The Lockdown Chronicles 19: Ricardo

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Ricardo is in prison.
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Original idea and historical image and text research by Ira Franco; adaptation, layout, translation and additional research by Ernesto Priego.

Ricardo Flores Magón (Eloxochitlán, Oaxaca, 16 September 1874 – Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary, Kansas, 22 November 1922) was the main ideologist of the Mexican anarchist movement, a key component for the development of the Mexican Revolution (1910-1920). While in exile in the United States, he was charged with sedition and espionage by the W. Wilson administration and sentenced to twenty years in prison. He died 5 years later, blind from glaucoma and diabetes, in a cell at the Leavenworth Kansas Penitentiary. [Wikipedia entry]

His correspondence during his confinement is available via the Archivo Electrónico Ricardo Flores Magón (INAH, México).

Source texts: Letters from Ricardo Flores Magón (Eloxochitlán, Oaxaca, 16 September 1874 – Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary, Kansas, 22 November 1922) to Raúl Palma (6 August 1918), Nicolás T. Bernal (26 May 1921) and Ellen White (5 April 1921), via Archivo Electrónico Ricardo Flores Magón, INAH, Mexico; Evelyn, Kenya (10 April 2020) “Prison uprising put down as US inmates demand protection from coronavirus”, the Guardian; Bernard, Katie (30 April 2020) “All Lansing prisoners to be tested for COVID-19 after multiple asymptomatic positives”, The Kansas City Star.

Source images: Panel 1: Kansas. Fort Leavenworth. U.S. Military Prison [no date], photographic print, George Grantham Bain Collection, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, no known restrictions on publication; panels 2-4: Ricardo Flores Magón (1978), linocut on paper by Carlos A. Cortés, Smithsonian American Art Museum, Public Domain. This comic strip CC-BY-NC-SA.

 

References

Ricardo Flores Magón, Correspondencia, Archivo Electrónico Ricardo Flores Magón, INAH, Mexico, available at http://archivomagon.net/obras-completas/correspondencia/. [Accessed 4 May 2020]

Letter from Ricardo Flores Magón to Raúl Palma, 6 August 1918, Archivo Electrónico Ricardo Flores Magón, INAH, Mexico. Available at http://archivomagon.net/obras-completas/correspondencia-1899-1922/c-1918/cor361/ [Accessed 4 May 2020]

Letter from Ricardo Flores Magón to Ellen White, 5 April 1921, Archivo Electrónico Ricardo Flores Magón, INAH, Mexico. Available at http://archivomagon.net/obras-completas/correspondencia-1899-1922/c-1921/cor44-2/  [Accessed 4 May 2020]

Letter from Ricardo Flores Magón to Nicolás T. Bernal. 26 May 1921,  Archivo Electrónico Ricardo Flores Magón, INAH, Mexico. Available at http://archivomagon.net/obras-completas/correspondencia-1899-1922/c-1921/cor55-2/ [Accessed 4 May 2020]

U.S. Federal Bureau of Prisons. (Last Updated: Saturday, 25 April 2020)  Inmate Citizenship, Statistics based on prior month’s data. Available at https://www.bop.gov/about/statistics/statistics_inmate_citizenship.jsp [Accessed 4 May 2020]

Bernard, Katie (30 April 2020) “All Lansing prisoners to be tested for COVID-19 after multiple asymptomatic positives”, The Kansas City Star, available via https://www.kansascity.com/news/local/article242408021.html [Accessed 4 May 2020]

Evelyn, Kenya (10 April 2020) “Prison uprising put down as US inmates demand protection from coronavirus”, the Guardian. Available at https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2020/apr/10/us-prisons-coronavirus-uprising-riot [Accessed 4 May 2020]

Kansas. Fort Leavenworth. U.S. Military Prison [no date], photographic print, George Grantham Bain Collection, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division. Available at https://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2005686565/ [Accessed 4 May 2020]

Cortés, Carlos A. (1978) Ricardo Flores Magón. Linocut on paper. Smithsonian American Art Museum. Available at https://americanart.si.edu/artwork/ricardo-flores-magon-33504  [Accessed 4 May 2020]

The Lockdown Chronicles is a series of periodical comic strips made at night (in candlelight!) adapting and reusing openly-licensed or public domain items from online digital collections. Publication and tweetage are scheduled in advance. Historical sources are adapted and updated for the current pandemic; please refer to each strip’s references on each post for further context.  Catch up with the series at https://epriego.blog/tag/the-lockdown-chronicles/.

The Lockdown Chronicles 18: Walt

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Walt sits and looks out.
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Walt Whitman (May 31, 1819 – March 26, 1892) was an American poet, essayist, and journalist. A humanist, he was a part of the transition between transcendentalism and realism, incorporating both views in his works. After suffering a paralytic stroke in early 1873, Whitman was induced to move from Washington to the home of his brother—George Washington Whitman, an engineer—at 431 Stevens Street in Camden, New Jersey. While in residence there he was very productive, publishing three versions of Leaves of Grass among other works. [Wikipedia entry] You can read Leaves of Grass in its entirety via The Walt Whitman Archive.

