins; Editing by Ernesto Priego (2020)
Art by Peter Wilkins; Editing by Ernesto Priego (2020) https://doi.org/10.25383/city.12348959.v1

 

Unfortunately it’s not always possible to publish all of one’s academic work as open access versions of record. In those cases the least one can do in my opinion is ensure one keeps one’s copyright and that the publisher allows legal self-archiving without an embargo. (If in doubt, check before submitting: https://v2.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/).

My article with Peter Wilkins, “Comics as COVID-19 Response: Visualising the Experience of Video-conferencing with Ageing Relatives” was published on Friday June 12 2020 in the COVID-19 response blog section of ACM Interactions Magazine (see our announcement on this blog here).

We are pleased the article will also be featured in the print version of the magazine in the June-July issue. Once again our gratitude to the editors!

ACM Interactions is published bi-monthly by the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) and the licensing agreement allows for Green Open Access without embargo.

We have deposited the accepted manuscript (adding an abstract to facilitate discovery and archiving) in City Research Online and can be downloaded from https://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/24428/

The comic we discussed was published open access on figshare as

Wilkins, Peter; Priego, Ernesto (2020): A Comic Visualising the Experience of Video-conferencing with Aging Parents During the COVID-19 Pandemic. City, University of London. Figure. https://doi.org/10.25383/city.12348959.v1

The published version of the article is online at at https://interactions.acm.org/blog/view/comics-as-covid-19-response-visualizing-the-experience-of-videoconferencing.

We did explore getting the funding to pay for the Open Access option at the ACM, but since ACM Interactions is not a peer reviewed publication and the cost is far from negligible we decided to be strategic in this instance and save the funds for, hopefully, a future peer-reviewed publication, if need be.

The path towards wider fully-fledged openness in research is a long and convoluted one. It shouldn’t have to be.

#IGNCC20 Workshop Materials: Ambiguity, Empathy and Narrative Co-Design: The User Experience of Reading Dementia Care Comic

IGNCC20 conference banner

Our synchronous workshop at the International Graphic Novels and Comics Conference was hosted synchronously yesterday Thursday 2 July 2020, Session T7, 16:00hrs BST in the (online) conference Room 2.. We have included all the relevant information below.

The session was hosted live via the conference Blackboard Collaborate videoconferencing platform. It was free and required no previous registration. The Twitter hashtags for our session were  #IGNCC20 #woripr.

About 33 international participants attended and the discussion via video and voice and as text via the chat was very lively and interesting. Thank you everyone who attended and for your feedback and to the chairs and organisers for their very hard work.

The materials can be downloaded and cited via figshare as:

Priego, Ernesto; Grennan, Simon; Wilkins, Peter (2020)  Workshop: Ambiguity, Empathy and Narrative Co-Design: The User Experience of Reading Dementia Care Comic. University of the Arts London. Conference contribution. https://doi.org/10.25441/arts.12579731.v1
The workshop concluded by giving some ‘homework’ to those participants wishing to try it out. You can find it in the slides we shared on figshare (link above). No need to have attended the synchronous session to try it out!

Full conference information including programme: https://internationalgraphicnovelandcomicsconference.com/igncc-2020/

 

Modern Times: A Quick Note on Editorial and Peer Review Work in Accelerated Publish-or-Perish Academic Cultures

Les temps modernes, by Pierre Metivier.  CC BY-NC
Les temps modernes, by Pierre Metivier. CC BY-NC

As the Editor-in-Chief of The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship I receive via email the author queries sent via the journal’s contact form. The most frequent query is about the time it takes to get a decision and get published. It is quite telling about current academic publishing cultures that the how-soon-can-I-expect-to-get-published query outnumbers by far any queries seeking clarifications on the journal’s scope, peer review processes or journal guidelines.

Given that only today I received three different queries on the same subject, I’ve decided to document here a summary of my own personal editorial position on article processing times, and therefore on what I believe should ideally motivate authors to submit to the journal.

At The ComicsGrid, the estimated processing times information is publicly available in the relevant section in the journal at https://www.comicsgrid.com/about/submissions/. Hopefully that section provides enough information.

It’s worth saying again that processing times depend on a variety of factors (quality of the submission, adherence to guidelines, availability of peer reviewers, availability of editors, availability of authors to do revisions, copyediting, proofing; workload of typesetters and manuscript layout complexity, etc). These factors play out on an ad hoc basis and cannot be easily predicted nor guaranteed.

