The Lockdown Chronicles 34: Susan

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Susan chips in.
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Susan Sontag (1933–2004) was an American writer, filmmaker, philosopher, teacher, and political activist. She wrote extensively about photography, culture and media, cancer, AIDS and illness, human rights, and other topics [Wikipedia entry].

Text sources: Text sources: speech balloon in panel 1, United Nations Secretary-General Antonio Guterres, May 8, 2020, as quoted by Human Rights Watch (12 May 2020); captions in panels 1-3: Human Rights Watch (12 May 2020) Covid-19 Fueling Anti-Asian Racism and Xenophobia Worldwide, available via https://www.hrw.org/; speech balloons in panels 2-4: Sontag, Susan (1989). AIDS and Its Metaphors. Farrar, Straus and Giroux, New York.

Source image: photograph of Susan Sontag in her home in 1979, CC-BY Lynn Gilbert, via Wikimedia Commons. © Lynn Gilbert. This comic strip CC-BY-NC-SA

References

Human Rights Watch (12 May 2020) Covid-19 Fueling Anti-Asian Racism and Xenophobia Worldwide, available via https://www.hrw.org/news/2020/05/12/covid-19-fueling-anti-asian-racism-and-xenophobia-worldwide [Accessed 28 May 2020]

Sontag, S. (1989) AIDS and Its Metaphors. Farrar, Straus and Giroux, New York. Scanned version available via Monoskop at https://monoskop.org/File:Susan_Sontag_AIDS_and_Its_Metaphors_1989.pdf [PDF]. [Accessed 28 May 2020]

Gilbert, L. (1979).Photograph of Susan Sontag in her home. CC-BY Lynn Gilbert, via Wikimedia Commons at https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Susan_Sontag_1979_%C2%A9Lynn_Gilbert.jpg  © Lynn Gilbert. [Accessed 28 May 2020]

The Lockdown Chronicles is a series of periodical comic strips made at night (in candlelight!) adapting and reusing openly-licensed or public domain items from online digital collections. Publication and tweetage are scheduled in advance. Historical sources are adapted and updated for the current pandemic; please refer to each strip’s references on each post for further context.  Catch up with the series at https://epriego.blog/tag/the-lockdown-chronicles/.

 

The Lockdown Chronicles 33: Emmeline

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Emmeline is on FaceTime.
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Emmeline Pankhurst (1858–1928) was a British political activist best remembered for organising the UK suffragette movement and helping women win the right to vote [Wikipedia entry].

Text sources: Institute for Fiscal Studies (27 May 2020) “How are mothers and fathers balancing work and family under lockdown?”, available from https://www.ifs.org.uk/; Ascher, D. (27 May 2020) “Coronavirus: ‘Mums do most childcare and chores in lockdown”. BBC News; Emmeline Pankhurst’s “Freedom or death”, speech delivered in Hartford, Connecticut on November 13 1913, via The Guardian Great speeches of the 20th century, 27 April 2007.

Source image: Matzene, C. (1913) Emmeline Pankhurst. England United States, 1913. Nov. [Photograph] Women of Protest: Photographs from the Records of the National Woman’s Party, Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Public Domain. This comic strip CC-BY-NC-SA.

References

Institute for Fiscal Studies (27 May 2020) “How are mothers and fathers balancing work and family under lockdown?” Available at https://www.ifs.org.uk/publications/14860 [Accessed 27 May 2020]

Ascher, D. (27 May 2020) “Coronavirus: ‘Mums do most childcare and chores in lockdown”. BBC News. Available at https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-52808930 [Accessed 27 May 2020]

Pankhurstm E. (1913) “Freedom or death”, speech delivered in Hartford, Connecticut on November 13 1913, via The Guardian Great speeches of the 20th century, 27 April 2007. Available via https://www.theguardian.com/theguardian/2007/apr/27/greatspeeches [Accessed 27 May 2020]

Matzene, C. (1913) Emmeline Pankhurst. England United States, 1913. Nov. [Photograph] Women of Protest: Photographs from the Records of the National Woman’s Party, Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Retrieved from https://www.loc.gov/item/mnwp000042/ [Accessed 27 May 2020]

 

The Lockdown Chronicles is a series of periodical comic strips made at night (in candlelight!) adapting and reusing openly-licensed or public domain items from online digital collections. Publication and tweetage are scheduled in advance. Historical sources are adapted and updated for the current pandemic; please refer to each strip’s references on each post for further context.  Catch up with the series at https://epriego.blog/tag/the-lockdown-chronicles/.