Source texts: Whitman, Walt (1819 – 1892), “I Sit and Look Out”, from Leaves of Grass (1891–92), via The Walt Whitman Archive, CC BY-NC-SA 3.0; “New Jersey is now reporting more virus deaths per day than New York” in “New York Closes Schools Through End of Academic Year” (1 May 2020), New York. The New York Times;  Benner, Katie (April 13 2020) “Inmates at N.J. Women’s Prison Endured Years of Sex Abuse, Justice Dept. Finds”, Politics. The New York Times; MacFarquhar, Neil (May 3 2020), “The Coronavirus Becomes a Battle Cry for U.S. Extremists”. U.S: The New York Times, © 2020 NYTCo.

Source images: Panel 1: The Walt Whitman House in Camden, NJ (2007), via Wikimedia Commons; Public Domain. Panel 2: Portrait of Walt Whitman taken at Mathew Brady’s studio in Washington, D.C. between 1865 and 1867, wet plate negative, U.S. National Archives 111-B-1672; National Archives Flickr, Unrestricted Use. This comic strip CC-BY-NC-SA.

 

References

Whitman, Walt (1891–92), “I Sit and Look Out”,  from Leaves of Grass, via The Walt Whitman Archive, Gen. ed. Ed Folsom and Kenneth M. Price. Available at https://whitmanarchive.org/published/LG/1891/poems/129 [Accessed 3 May 2020]

“New Jersey is now reporting more virus deaths per day than New York” in “New York Closes Schools Through End of Academic Year” (1 May 2020), New York. The New York Times; available at https://www.nytimes.com/2020/05/01/nyregion/coronavirus-new-york-update.html [Accessed 3 May 2020]

Benner, Katie (13 April 2020) “Inmates at N.J. Women’s Prison Endured Years of Sex Abuse, Justice Dept. Finds”, Politics. The New York Times; available at https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/13/us/politics/prisons-civil-rights-justice-department.html  [Accessed 3 May 2020]

MacFarquhar, Neil (3 May 2020), “The Coronavirus Becomes a Battle Cry for U.S. Extremists”. U.S: The New York Times, available at https://www.nytimes.com/2020/05/03/us/coronavirus-extremists.html  [Accessed 3 May 2020]

Pavlovitz, John (1 May 2020) “The White Privilege to Terrorize”. Available at https://johnpavlovitz.com/2020/05/01/the-white-privilege-to-terrorize/ [Accessed 3 May 2020]

Price, Kenneth M. (2011) ‘“Whitman, Walt, Clerk”. The Poet Was a Seer of Democracy and Bureaucracy’. National Archives Prologue Magazine, Winter 2011, Vol. 43, No. 4, available at https://www.archives.gov/publications/prologue/2011/winter/whitman.html [Accessed 3 May 2020]

The Walt Whitman House in Camden, NJ (2007), via Wikimedia Commons; Public Domain, available at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walt_Whitman#/media/File:WhitmanHouse-CamdenNJ1.jpg [Accessed 3 May 2020]

Portrait of Walt Whitman taken at Mathew Brady’s studio in Washington, D.C. between 1865 and 1867; wet plate negative; U.S. National Archives 111-B-1672; National Archives Flickr; available at https://www.flickr.com/photos/35740357@N03/4222278143/ [Accessed 3 May 2020]

Portrait of Walt Whitman taken at Mathew Brady’s studio in Washington, D.C.; wet plate negative; purchased from Brady for the U.S. National Archives in 1873, via The Walt Whitman Archive, available at https://whitmanarchive.org/multimedia/image022.html [Accessed 3 May 2020]

The Lockdown Chronicles is a series of periodical comic strips made at night (in candlelight!) adapting and reusing openly-licensed or public domain items from online digital collections. Publication and tweetage are scheduled in advance. Historical sources are adapted and updated for the current pandemic; please refer to each strip’s references on each post for further context.  Catch up with the series at https://epriego.blog/tag/the-lockdown-chronicles/.

The Lockdown Chronicles 17: Frida

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Frida hadn't thought of it.
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Frida Kahlo (6 July 1907 – 13 July 1954) was a Mexican painter known for her many portraits, self-portraits, and works inspired by the nature and artifacts of Mexico. [Wikipedia entry].