In my own editorial experience, the submissions to The Comics Grid that are more likely to get accepted relatively more quickly tend to be those that are submitted to the journal motivated by an interest in contributing relevant content to the journal, rather than those that are submitted under pressure or somehow motivated by an expectation of faster processing times.

As a researcher myself I totally understand and empathise with the pressures imposed by a publish-or-perish academic culture. Also as a researcher, I do fully understand the frustration that review and editorial decision waiting times can cause.

As both researchers and editors, the editorial team and pool of reviewers always-already aim for a professional, efficient, fair and relatively rapid peer review process, but this ‘rapidity’ is indeed relative and variable. However, we at The Comics Grid do seek to collaboratively develop a peer-reviewed journal where articles can be carefully, expertly and fairly considered. Apart from the required expertise, the main necessary resource to achieve that goal successfully is, I’m afraid, time.

We are very grateful to all authors who have considered The Comics Grid for a future submission.

In ACM Interactions Magazine: Comics as COVID-19 Response: Visualising the Experience of Video-conferencing

Art by Peter Wilkins; Editing by Ernesto Priego (2020)
Art by Peter Wilkins; Editing by Ernesto Priego (2020) https://doi.org/10.25383/city.12348959.v1

I am very happy to share that my article with Peter Wilkins, “Comics as COVID-19 Response: Visualising the Experience of Video-conferencing with Ageing Relatives” was published yesterday in ACM Interactions Magazine at https://interactions.acm.org/blog/view/comics-as-covid-19-response-visualizing-the-experience-of-videoconferencing.

ACM Interactions is published bi-monthly by the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), the largest educational and scientific computing society in the world. Interactions is the flagship magazine for the ACM’s Special Interest Group on Computer-Human Interaction (SIGCHI), with a global circulation that includes all SIGCHI members. We are honoured our article (and comic!) will also appear in the print version of the magazine.

We worked on this article in response to the magazine’s Responding to the COVID-19 pandemic invitation.

I’d like to extend my gratitude to Alex Taylor, Daniela Rosner, Mikael Wiberg and John Stanik.

The comic we discuss in the article can be viewed, downloaded, shared and cited from figshare as:

Wilkins, Peter; Priego, Ernesto (2020): A Comic Visualising the Experience of Video-conferencing with Aging Parents During the COVID-19 Pandemic. City, University of London. Figure. https://doi.org/10.25383/city.12348959.v1

The Lockdown Chronicles 40: Daniel

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Daniel tweets a thread.
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A Journal of the Plague Year by Daniel Defoe (1660–1731) was first published in March 1722. It is an account of one man’s experiences of the year 1665, in which the bubonic plague struck the city of London in what became known as the Great Plague of London [Wikipedia entry].

Text sources: BBC News (23 March 2020) “PM announces strict new curbs on life in UK”; BBC News (11 June 2020) “Coronavirus: Growing calls for government to scrap 2m rule”; Defoe, D. (1722) A Journal of the Plague Year: being observations or memorials, of the most remarkable occurrences, as well publick as private, which happened in London during the last great visitation in 1665. Written by a citizen who continued all the while in London. Never made publick before, via Project Gutenberg.

Source image: Portrait of Daniel Defoe, National Maritime Museum, London, author unknown, style of Sir Godfrey Kneller. Image in the public domain in its country of origin and other countries and areas where the copyright term is the author’s life plus 70 years or fewer, via Wikimedia Commons.
This comic strip CC-BY-NC-SA.

References

Gov.uk. Coronavirus (COVID-19) in the UK, available at https://coronavirus.data.gov.uk [Accessed 11 June 2020]

BC News. (23 March 2020) “PM announces strict new curbs on life in UK”. Available at https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-52012432 [Accessed 11 June 2020].

BBC News (11 June 2020) “Coronavirus: Growing calls for government to scrap 2m rule”. Available at https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-53003046 [Accessed 11 June 2020].