The Lockdown Chronicles 32: Eglantyne

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Eglantyne gives a seminar.
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Eglantyne Jebb (1876–1928) was a British social reformer and teacher who co-founded Save the Children in 1919 to relieve the effects of famine in Austria-Hungary and Germany. She drafted the document that became the Declaration of the Rights of the Child (Mulley 2009) [Wikipedia entry].

Text sources in addition to those referenced in the caption footnotes: Mulley, C. (2009) The woman who saved the children: a biography of Eglantyne Jebb founder of Save the Children. Oxford: Oneworld; Adams, R. and Sample, I. (22 May 2020) “Ministers rejected school reopening plan recommended by Sage experts”. The Guardian; Weale, S. (15 May 2020). “Call for free school meals during half-term and summer in England”. The Guardian; Guardian staff and agencies (26 May 2020) “Global report: ‘disaster’ looms for millions of children as WHO warns of second peak”. The Guardian.

Source image: photograph of Eglantyne Jebb, photographer unknown, via Save the Children. License unknown. This comic strip CC-BY-NC-SA.

References

Office for National Statistics, “Latest data and analysis on coronavirus (COVID-19) in the UK and its effect on the economy and society.” Available at  https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/healthandsocialcare/conditionsanddiseases [Accessed 26 May 2020]

Change.org Petition: “Boris Johnson: Don’t take away lunches for 1​.​3 million kids on Free School Meals”. Available at https://www.change.org/p/boris-johnson-boris-johnson-don-t-take-away-lunches-for-1-3-million-kids-on-free-school-meals  [Accessed 26 May 2020]

Save the Children Coronavirus Appeal, available at https://www.savethechildren.org.uk/how-you-can-help/emergencies/donate-coronavirus-crisis [Accessed 26 May 2020]

Mulley, C. (2009) The woman who saved the children: a biography of Eglantyne Jebb founder of Save the Children. Oxford: Oneworld

Adams, R. and Sample, I. (22 May 2020) “Ministers rejected school reopening plan recommended by Sage experts”. The Guardian. Available at https://www.theguardian.com/education/2020/may/22/ministers-rejected-school-reopening-plan-recommended-by-sage-experts [Accessed 26 May 2020]

Weale, S. (15 May 2020). “Call for free school meals during half-term and summer in England”. The Guardian. Available at https://www.theguardian.com/education/2020/may/15/call-for-free-school-meals-during-half-term-summer-england [Accessed 26 May 2020]

Guardian staff and agencies (26 May 2020) “Global report: ‘disaster’ looms for millions of children as WHO warns of second peak”. The Guardian. Available at https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/may/26/global-report-disaster-looms-for-millions-of-children-as-who-warns-of-second-peak [Accessed 26 May 2020]

Photograph of Eglantyne Jebb, photographer unknown, via Save the Children, via alt.cardiff, 5 November 2019, available at https://www.jomec.co.uk/altcardiff/no-logo/save-the-children-continues-centenary-celebrations-at-llandaff-cathedral [Accessed 26 May 2020]

The Lockdown Chronicles is a series of periodical comic strips made at night (in candlelight!) adapting and reusing openly-licensed or public domain items from online digital collections. Publication and tweetage are scheduled in advance. Historical sources are adapted and updated for the current pandemic; please refer to each strip’s references on each post for further context.  Catch up with the series at https://epriego.blog/tag/the-lockdown-chronicles/.