On September 17, 1925, Frida was in a serious traffic accident which resulted in multiple body fractures and internal lesions inflicted by an iron rod that had pierced her stomach and uterus. It took her three months in full-body cast to recover and though she eventually willed her way to walking again, she spent the rest of her life battling frequent relapses of extreme pain and enduring frequent hospital visits, including more than thirty operations. As a way of occupying herself while bedridden, Kahlo made her first strides in painting — then went on to become one of the most influential painters in modern art. [Popova 2013]

“I never thought of painting until 1926, when I was in bed on account of an automobile accident,” she wrote to gallery owner Julien Levy before her 1938 show. “I was bored as hell in bed . . . so I decided to do something. I stoled [sic] from my father some oil paints, and my mother ordered for me a special easel because I couldn’t sit down [the letter was written in English; she meant sit up], and I started to paint.”  [Karbo 2019]

“Viva la Vida” (1954) is known to be the last painting that Frida Kahlo did. Despite her deteriorated health, the title of this work is a tribute to life. [Google Arts & Culture]

Text based on the 1938 letter from Frida Kahlo (1907–1954) to Julien Levy (1906–1981), as cited in Karbo, Karen (2018) In Praise of Difficult Women, New York: Simon & Schuster.

Source image: Frida Kahlo, Mexico, 16 October 1932, photograph by Guillermo Kahlo (1871–1941), gelatin silver print, original via Sotheby’s Modern and Contemporary Latin American Art; version used sourced via Wikimedia Commons; image is in the public domain in its country of origin and other countries and areas where the copyright term is the author’s life plus 70 years or fewer. This comic strip CC-BY-NC-SA.

References

Karbo, Karen (2018) In Praise of Difficult Women, New York: Simon & Schuster. Excerpt available via National Geographic, 9 April  2019, at https://www.nationalgeographic.co.uk/2019/01/excerpt-inconvenient-spectacle-frida-kahlo [Accessed 1 May 2020]

Museo Frida Kahlo, Mexico City, “El universo íntimo”, available at http://www.museofridakahlo.org.mx/EluniversointimoINGLES.html [Accessed 1 May 2020]

The diary of Frida Kahlo: an intimate self-portrait, available to borrow online from the Internet Archive, available at https://archive.org/details/diaryoffridakahl00kahl/ [Accessed 1 May 2020]

Kahlo, Guillermo (16 October 1932) Frida Kahlo. Photograph, gelatin silver print, available via Wikimedia Commons: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Frida_Kahlo,_by_Guillermo_Kahlo.jpg . Original via Sotheby’s Modern and Contemporary Latin American Art, available via http://www.sothebys.com/en/auctions/ecatalogue/2014/latin-american-art-n09152/lot.148.html [Accessed 1 May 2020]

The Lockdown Chronicles is a series of periodical comic strips made at night (in candlelight!) adapting and reusing openly-licensed or public domain items from online digital collections. Publication and tweetage are scheduled in advance. Historical sources are adapted and updated for the current pandemic; please refer to each strip’s references on each post for further context.  Catch up with the series at https://epriego.blog/tag/the-lockdown-chronicles/.

The Lockdown Chronicles 16: Albert

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Albert is bored
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Albert Camus (7 November 1913 – 4 January 1960) was a French philosopher, author, and journalist. He won the Nobel Prize in Literature at the age of 44 in 1957, the second-youngest recipient in history.  [Wikipedia entry]

The Plague (French: La Peste) is a novel by Albert Camus, published in 1947, that tells the story of a plague sweeping the French Algerian city of Oran. The characters in the book, ranging from doctors to vacationers to fugitives, all help to show the effects the plague has on the population, and in so doing poses questions about the human condition.  [Wikipedia entry]

Camus finished a first draft of his novel L’Étranger (1942) alone in a hotel room in Montmartre. The former Hôtel du Poirier on the rue Ravignan sits atop one of Paris’s “buttes” or hills, whose cleaner air might have benefited the young writer, who struggled with chronic tuberculosis. [The Paris Review]

Text adapted from Camus, Albert (1913 – 1960) La Peste, Paris: Gallimard, 1947; Aarons, Ed, and Lowe, Sid (28 April 2020) “French football season will not resume but La Liga has new hope of restart”, the Guardian.; Jones, A. (2009), Football as a metaphor: learning to cope with life, manage emotional illness and maintain health through to recovery. Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, 16: 488-492. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2850.2009.01403.x

Source image: Albert Camus, Nobel prize winner, half-length portrait, seated at desk, facing left, smoking cigarette. Photograph by United Press International, via Wikimedia Commons, Public Domain. This comic strip CC-BY-NC-SA.