Defoe, D. (1722) A Journal of the Plague Year: being observations or memorials, of the most remarkable occurrences, as well publick as private, which happened in London during the last great visitation in 1665. Written by a citizen who continued all the while in London. Never made publick before. Available via Project Gutenberg at https://www.gutenberg.org/files/376/376-h/376-h.htm [Accessed 11 June 2020]

Barbican Living (n.d.) Daniel Defoe (1660 – 1731). Available at https://www.barbicanliving.co.uk/blocks/defoe-house/daniel-defoe-1660-1731/ [Accessed 11 June 2020]

Portrait of Daniel Defoe, National Maritime Museum, London, author unknown, style of Sir Godfrey Kneller. Via Wikimedia Commons at https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Daniel_Defoe_Kneller_Style.jpg Accessed 11 June 2020]

The Lockdown Chronicles is a series of periodical comic strips made at night (in candlelight!) adapting and reusing openly-licensed or public domain items from online digital collections. Publication and tweetage are scheduled in advance. Historical sources are adapted and updated for the current pandemic; please refer to each strip’s references on each post for further context.  Catch up with the series at https://epriego.blog/tag/the-lockdown-chronicles/.

The Lockdown Chronicles 39: Bernard

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Bernard checks Twitter.
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George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950), known at his insistence simply as Bernard Shaw, was an Irish playwright, critic, polemicist and political activist. His play The Doctor’s Dilemma was first staged in 1906. It is a problem play about the moral dilemmas created by limited medical resources, and the conflicts between the demands of private medicine as a business and a vocation [Wikipedia entry].

Source texts: Gabriel Scally @GabrielScally (9 June 2020, 8:52 PM BST). #COVID19 drive-in test centres run by Deloitte; contract tracing run by Serco, helped by Capita. I think George Bernard Shaw had something to say on the matter in 1911. #coronavirus. Tweet. Available from https://twitter.com/GabrielScally/status/1270443754613325824 [Accessed 9 June 2020]. Shaw, G. (1909) The Doctor’s Dilemma: Preface on Doctors, Project Gutenberg. Available via https://www.gutenberg.org/files/5069/5069-h/5069-h.htm [Accessed 9 June 2020]. Additional references below.

Source image: Photograph of Bernard Shaw writing in notebook at time of first production of his play “Pygmalion”, 1914. LIFE Photo Archive on Google, © Time Inc. Original for personal non-commercial use only.  Photo reused here under educational fair dealing via Wikimedia Commons. This comic strip CC-BY-NC-SA.

References

Gabriel Scally @GabrielScally (9 June 2020, 8:52 PM BST). #COVID19 drive-in test centres run by Deloitte; contract tracing run by Serco, helped by Capita. I think George Bernard Shaw had something to say on the matter in 1911. #coronavirus. Tweet. Available from https://twitter.com/GabrielScally/status/1270443754613325824 [Accessed 9 June 2020].

Shaw, G. (1909) The Doctor’s Dilemma: Preface on Doctors, Project Gutenberg. Available via https://www.gutenberg.org/files/5069/5069-h/5069-h.htm [Accessed 9 June 2020].

Taylor, D. (6 June 2020) “Serco wins Covid-19 test-and-trace contract despite £1m fine”. The Guardian. Available at https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/jun/06/serco-wins-covid-19-test-and-trace-contract-despite-1m-fine [Accessed 9 June 2020]

Garside, J. (23 April 2020) “Hospitals sound alarm over privately run virus test centre at Surrey theme park”. The Guardian. Available at https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/apr/23/hospitals-sound-alarm-over-privately-run-test-centre-in-surrey [Accessed 9 June 2020]

English Heritage. Blue Plaques. Shaw, George Bernard (1856-1950). Available at https://www.english-heritage.org.uk/visit/blue-plaques/george-bernard-shaw/ [Accessed 9 June 2020]

Photograph of Bernard Shaw writing in notebook at time of first production of his play “Pygmalion”, 1914. LIFE Photo Archive on Google, © Time Inc. Original for personal non-commercial use only.  Photo reused here under educational fair dealing via Wikimedia Commons, available at https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:George_Bernard_Shaw_notebook.jpg  [Accessed 9 June 2020]

 

The Lockdown Chronicles is a series of periodical comic strips made at night (in candlelight!) adapting and reusing openly-licensed or public domain items from online digital collections. Publication and tweetage are scheduled in advance. Historical sources are adapted and updated for the current pandemic; please refer to each strip’s references on each post for further context.  Catch up with the series at https://epriego.blog/tag/the-lockdown-chronicles/.

The Lockdown Chronicles 38: The Department of Health and Social Care

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The Department of Health and Social Care tweets.
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Source: Department of Health and Social Care. “As of 9am 6 June, there have been 5,438,712 tests, with 218,187 tests on 5 June. 284,868 people have tested positive. As of 5pm on 5 June, of those tested positive for coronavirus, across all settings, 40,465 have sadly died. More info at https://www.gov.uk/guidance/coronavirus-covid-19-information-for-the-public” Tweet. @DHSCgovuk 2:11 PM BST, June 6, 2020. Twitter Web App. Available from https://twitter.com/DHSCgovuk/status/1269255676020301824 [Accessed 6 June 2020].