The Lockdown Chronicles 31: Dr Doyle

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Dr Doyle has lunch.
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Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle (22 May 1859 – 7 July 1930), British writer and medical doctor, lived in South Norwood with his family 1891-1894. His first wife Louisa, was sometimes called “Touie”; she died in 1906. [Wikipedia entry] According to The Conan Doyle Estate, “the success of Sherlock Holmes made Conan Doyle a public figure in the 1890s, along with stories about medical practice’s social and ethical issues.” The Boer War (1899-1902) “crystalized his thinking about public issues, and role as a public man.” [The Conan Doyle Estate]

Text sources: Weaver, M., Dodd, V., and MacInnes, P. (23 May 2020) “Dominic Cummings clearly broke rules, says ex-police chief”, the Guardian; Syal, R., Weaver, M., and Walker, P. (24 May 2020) “Johnson’s defence of Cummings sparks anger from allies and opponents alike”, the Guardian; The Conan Doyle Estate, “Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Campaigner”, at https://arthurconandoyle.co.uk/campaigner.

Source images: panel 1: digital photograph of house of Sr Arthur Conan Doyle by Lucy Morris (24 May 2020), via Twitter, used with permission; panels 2-4: photograph of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle by Herbert Rose Barraud; carbon print on card mount; original at the National Portrait Gallery, London. Reused file via Wikimedia Commons, Public Domain in its country of origin and other countries and areas where the copyright term is the author’s life plus 100 years or fewer. The Conan Doyle Estate Ltd owns the trademark and common law rights in the name and image of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in the USA, European Union, U.K. and many other countries around the world. This comic strip CC-BY-NC-SA.

References

Weaver, M., Dodd, V., and MacInnes, P. (23 May 2020) “Dominic Cummings clearly broke rules, says ex-police chief”, the Guardian; available at https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2020/may/23/dominic-cummings-no-10-accused-of-covering-up-lockdown-breach [Accessed 25 May 2020]

Syal, R., Weaver, M., and Walker, P. (24 May 2020) “Johnson’s defence of Cummings sparks anger from allies and opponents alike”, the Guardian; available at https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2020/may/24/boris-johnson-defence-dominic-cummings-anger-from-allies-and-opponents-alike [Accessed 25 May 2020]

The Conan Doyle Estate, “Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Campaigner”, available at https://arthurconandoyle.co.uk/campaigner.[Accessed 25 May 2020]

English Heritage, “Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1859 – 1930)”. Blue Plaques. Available at https://www.english-heritage.org.uk/visit/blue-plaques/arthur-conan-doyle/  [Accessed 25 May 2020]

Travelling moose (@travellingmoose) (24 May 2020),  digital photograph of house of Sr Arthur Conan Doyle’s house in South Norwood, available at https://twitter.com/travellingmoose/status/1264554620275351552/photo/1 [Accessed 25 May 2020]

Barraud, H.R. Photograph of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in 1893, carbon print on card mount; original at the National Portrait Gallery, London. Reused file via Wikimedia Commons, available at https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Arthur_Conan_Doyle_by_Herbert_Rose_Barraud_1893.jpg  [Accessed 25 May 2020]

 

The Lockdown Chronicles is a series of periodical comic strips made at night (in candlelight!) adapting and reusing openly-licensed or public domain items from online digital collections. Publication and tweetage are scheduled in advance. Historical sources are adapted and updated for the current pandemic; please refer to each strip’s references on each post for further context.  Catch up with the series at https://epriego.blog/tag/the-lockdown-chronicles/.

The Lockdown Chronicles 30: Eric

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Eric is a newsreader.
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Eric Arthur Blair (1903–1950), better known by his pen name George Orwell, fled London’s smog for Jura on 10 April 1947 mostly for health reasons, where he worked on Nineteen Eighty-Four (1949). During that period he would be diagnosed with tuberculosis (Taylor 2003) [Wikipedia entry]

The masses never revolt of their own accord, and they never revolt merely because they are oppressed. Indeed, so long as they are not permitted to have standards of comparison, they never even become aware that they are oppressed. The recurrent economic crises of past times were totally unnecessary and are not now permitted to happen, but other and equally large dislocations can and do happen without having political results, because there is no way in which discontent can become articulate.”