References

Camus, Albert (1947) La Peste, Paris: Gallimard. English version text available via the Internet Archive at https://archive.org/stream/plague02camu/plague02camu_djvu.txt (Accessed 30 April 2020)

Aarons, Ed, and Lowe, Sid (28 April 2020) “French football season will not resume but La Liga has new hope of restart”, the Guardian. Available at https://www.theguardian.com/football/2020/apr/28/french-football-season-cancelled-with-no-games-until-at-least-august-prime-minister-coronavirus (Accessed 30 April 2020)

Jones, A. (2009), Football as a metaphor: learning to cope with life, manage emotional illness and maintain health through to recovery. Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, 16: 488-492. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2850.2009.01403.x 

Kaplan, Alice (19 September 2016) “Paris from Camus’s Notebooks”, The Paris Review. Available at https://www.theparisreview.org/blog/2016/09/19/paris-camuss-notebooks/ (Accessed 30 April 2020)

Illing, Sean (16 March 2020). “This is a Time for Solidarity”. Vox. Available at https://www.vox.com/2020/3/13/21172237/coronavirus-covid-19-albert-camus-the-plague (Accessed 30 April 2020)

The Lockdown Chronicles is a series of periodical comic strips made at night (in candlelight!) adapting and reusing openly-licensed or public domain items from online digital collections. Publication and tweetage are scheduled in advance. Historical sources are adapted and updated for the current pandemic; please refer to each strip’s references on each post for further context.  Catch up with the series at https://epriego.blog/tag/the-lockdown-chronicles/.

The Lockdown Chronicles 15: Mary

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Mary is teaching online from home.
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Mary Somerville (née Fairfax, formerly Greig; 26 December 1780 – 29 November 1872) was a Scottish science writer and polymath. She studied mathematics and astronomy, and was nominated to be jointly the first female member of the Royal Astronomical Society at the same time as Caroline Herschel. In 1819 her husband was appointed physician to Chelsea Hospital and the family moved to Hanover Square into a government house in Chelsea. Somerville was a friend of Anne Isabella Milbanke, Baroness Wentworth, and was mathematics tutor to her daughter, Ada Lovelace. With Somerville, Ada attended the scientific gatherings where she met Charles Babbage. [Wikipedia entry]

Text adapted from Somerville, Mary [1780–1872] On the connexion of the physical sciences (1834). London: J. Murray. Wellcome Collection. Public Domain Mark; Somerville, Martha (1873). Personal Recollections, from Early Life to Old Age, of Mary Somerville: With Selections from Her Correspondence. London: J. Murray. Wellcome Collection. Public Domain Mark.

Source image: Mary Somerville [Fairfax]. Stipple engraving by W. Holl, 1858, after J. R. Swinton, 1848.Wellcome Library no. 8891i; Wellcome Collection. CC BY 4.0. This comic strip CC-BY-NC-SA.

References

Somerville, Mary (1834) On the connexion of the physical sciences. London: J. Murray. Wellcome Collection. Available at https://wellcomecollection.org/works/t8qef4k4 [Accessed 29 April 2020]

Somerville, Martha (1873) Personal Recollections, from Early Life to Old Age, of Mary Somerville: With Selections from Her Correspondence. London: J. Murray. Wellcome Collection. Available at https://wellcomecollection.org/works/we9qcvzx [Accessed 29 April 2020]

Mary Somerville [Fairfax]. Stipple engraving by W. Holl, 1858, after J. R. Swinton, 1848.Wellcome Library no. 8891i; Wellcome Collection. Available at https://wellcomecollection.org/works/uww3svfm [Accessed 29 April 2020]

 

The Lockdown Chronicles is a series of periodical comic strips made at night (in candlelight!) adapting and reusing openly-licensed or public domain items from online digital collections. Publication and tweetage are scheduled in advance. Historical sources are adapted and updated for the current pandemic; please refer to each strip’s references on each post for further context.  Catch up with the series at https://epriego.blog/tag/the-lockdown-chronicles/.

The Lockdown Chronicles 14: Virginia

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Work, even in poverty and obscurity, is worth while.”

– Virginia Woolf, A Room of One’s Own (1929)

 

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Virginia said she would order the flowers herself.
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Adeline Virginia Woolf ( 25 January 1882 – 28 March 1941) was an English writer, considered one of the most important modernist 20th-century authors. Her novel Mrs Dalloway (1925) and her essay  A Room of One’s Own (1929) (in which she wrote the much-quoted dictum, “A woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction”) are among her best-known works. [Wikipedia Entry].

Source text: Panel 1: BBC News. 28 April 2020. “Coronavirus: Remembering 100 NHS and healthcare workers who have died”. bbc.co.uk; Woolf, Virginia (1925) Mrs. Dalloway, text via Project Gutenberg of Australia; panels 2 and 4: Woolf, Virginia (1935) [1929] A Room of One’s Own, text via Project Gutenberg of Australia; both originally published in London by Hogarth Press.

Source image: Photograph of Virginia Woolf aged 20, (January 25, 1882 – March 28, 1941) by George Charles Beresford (10 July 1864 – 21 February 1938), via Wikimedia Commons. Public Domain. This comic strip CC-BY-NC-SA.