This comic strip CC-BY-NC-SA.

 

References and additional resources

Department of Health and Social Care. “As of 9am 6 June, there have been 5,438,712 tests, with 218,187 tests on 5 June. 284,868 people have tested positive. As of 5pm on 5 June, of those tested positive for coronavirus, across all settings, 40,465 have sadly died.
More info at https://www.gov.uk/guidance/coronavirus-covid-19-information-for-the-public” Tweet. @DHSCgovuk 2:11 PM BST, June 6, 2020. Twitter Web App. Available from https://twitter.com/DHSCgovuk/status/1269255676020301824 [Accessed 6 June 2020].

Gov.uk. Coronavirus (COVID-19) in the UK, available at https://coronavirus.data.gov.uk [Accessed 6 June 2020]

Office for National Statistics, “Latest data and analysis on coronavirus (COVID-19) in the UK and its effect on the economy and society.” Available at  https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/healthandsocialcare/conditionsanddiseases [Accessed 6 June 2020]

Johns Hopkins University Coronavirus Resource Center, available at https://coronavirus.jhu.edu/ [Accessed 6 June 2020]

Sandle, P., and Faulconbridge, G. Reuters. (28 March 2020) World News.
“UK coronavirus death toll under 20,000 would be ‘good result’, says health chief”. Available fromhttps://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-coronavirus-britain/uk-coronavirus-death-toll-under-20000-would-be-good-result-says-health-chief-idUSKBN21F0HV . [Accessed 6 June 2020]

The Lockdown Chronicles is a series of periodical comic strips made at night (in candlelight!) adapting and reusing openly-licensed or public domain items from online digital collections. Publication and tweetage are scheduled in advance. Historical sources are adapted and updated for the current pandemic; please refer to each strip’s references on each post for further context.  Catch up with the series at https://epriego.blog/tag/the-lockdown-chronicles/.

The Lockdown Chronicles 37: Stuart

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Stuart is giving a webinar.
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Stuart Hall (Kingston, Jamaica, 1932– London, England, UK, 2014) was an influential British sociologist, cultural theorist, campaigner and founding editor of the New Left Review. Hall was one of the co-founders of the school of thought now known as British Cultural Studies or The Birmingham School of Cultural Studies [Wikipedia entry] [Guardian Obituary]

Text sources: UK Research and Innovation (27 May 2020) Why do people from ethnic minorities suffer more from COVID-19?. Available from https://coronavirusexplained.ukri.org/en/article/cad0011/ [Accessed 5 June 2020], CC-BY UKRI; Hall, S. (1991) “Old and New Identities, Old and New Ethnicities”, in Essential Essays, Volume 2: Identity and Diaspora, edited by David Morley, Duke University Press, 2018.

Source image: Portrait photograph of Stuart Hall (.ca 1985). Available publicly via the Open University Digital Archive under The Open University conditions of use, and reused here under fair dealing for educational use. © 2018 The Open University. This comic strip CC-BY-NC-SA

References

UK Research and Innovation (27 May 2020) Why do people from ethnic minorities suffer more from COVID-19?. Available from https://coronavirusexplained.ukri.org/en/article/cad0011/ [Accessed 5 June 2020]

Hall, S. (1991) “Old and New Identities, Old and New Ethnicities”, in Essential Essays, Volume 2: Identity and Diaspora, edited by David Morley, Duke University Press, 2018.

Stokes P. 2011 Census: Key Statistics and Quick Statistics for Local Authorities in the United Kingdom. Office for National Statistics. 2013 Oct. Available fromhttps://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/populationandmigration/populationestimates/bulletins/keystatisticsandquickstatisticsforlocalauthoritiesintheunitedkingdom/2013-10-11 [Accessed 5 June 2020]

Khunti K, Singh AK, Pareek M, Hanif W. Is ethnicity linked to incidence or outcomes of covid-19? BMJ. 2020 Apr;369:m1548. DOI: 10.1136/bmj.m1548.

The Lockdown Chronicles is a series of periodical comic strips made at night (in candlelight!) adapting and reusing openly-licensed or public domain items from online digital collections. Publication and tweetage are scheduled in advance. Historical sources are adapted and updated for the current pandemic; please refer to each strip’s references on each post for further context.  Catch up with the series at https://epriego.blog/tag/the-lockdown-chronicles/.