-George Orwell, Nineteen Eighty-Four (1949)

Text sources: Taylor, D.J. (2003) Orwell: The Life. Henry Holt and Company; Sabbagh, D., Perraudin, F., Stewart, H., and Walker, P. (20 May 2020) “UK plans for contact-tracing in doubt as app not ready until June”. The Guardian; Hawkins, R (20 May 2020) “Coronavirus: Serco apologises for sharing contact tracers’ email addresses”. BBC Radio 4 Today. BBC News;  Perraudin, F. (20 May 2020) “No one had any idea’: Contact tracers lack knowledge about Covid-19 job”. The Guardian; Culnane, C., and Teague, V. (19 May 2020) Security analysis of the NHS COVID-19 App, StateofIT.

Source image: photograph of George Orwell at the BBC, photographer unknown, 1940, via Wikimedia Commons. Public Domain. This comic strip CC-BY-NC-SA.

 

References

Taylor, D.J. (2003) Orwell: The Life. Henry Holt and Company

Orwell, G. (1949) Nineteen Eighty-Four, via Internet Archive, available at https://archive.org/details/Orwell1984preywo/mode/2up [Accessed 20 May 2020]

Culnane, C., and Teague, V. (19 May 2020) Security analysis of the NHS COVID-19 App, available via  https://www.stateofit.com/UKContactTracing/ [Accessed 20 May 2020]

Sabbagh, D., Perraudin, F., Stewart, H., and Walker, P. (20 May 2020) “UK plans for contact-tracing in doubt as app not ready until June”. The Guardian; available at https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/may/20/uk-plans-for-contact-tracing-in-doubt-as-app-not-ready-until-june [Accessed 20 May 2020]

Hawkins, R (20 May 2020) “Coronavirus: Serco apologises for sharing contact tracers’ email addresses”. BBC Radio 4 Today. BBC News; available at https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-52732818# [Accessed 20 May 2020]

Perraudin, F. (20 May 2020) “No one had any idea’: Contact tracers lack knowledge about Covid-19 job”. The Guardian; available at https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/may/20/no-one-had-any-idea-contact-tracers-lack-knowledge-about-covid-19-job [Accessed 20 May 2020]

Photograph of George Orwell at the BBC, photographer unknown, 1940, via Wikimedia Commons, available at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Orwell#/media/File:George-orwell-BBC.jpg [Accessed 20 May 2020]

 

The Lockdown Chronicles is a series of periodical comic strips made at night (in candlelight!) adapting and reusing openly-licensed or public domain items from online digital collections. Publication and tweetage are scheduled in advance. Historical sources are adapted and updated for the current pandemic; please refer to each strip’s references on each post for further context.  Catch up with the series at https://epriego.blog/tag/the-lockdown-chronicles/.

The Lockdown Chronicles 29: Mary Jane

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Mary Jane wanted to be a nurse.
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Mary Seacole (née Mary Jane Grant, 1805, Kingston, Jamaica – 1881, London, UK), businesswoman who provided sustenance and care for British soldiers at the battlefront during the Crimean War. Despite her nursing experience during a cholera epidemic in Panama and in Jamaica caring for yellow fever victims, her offers to serve as an army nurse were refused. She attributed her rejection to racial prejudice (Seacole 1857: 74-80). After her death she fell into obscurity but in 2004 took first place in the 100 Great Black Britons poll in the UK. [Wikipedia entry] [Britannica entry]

In a 2014 letter to the Guardian, Professor Lynn McDonald, editor of the Collected Works of Florence Nightingale, wrote of Seacole that “[y]es, she was kind and generous, to ordinary soldiers as well as officers. These are good qualities, but not the sort that saves lives or pioneers health care” (Monday 27 October 2014).

It seems to me, as a humble reader, that all these years after her death Mary Seacole keeps suffering from the rejection she described experiencing in her 1857 autobiography (see chapter VIII).

Text sources: Syal, R. (18 May 2020) “Points-based UK immigration bill passes initial Commons stage”. The Guardian; Sparrow, A., Murphy, S. and Perraudin, F. (19 May 2020) “UK coronavirus live: excess deaths reached almost 55,000 in early May, says ONS”. The Guardian; Sample, I. (18 May 2020) “Over three-quarters of BAME doctors fear they will contract Covid-19”. The Guardian; Seacole, M. (2003)[1857] Wonderful Adventures of Mrs. Seacole in Many Lands, via Project Gutenberg.