 

References

BBC News (28 April 2020). “Coronavirus: Remembering 100 NHS and healthcare workers who have died”. Available at https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-52242856# [accessed 28 April 2020]

Woolf, Virginia (1925) Mrs. Dalloway, text via Project Gutenberg of Australia: http://gutenberg.net.au/ebooks02/0200991h.html [accessed 28 April 2020]

Woolf, Virginia (1935) [1929] A Room of One’s Own, text via Project Gutenberg of Australia: http://gutenberg.net.au/ebooks02/0200791.txt [accessed 28 April 2020]

A Room of One’s Own by Virginia Woolf. Book. Collection Items. The British Library. Available at https://www.bl.uk/collection-items/a-room-of-ones-own-by-virginia-woolf [accessed 28 April 2020]

Bradshaw, David (25 May 2016). “Mrs Dalloway and the First World War”. The British Library. Available at https://www.bl.uk/20th-century-literature/articles/mrs-dalloway-and-the-first-world-war [accessed 28 April 2020]

Bowlby, Rachel (25 May 2016). “An introduction to A Room of One’s Own” Available at https://www.bl.uk/20th-century-literature/articles/an-introduction-to-a-room-of-ones-own  [accessed 28 April 2020]

George Charles Beresford – Virginia Woolf in 1902. Wikimedia Commons. Available at https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:George_Charles_Beresford_-_Virginia_Woolf_in_1902_-_Restoration.jpg [accessed 28 April 2020]

 

P.S. Needless to say the National Portrait Gallery, London, has an extraordinary online collection of digitised Virginia Woolf portraits in their collection. However their licensing impedes derivatives (why?!) so  my only option was to use the Wikimedia Commons version.  [If you read all the way here thank you- you are my ideal reader!].

The Lockdown Chronicles is a series of periodical comic strips made at night (in candlelight!) adapting and reusing openly-licensed or public domain items from online digital collections. Publication and tweetage are scheduled in advance. Historical sources are adapted and updated for the current pandemic; please refer to each strip’s references on each post for further context.  Catch up with the series at https://epriego.blog/tag/the-lockdown-chronicles/.

The Lockdown Chronicles 13: Dr Mead

 

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Dr Mead prescribes continuing the 'quarentine'.
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Richard Mead, FRS, FRCP, (11 August 1673 – 16 February 1754) was an English physician. His work, A Short Discourse concerning Pestilential Contagion, and the Method to be used to prevent it (1720) [text] [digitised] was written in reaction to the outbreak at Marseilles. In 1703 he was elected physician to St. Thomas’ Hospital. [Wikipedia entry] [On Marseille, cfr this case study from The Edward Worth Library].

Text adapted from A Short Discourse concerning Pestilential Contagion, and the Method to be used to prevent it (1720), by Richard Mead (1673-1754). Text version via Eighteenth Century Collections Online, Text Creation Partnership.

Source images: Panel 1: Old St. Thomas’s Hospital, Southwark: the entrance courtyard. Engraving. Wellcome Library no. 39315i; Wellcome Collection, Wellcome Images, CC BY 4.0. Panels 2-4: Richard Mead. Reproduction of drawing, 1888, after W. Hogarth. Wellcome Library no. 6457iM; Wellcome Collection, Wellcome Images, CC BY 4.0 This comic strip CC-BY-NC-SA.

 

References

Mead, Richard. (1720). A short discourse concerning pestilential contagion: and the methods to be used to prevent it.  London: printed for Sam. Buckley, and Ralph Smith, 1720. Text version via Eighteenth Century Collections Online, Text Creation Partnership, available at: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/004833363.0001.000. The digitised version is available via the Wellcome Library, Wellcome Collection, at https://wellcomecollection.org/works/gg3azyks [Accessed 27 April 2020].

The Edward Worth Library, “Case Study: Plague at Marseilles 1720”. Infectious Diseases at The Edward Worth Library. Available at https://infectiousdiseases.edwardworthlibrary.ie/plague/marseilles-case-study/ [Accessed 27 April 2020].

Old St. Thomas’s Hospital, Southwark: the entrance courtyard. Engraving. Wellcome Library no. 39315i; Wellcome Collection, Wellcome Images, available at https://wellcomecollection.org/works/m7xt98x2 [Accessed 27 April 2020].

Richard Mead. Reproduction of drawing, 1888, after W. Hogarth. Wellcome Library no. 6457iM; Wellcome Collection, Wellcome Images, available at https://wellcomecollection.org/works/ufzwpn7c [Accessed 27 April 2020].

NHS England and NHS. Coronavirus. Primary Care. (2020). Accessing supplies of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE). Available at  https://www.england.nhs.uk/coronavirus/primary-care/infection-control/ppe/ [Accessed 27 April 2020].

The Lockdown Chronicles is a series of periodical comic strips made at night (in candlelight!) adapting and reusing openly-licensed or public domain items from online digital collections. Publication and tweetage are scheduled in advance. Historical sources are adapted and updated for the current pandemic; please refer to each strip’s references on each post for further context.  Catch up with the series at https://epriego.blog/tag/the-lockdown-chronicles/.