The Lockdown Chronicles 36: George

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Rest in Power, George Floyd.
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Rest in Power, George Perry Floyd (16 October 1973 – 25 May 2020). [Wikipedia entry].

We will not be satis­fied until justice rolls down like waters and righteousness like a mighty stream.”

– Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (1963).

Sign the AVAAZ public open letter against racism and police brutality: https://secure.avaaz.org/campaign/en/george_floyd_loc/ 

On #BlackOutTuesday: https://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/gadgets-and-tech/features/blackout-tuesday-instagram-black-squares-how-to-post-box-a9543896.html

This comic strip CC-BY-NC-SA

 

The Lockdown Chronicles is a series of periodical comic strips made at night (in candlelight!) adapting and reusing openly-licensed or public domain items from online digital collections. Publication and tweetage are scheduled in advance. Historical sources are adapted and updated for the current pandemic; please refer to each strip’s references on each post for further context.  Catch up with the series at https://epriego.blog/tag/the-lockdown-chronicles/.

 

The Lockdown Chronicles 35: Walter

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Walter livestreams.
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Walter Benjamin (1892–1940) was a German Jewish philosopher, cultural critic and essayist. Benjamin made enduring and influential contributions to aesthetic theory, literary criticism, and historical materialism. “Theses on the Philosophy of History” also known as “On the Concept of History” is often cited as Benjamin’s last complete work. The Institute for Social Research, by then relocated to New York, published it in Benjamin’s memory in 1942 [Wikipedia entry].

Text sources: Kwai, I. (1 June 2020). “U.S. Protests, Coronavirus, SpaceX: Your Monday Briefing”. The New York Times, NYT.com; ADPH Presidential Blog (31 May 2020) “ADPH Presidential Blog: “A time for steady leadership, careful preparation and measured steps”, https://www.adph.org.uk/; Benjamin, W. (2003) [1940] “On the Concept of History”, Selected Writings Vol. 4, Harvard.

Source image: photograph of Walter Benjamin, 1928, Akademie der Künste, Berlin, Walter Benjamin Archiv, via Wikimedia Commons. Public Domain. This comic strip CC-BY-NC-SA.

References

Kwai, I. (1 June 2020) “U.S. Protests, Coronavirus, SpaceX: Your Monday Briefing”. The New York Times. Available at https://www.nytimes.com/2020/06/01/briefing/us-protests-coronavirus-spacex.html [Accessed 1 June 2020]

ADPH Presidential Blog (31 May 2020) “ADPH Presidential Blog: A time for steady leadership, careful preparation and measured steps”. Available at https://www.adph.org.uk/2020/05/adph-presidential-blog-a-time-for-steady-leadership-careful-preparation-and-measured-steps/ [Accessed 1 June 2020]

Benjamin, W. (2003) [1940] “On the Concept of History”, Selected Writings Vol. 4, Harvard. Scanned PDF version via Warwick University at https://warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/english/currentstudents/undergraduate/modules/fulllist/second/en229/benjamin_on_the_concept_of_history.pdf  [Accessed 1 June 2020]. HTML version via Simon Fraser University at https://www.sfu.ca/~andrewf/CONCEPT2.html [Accessed 1 June 2020]

Photograph of Walter Benjamin in 1928, Akademie der Künste, Berlin, Walter Benjamin Archiv, via Wikimedia Commons, available at https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Walter_Benjamin_vers_1928.jpg [Accessed 1 June 2020]

Additional Readings

Tomlins, C. (1 December 2010) “Lessons of History”. Perspectives on History. Available via https://www.historians.org/publications-and-directories/perspectives-on-history/december-2010/lessons-of-history [Accessed 1 June 2020]

Kirsch, A. (14 August 2006) “The Philosopher Stoned”. The New Yorker. Available at https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2006/08/21/the-philosopher-stoned [Accessed 1 June 2020]

The Lockdown Chronicles is a series of periodical comic strips made at night (in candlelight!) adapting and reusing openly-licensed or public domain items from online digital collections. Publication and tweetage are scheduled in advance. Historical sources are adapted and updated for the current pandemic; please refer to each strip’s references on each post for further context.  Catch up with the series at https://epriego.blog/tag/the-lockdown-chronicles/.

The Lockdown Chronicles 34: Susan

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Susan chips in.
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Susan Sontag (1933–2004) was an American writer, filmmaker, philosopher, teacher, and political activist. She wrote extensively about photography, culture and media, cancer, AIDS and illness, human rights, and other topics [Wikipedia entry].