Source image: Photograph of Mary Seacole c. 1873, unknown photographer, Maull & Company London, in the public domain in its country of origin and other countries and areas where the copyright term is the author’s life plus 70 years or fewer, via Wikimedia Commons. This comic strip CC-BY-NC-SA.

References

Syal, R. (18 May 2020) “Points-based UK immigration bill passes initial Commons stage”. The Guardian; https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2020/may/18/points-based-uk-immigration-bill-passed-by-parliament [Accessed 19 May 2020].

Sparrow, A., Murphy, S. and Perraudin, F. (19 May 2020) “UK coronavirus live: excess deaths reached almost 55,000 in early May, says ONS”. The Guardian; Available at https://www.theguardian.com/world/live/2020/may/19/uk-coronavirus-live-latest-updates [Accessed 19 May 2020].

Sample, I. (18 May 2020) “Over three-quarters of BAME doctors fear they will contract Covid-19”. The Guardian; Available at https://www.theguardian.com/society/2020/may/18/over-three-quarters-of-bame-doctors-fear-they-will-contract-covid-19 [Accessed 19 May 2020].

Seacole, M. (2003)[1857] Wonderful Adventures of Mrs. Seacole in Many Lands, via Project Gutenberg. Available at http://www.gutenberg.org/files/23031/23031-h/23031-h.htm [Accessed 19 May 2020].

Photograph of Mary Seacole c.1873, unknown photographer, Maull & Company London, via Wikimedia Commons, available at https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Seacole_photo.jpg [Accessed 19 May 2020].

The Lockdown Chronicles is a series of periodical comic strips made at night (in candlelight!) adapting and reusing openly-licensed or public domain items from online digital collections. Publication and tweetage are scheduled in advance. Historical sources are adapted and updated for the current pandemic; please refer to each strip’s references on each post for further context.  Catch up with the series at https://epriego.blog/tag/the-lockdown-chronicles/.

The Lockdown Chronicles 28: Ignaz

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[I have self-embargoed this comic strip while some peer-review takes place]

Great works are those which awaken our genius, great men are those who give them form”.

– Louis-Ferdinand Céline, The Life and Works of Ignaz Philipp Semmelweis (1818–1865) (1924)

 

Ignaz Philipp Semmelweis (1818–1865) was a Hungarian-Austrian physician now recognised as an early pioneer of antiseptic procedures; his observations conflicted with the established scientific and medical opinions of the time and his ideas were rejected by the medical community. [Wikipedia entry].

The Semmelweis reflex or “Semmelweis effect” describes the reflex-like tendency to reject new evidence or new knowledge because it contradicts established norms, beliefs, or paradigms. [Wikipedia entry] [Mortell et al 2013]

I learned about the life and work of Semmelweis by reading Semmelweis (Atlas Press, 2008) by the French novelist Louis-Ferdinand Céline (1894 – 1961), who was also a physician (gracias, maestro Antonio Saborit). By 1923, Céline had almost completed his medical degree. His doctoral thesis, The Life and Works of Ignaz Philipp Semmelweis (1818–1865) completed in 1924, is actually considered to be Céline’s first literary work. Ignaz Semmelweis’s contribution to medicine “was immense and, according to Céline, was directly proportional to the misery of his life.” In 1924 Céline took up the post of intern at a Paris maternity hospital.  The first public edition was from 1936. [Wikipedia entry].

Text sources: Semmelweis, I. (1983) Etiology, Concept and Prophylaxis of Childbed Fever, translated by Carter, K. Codell, University of Wisconsin Press, via Internet Archive; Mason, R. (5 May 2020) “Boris Johnson boasted of shaking hands on day Sage warned not to”, the Guardian; Pogrebna, G. & Kharlamov, A. (2020) The Impact of Cross-Cultural Differences in Handwashing Patterns on the COVID-19 Outbreak Magnitude. 10.13140/RG.2.2.23764.96649; Gammon, J., & Hunt, J. (2018). The neglected element of hand hygiene – significance of hand drying […]. Journal of Infection Prevention, https://doi.org/10.1177/1757177418815549/.