The Lockdown Chronicles 12: Giovanni

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Giovanni has stories to tell.
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Giovanni Boccaccio (6 June 1313 – 21 December 1375) was an Italian writer, poet, correspondent of Petrarch, and an important Renaissance humanist. Boccaccio wrote a number of notable works, including The Decameron and On Famous Women. Sometimes nicknamed l’Umana commedia (“the Human comedy”), The Decameron is structured as a frame story containing 100 tales told by a group of seven young women and three young men sheltering in a secluded villa just outside Florence to escape the Black Death, which was afflicting the city. Boccaccio probably conceived of The Decameron after the epidemic of 1348, and completed it by 1353. [Wikipedia entry]

Text adapted from: McKinley, Kathryn (2019) “How the rich reacted to the bubonic plague has eerie similarities to today’s pandemic”, The Conversation, April 18, 2020.

Source images: Panel 1: The plague of Florence in 1348, as described in Boccaccio’s Decameron. Etching by L. Sabatelli after himself. Wellcome Images, Wellcome Collection. CC-BY 4.0; Panels 2-4: Portrait of Giovanni Boccaccio, engraving by Raffaello Sanzio Morghen, .ca 1822. Sourced from Sumner, Charles (1875) The Best Portraits in Engraving (5th ed.), New York City: Keppel & Co. OCLC: 17144657, via Wikimedia. Public Domain. This comic strip CC-BY-NC-SA.

References

Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University (Last Updated at 4/24/2020, 2:31:34 PM BST) COVID-19 Dashboard. Available at https://coronavirus.jhu.edu/map.html [Accessed 24 April 2020]

Boccaccio, Giovanni. The Decameron (1353) (ebook Release Date: December 3, 2007). Translated by John Payne. Project Gutenberg. Available at http://www.gutenberg.org/files/23700/23700-h/23700-h.htm [Accessed 24 April 2020]

McKinley, Kathryn (2020) “How the rich reacted to the bubonic plague has eerie similarities to today’s pandemic”, The Conversation, April 18, 2020. Available at https://theconversation.com/how-the-rich-reacted-to-the-bubonic-plague-has-eerie-similarities-to-todays-pandemic-135925 [Accessed 24 April 2020]

The plague of Florence in 1348, as described in Boccaccio’s Decameron. Etching by L. Sabatelli after himself. Wellcome Images, Wellcome Collection. Available at https://wellcomecollection.org/works/awnp6vyq  [Accessed 24 April 2020]

Portrait of Giovanni Boccaccio, engraving by Raffaello Sanzio Morghen, .ca 1822. Sourced from Sumner, Charles (1875) The Best Portraits in Engraving (5th ed.), New York City: Keppel & Co. OCLC: 17144657. Wikipedia entry: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giovanni_Boccaccio   [Accessed 24 April 2020]

The Lockdown Chronicles are made at night in candlelight, and publication and tweetage are scheduled in advance, not in real time. Catch up with the series at https://epriego.blog/tag/the-lockdown-chronicles/.

 

The Lockdown Chronicles 11: Gertrude

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Gertrude is a nurse in Manchester.
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With huge respect and gratitude for all the medical staff worldwide.

Gertrude Mary Giltinan (1881-1919) joined the Other Empire Force as a Voluntary Aid Detachment on the Joint War Committee and worked at the 2nd General Hospital in Manchester. A month after Gertrude signed up as a VAD, the influenza pandemic had reached an acute stage in Manchester. Gertrude died on the 19th November 1919 aged 38, from Spanish flu and subsequent pneumonia, which she contracted while nursing her patients. [Alice Low, Florence Nightingale Museum leaflet].

Text adapted from:  Low, Alice (2018) “Gertrude Giltinan (1881-1919)”, Nursing during WWI and the 1918 Influenza Pandemic, volunteer research leaflet, ©Florence Nightingale Museum; Blakey, Ashley, (20 April 2020), “Another 64 people lose their lives to Coronavirus in Greater Manchester”, Manchester Evening News; the Guardian Picture Essay (20 April 2020) “On the frontline: meet the NHS workers tackling coronavirus”; Marsh, Sarah (22 April 2020) “Doctors, nurses, porters, volunteers: the UK health workers who have died from Covid-19”, the Guardian.

Source images: Panel 1: Nicholls Hospital, Manchester, England. Transfer lithograph, 1879, after T. Worthington. Wellcome Images, Wellcome Collection. CC-BY 4.0; Panels 2-4: Photograph of Gertrude Giltinan, Voluntary Aid Detachments. Died of influenza contracted on duty 19 November 1919, WWC H2-169, Imperial War Museum, ©IWM, IWM Non-Commercial Licence. This comic strip CC-BY-NC-SA.