Text sources: Text sources: speech balloon in panel 1, United Nations Secretary-General Antonio Guterres, May 8, 2020, as quoted by Human Rights Watch (12 May 2020); captions in panels 1-3: Human Rights Watch (12 May 2020) Covid-19 Fueling Anti-Asian Racism and Xenophobia Worldwide, available via https://www.hrw.org/; speech balloons in panels 2-4: Sontag, Susan (1989). AIDS and Its Metaphors. Farrar, Straus and Giroux, New York.

Source image: photograph of Susan Sontag in her home in 1979, CC-BY Lynn Gilbert, via Wikimedia Commons. © Lynn Gilbert. This comic strip CC-BY-NC-SA

References

Human Rights Watch (12 May 2020) Covid-19 Fueling Anti-Asian Racism and Xenophobia Worldwide, available via https://www.hrw.org/news/2020/05/12/covid-19-fueling-anti-asian-racism-and-xenophobia-worldwide [Accessed 28 May 2020]

Sontag, S. (1989) AIDS and Its Metaphors. Farrar, Straus and Giroux, New York. Scanned version available via Monoskop at https://monoskop.org/File:Susan_Sontag_AIDS_and_Its_Metaphors_1989.pdf [PDF]. [Accessed 28 May 2020]

Gilbert, L. (1979).Photograph of Susan Sontag in her home. CC-BY Lynn Gilbert, via Wikimedia Commons at https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Susan_Sontag_1979_%C2%A9Lynn_Gilbert.jpg  © Lynn Gilbert. [Accessed 28 May 2020]

The Lockdown Chronicles is a series of periodical comic strips made at night (in candlelight!) adapting and reusing openly-licensed or public domain items from online digital collections. Publication and tweetage are scheduled in advance. Historical sources are adapted and updated for the current pandemic; please refer to each strip’s references on each post for further context.  Catch up with the series at https://epriego.blog/tag/the-lockdown-chronicles/.

 

The Lockdown Chronicles 33: Emmeline

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Click on the image below to read the comic strip in full size. Sources and references on this post under the comic strip below.

Emmeline is on FaceTime.
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Emmeline Pankhurst (1858–1928) was a British political activist best remembered for organising the UK suffragette movement and helping women win the right to vote [Wikipedia entry].

Text sources: Institute for Fiscal Studies (27 May 2020) “How are mothers and fathers balancing work and family under lockdown?”, available from https://www.ifs.org.uk/; Ascher, D. (27 May 2020) “Coronavirus: ‘Mums do most childcare and chores in lockdown”. BBC News; Emmeline Pankhurst’s “Freedom or death”, speech delivered in Hartford, Connecticut on November 13 1913, via The Guardian Great speeches of the 20th century, 27 April 2007.

Source image: Matzene, C. (1913) Emmeline Pankhurst. England United States, 1913. Nov. [Photograph] Women of Protest: Photographs from the Records of the National Woman’s Party, Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Public Domain. This comic strip CC-BY-NC-SA.

References

Institute for Fiscal Studies (27 May 2020) “How are mothers and fathers balancing work and family under lockdown?” Available at https://www.ifs.org.uk/publications/14860 [Accessed 27 May 2020]

Ascher, D. (27 May 2020) “Coronavirus: ‘Mums do most childcare and chores in lockdown”. BBC News. Available at https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-52808930 [Accessed 27 May 2020]

Pankhurstm E. (1913) “Freedom or death”, speech delivered in Hartford, Connecticut on November 13 1913, via The Guardian Great speeches of the 20th century, 27 April 2007. Available via https://www.theguardian.com/theguardian/2007/apr/27/greatspeeches [Accessed 27 May 2020]

Matzene, C. (1913) Emmeline Pankhurst. England United States, 1913. Nov. [Photograph] Women of Protest: Photographs from the Records of the National Woman’s Party, Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Retrieved from https://www.loc.gov/item/mnwp000042/ [Accessed 27 May 2020]

 

The Lockdown Chronicles is a series of periodical comic strips made at night (in candlelight!) adapting and reusing openly-licensed or public domain items from online digital collections. Publication and tweetage are scheduled in advance. Historical sources are adapted and updated for the current pandemic; please refer to each strip’s references on each post for further context.  Catch up with the series at https://epriego.blog/tag/the-lockdown-chronicles/.