Source image: Portrait of Ignaz Philipp Semmelweis, Wellcome Collection. CC BY 4.0. This comic strip CC-BY-NC-SA.

References

Semmelweis, I.P. (1983) Etiology, Concept and Prophylaxis of Childbed Fever, translated by Carter, K. Codell, University of Wisconsin Press, via Internet Archive; available at https://archive.org/details/etiologyconcepta0000unse [Accessed 17 May 2020]

Céline, L.F. (2008) [Doctoral thesis, 1927] Semmelweis. Translated by John Harman. London: Atlas Press

Mason, R. (5 May 2020) “Boris Johnson boasted of shaking hands on day Sage warned not to”, the Guardian; available at https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2020/may/05/boris-johnson-boasted-of-shaking-hands-on-day-sage-warned-not-to [Accessed 17 May 2020]

Pogrebna, G. & Kharlamov, A. (2020) The Impact of Cross-Cultural Differences in Handwashing Patterns on the COVID-19 Outbreak Magnitude. 10.13140/RG.2.2.23764.96649 [Accessed 17 May 2020]

Gammon, J., & Hunt, J. (2018). The neglected element of hand hygiene – significance of hand drying […]. Journal of Infection Prevention, https://doi.org/10.1177/1757177418815549  [Accessed 17 May 2020]

Mortell, M., Balkhy, H. H., Tannous, E. B., & Jong, M. T. (2013). Physician ‘defiance’ towards hand hygiene compliance: Is there a theory-practice-ethics gap?. Journal of the Saudi Heart Association, 25(3), 203–208. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsha.2013.04.003 [Accessed 17 May 2020] h

Portrait of Ignaz Philipp Semmelweis [1818 – 1865], Hungarian-Austrian physician. Wellcome Collection. Available via https://wellcomecollection.org/works/jjas5444 [Accessed 17 May 2020]

The Lockdown Chronicles is a series of periodical comic strips made at night (in candlelight!) adapting and reusing openly-licensed or public domain items from online digital collections. Publication and tweetage are scheduled in advance. Historical sources are adapted and updated for the current pandemic; please refer to each strip’s references on each post for further context.  Catch up with the series at https://epriego.blog/tag/the-lockdown-chronicles/.

The Lockdown Chronicles 27: Ludwig

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Ludwig is stressed.
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On the advice of his doctor, Ludwig van Beethoven (1770–1827) moved to Heiligenstadt from April to October 1802 in an attempt to come to terms with his hearing loss. There he wrote the Heiligenstadt Testament (1802), a letter to his brothers which records his thoughts on his growing deafness and his resolution to continue living for and through his art (Cooper 1996: 169-172) [Wikipedia entry].

Text sources in addition to those in the footnote captions: Beethoven’s Heiligenstadt Testament (6 October 1802), via Gilbert, J.V. (1998) “E85.2073: Music Literature: The Classical Period”, NYU; Cooper, B., ed. (1996) The Beethoven Companion. Thames and Hudson; Saba, S. (22 April 2020) “How home working leaves deaf people out of the loop during coronavirus”, the Guardian.

Source image: “Beethoven’s walk in nature”, by Julius Schmid, original at Beethoven-Haus, Bonn, file used via Wikimedia Commons; Public Domain where the copyright term is the author’s life plus 70 years or fewer. This comic strip CC-BY-NC-SA.

References

Austria Official Travel Portal, “Up-to-date information on the Coronavirus situation “, available at https://www.austria.info/en/service-and-facts/coronavirus-information/  [Accessed 14 May 2020]

Action on Hearing Loss (Last updated 12 May 2020) “Managing tinnitus and stress during the Covid-19 (coronavirus) outbreak”, available at  https://beta.actiononhearingloss.org.uk/coronavirus-response/managing-tinnitus-and-stress-during-the-covid-19-coronavirus-outbreak/  [Accessed 14 May 2020]

Beethoven’s Heiligenstadt Testament (6 October 1802), via Gilbert, J.V. (1998) “E85.2073: Music Literature: The Classical Period”, NYU; available at https://www.nyu.edu/classes/gilbert/classic/heiligenstadt.html  [Accessed 14 May 2020]

Cooper, B., ed. (1996) The Beethoven Companion. Thames and Hudson.