References

Florence Nightingale Museum, London (September 2018 to January 2020), “Spanish Flu: Nursing during history’s deadliest pandemic”. Available at https://www.florence-nightingale.co.uk/spanish-flu-nursing-during-historys-deadliest-pandemic/ [Accessed 22 April 2020]

Low, Alice (2018) “Gertrude Giltinan (1881-1919)”, Nursing during WWI and the 1918 Influenza Pandemic, volunteer research leaflet, Florence Nightingale Museum. Available as PDF at https://www.florence-nightingale.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/hlf-volunteer-research-leaflet.pdf [Accessed 22 April 2020]

Blakey, Ashley (20 April 2020), “Another 64 people lose their lives to Coronavirus in Greater Manchester”, Manchester Evening News. Available at https://www.manchestereveningnews.co.uk/news/greater-manchester-news/coronavirus-death-toll-greater-manchester-18119590 [Accessed 22 April 2020]

Elgot, Jessica (25 September 2015) “Police apologise for using sirens to settle ‘woo-woo’ or ‘nee-nah’ debate”. The Guardian. Available at
https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2015/sep/25/police-apologise-for-using-sirens-to-settle-woo-woo-or-nee-nah-debate [Accessed 22 April 2020]

The Guardian Picture Essay (20 April 2020) “On the frontline: meet the NHS workers tackling coronavirus”. Available at https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/apr/20/nhs-frontline-meet-people-risking-lives-tackle-coronavirus  [Accessed 22 April 2020]

Marsh, Sarah (22 April 2020) “Doctors, nurses, porters, volunteers: the UK health workers who have died from Covid-19”, the Guardian. Available at https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/apr/16/doctors-nurses-porters-volunteers-the-uk-health-workers-who-have-died-from-covid-19   [Accessed 22 April 2020]

Nicholls Hospital, Manchester, England. Transfer lithograph, 1879, after T. Worthington. Wellcome Images, Wellcome Collection. Available at https://wellcomecollection.org/works/n8urd46p/items?canvas=1&langCode=eng   [Accessed 22 April 2020]

Photograph of Gertrude Giltinan, Voluntary Aid Detachments. Died of influenza contracted on duty 19 November 1919, WWC H2-169, Imperial War Museum. Available at  https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205380418 [Accessed 22 April 2020]

 

The Lockdown Chronicles is a series of periodical comic strips made at night (in candlelight!) adapting and reusing openly-licensed or public domain items from online digital collections. Publication and tweetage are scheduled in advance. Historical sources are adapted and updated for the current pandemic; please refer to each strip’s references on each post for further context.  Catch up with the series at https://epriego.blog/tag/the-lockdown-chronicles/.

 

The Lockdown Chronicles 10: Josep

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Josep is bored at home.
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Josep Pla i Casadevall (8 March 1897, Palafrugell, Girona, Catalonia, Spain – 23 April 1981, Llofriu, Girona, Catalonia Spain) was a journalist and a popular author. As a journalist he worked in France, Italy, England, Germany and Russia, from where he wrote political and cultural chronicles in Catalan. [Wikipedia entry].

“In 1918, when Josep Pla was in Barcelona studying law, the Spanish flu broke out, the university shut down, and Pla went home to his parents in coastal Palafrugell, Spain. Aspiring to be a writer, not a lawyer, he resolved to hone his style by keeping a journal. In it he wrote about his family, local characters, visits to cafés; the quips, quarrels, ambitions, and amours of his friends; writers he liked and writers he didn’t; and the long contemplative walks he would take in the countryside under magnificent skies.” [The Paris Review]

Text adapted from: El quadern gris by Josep Pla (8 March 1897 – 23 April 1981), entry dated 8 March, 1918.

Source images: panels 1 and 3: “Aigua Xelida (Palafrugell, Girona)”, photo by Asier Sarasua Aranberri, via Flickr., CC-BY. Panels 2, 3 and 5: photograph of Josep Pla, 1918. Via bloQG (Xarxa de Mots 2009). Public Domain (?). This comic strip CC-BY-NC-SA.

 

References

Pa, J. Arxiu per al 8 març 2008, El quadern gris, bloQC, Xarxa de Mots 2009, available from: http://www.lletres.net/pla/QG/?m=20080308 [Accessed 20 April 2020]

Pla, J. “A Vitreous Vault”. [Excerpts from The Grey Notebook] The Paris Review, March 24, 2014. Available from https://www.theparisreview.org/blog/2014/03/24/a-vitreous-vault/ [Accessed 20 April 2020]

Badosa, C. (1991) “Josep Pla”. Catalan Literature Online. Available from: https://lletra.uoc.edu/en/author/josep-pla/ [Accessed 20 April 2020]

Fundació Josep Pla. “Ruta Josep Pla”. Available from: https://fundaciojoseppla.cat/ruta-josep-pla/palafrugell/ [Accessed 20 April 2020]

Miles, V. (2014) “The Weather Men”. The Paris Review, Mrch 25 2014. Available from: https://www.theparisreview.org/blog/2014/03/25/the-weather-men/ [Accessed 20 April 2020]

The Lockdown Chronicles is a series of periodical comic strips made at night (in candlelight!) adapting and reusing openly-licensed or public domain items from online digital collections. Publication and tweetage are scheduled in advance. Historical sources are adapted and updated for the current pandemic; please refer to each strip’s references on each post for further context.  Catch up with the series at https://epriego.blog/tag/the-lockdown-chronicles/.

The Lockdown Chronicles 9: Juana

 

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Juana is looking after her sick sisters.
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This is a humble homage.

Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, O.S.H. (English: Sister Joan Agnes of the Cross; 12 November 1648 – 17 April 1695), was a writer, philosopher, composer, poet of the Baroque school, and Hieronymite nun of New Spain (Mexico). [Wikipedia entry]

“In April of 1695, a plague hit the convent, with great loss of life. While looking after her sick sisters, she contracted the disease and died at four in the morning of 17th April, aged 46 years and five months.” (Kantaris 1992).

Text adapted from: “Reply to Sor Filotea de la Cruz” by Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz (1691). Source image: Portrait of Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz (1648-1695) by Miguel Cabrera (1695–1768), .ca 1750. Oil on canvas. Museo Nacional de Historia, México. Public Domain. This comic strip CC-BY-NC-SA.

 

References

Reply to Sor Filotea de la Cruz by Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz (1691), available at http://web.sonoma.edu/exed/olli/docs/course-handouts/winter-2017/whitecompanerasreplyweek2.pdf [PDF] [Accessed 19 April 2020]

Merrim, S. (2020).  “Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz”, Encyclopædia Britannica, April 13, 2020
availabe at https://www.britannica.com/biography/Sor-Juana-Ines-de-la-Cruz
[Accessed 19 April 2020]

Kantaris, G. (1992) Biography of Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz (Juana Ramírez de Asbaje)
Lecture for Part I SP1: Introduction to the Languages, Literatures and Cultures of the Spanish-speaking World, The Sor Juana Website, University of Cambridge. Available at http://www.latin-american.cam.ac.uk/culture/SorJuana/index.html#biography [Accessed 19 April 2020]

Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Museo Nacional de Historia, México. Colección. Available at https://mnh.inah.gob.mx/coleccion [Accessed 19 April 2020]

The Lockdown Chronicles is a series of periodical comic strips made at night (in candlelight!) adapting and reusing openly-licensed or public domain items from online digital collections. Publication and tweetage are scheduled in advance. Historical sources are adapted and updated for the current pandemic; please refer to each strip’s references on each post for further context.  Catch up with the series at https://epriego.blog/tag/the-lockdown-chronicles/.

The Lockdown Chronicles 8: Isaac (in full colour for the first time!)

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Isaac works from home.
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Sir Isaac Newton PRS (25 December 1642 – 20 March 1726/27). [Wikipedia entry] Woolsthorpe Manor is the place where Isaac Newton was born. In 1665-66, Isaac returned to Woolsthorpe leaving behind plague-hit Cambridge, to spend what he called his ‘Year of Wonders’. [National Trust].

Source Text: Newton, I. (1662-1667). Fitzwilliam Notebook. Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, UK. Via The Newton Project.

Source images: Panel 1: Woolsthorpe Manor, ©National Trust Images. Panels 2, 3 and 4: Sir Isaac Newton by Sir Godfrey Kneller, Bt. Oil on canvas, feigned oval, 1702. NPG 2881 ©National Portrait Gallery, London. CC-BY.

 

References

Sir Isaac Newton – National Portrait Gallery,  https://www.npg.org.uk/collections/search/portrait/mw04660/Sir-Isaac-Newton [Accessed 17 April 2020]

Newton, I. (1662-1667). Fitzwilliam Notebook. Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, UK. Via The Newton Project. Available at  http://www.newtonproject.ox.ac.uk/view/texts/diplomatic/ALCH00069 [Accessed 17 April 2020]

National Trust. “Year of Wonders 1665-1667”. Woolsthorpe Manor. Available at https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/woolsthorpe-manor/features/year-of-wonders [Accessed 17 April 2020]

National Trust. Woolsthorpe Manor, Lincolnshire (Accredited Museum) Collection. Available at http://www.nationaltrustcollections.org.uk/place/woolsthorpe-manor [Accessed 17 April 2020]

Cambridge Digital Library. Newton Papers. Available at https://cudl.lib.cam.ac.uk/collections/newton/1 [Accessed 17 April 2020]

The Lockdown Chronicles are made at night in candlelight, and publication and tweetage are scheduled in advance, not in real time. Catch up with the series at https://epriego.blog/tag/the-lockdown-chronicles/.