Saba, S. (22 April 2020) “How home working leaves deaf people out of the loop during coronavirus”, the Guardian. https://www.theguardian.com/society/2020/apr/22/how-home-working-leaves-deaf-people-out-loop-coronavirus Available at [Accessed 14 May 2020]

“Beethoven’s walk in nature”, by Julius Schmid, original at Beethoven-Haus, Bonn, file used via Wikimedia Commons at https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Beethoven_walk.jpg [Accessed 14 May 2020]

 

The Lockdown Chronicles is a series of periodical comic strips made at night (in candlelight!) adapting and reusing openly-licensed or public domain items from online digital collections. Publication and tweetage are scheduled in advance. Historical sources are adapted and updated for the current pandemic; please refer to each strip’s references on each post for further context.  Catch up with the series at https://epriego.blog/tag/the-lockdown-chronicles/.

The Lockdown Chronicles 26: Mary S

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Mary calls a friend.
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Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley (1797–1851) was an English novelist, best known for writing Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus (1818). She also edited and promoted the works of her husband, the Romantic poet and philosopher Percy Bysshe Shelley. Her father was the political philosopher William Godwin and her mother was the philosopher and feminist Mary Wollstonecraft. Mary and her extended family experienced both financial troubles and mental distress. She did not become financially independent until Sir Timothy Shelley died in April 1844, and her son Percy inherited his father’s legacies. [Wikipedia Entry] [University of Saskatchewan] [UPenn]

Text sources in addition to those in the footnote captions: Shelley, Mary (1823) Valperga: or, The Life and Adventures of Castruccio, Prince of Lucca, via Project Gutenberg Australia, available at http://gutenberg.net.au/ebooks06/0606801h.html/; Banks J, Karjalainen H, Propper C. (2020) “Recessions and health: the long-term health consequences of responses to the coronavirus”, available from: https://www.ifs.org.uk/publications/14799/.

Source image: Portrait of Mary Shelley (1840) by Richard Rothwell (1800–1868), image file via Wikimedia Commons. This work is in the public domain in its country of origin and other countries and areas where the copyright term is the author’s life plus 100 years or fewer. The original is at the National Portrait Gallery, London. This comic strip CC-BY-NC-SA; full context at epriego.blog

References

Shelley, M. (1823) Valperga: or, The Life and Adventures of Castruccio, Prince of Lucca, via Project Gutenberg Australia, available at http://gutenberg.net.au/ebooks06/0606801h.html/ [Accessed 13 May 2020]

English Heritage, “Shelley, Mary (1797–1851)”, available at https://www.english-heritage.org.uk/visit/blue-plaques/mary-shelley/ [Accessed 13 May 2020]

Warder, K. (1999) [?] “A Brief Biography of Mary Shelley”, in Frankenstein: a hypertext resource. Updated and reconceived by Joel Deshaye and Dave Mitchell at the University of Saskatchewan, available at https://www.usask.ca/english/frank/biostart.htm [Accessed 13 May 2020]

Curran, S. (n.d). “Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley”, in Frankenstein; or, the Modern Prometheus, by Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley. The Pennsylvania Electronic Edition. Available at http://knarf.english.upenn.edu/MShelley/bio.html [Accessed 13 May 2020]

Banks J, Karjalainen H, Propper C. (2020) “Recessions and health: the long-term health consequences of responses to the coronavirus”, available from: https://www.ifs.org.uk/publications/14799/ [Accessed 13 May 2020]

Johns Hopkins University Coronavirus Resource Center, available at https://coronavirus.jhu.edu/ [Accessed 13 May 2020]

Mental Health Foundation (1 May 2020) “The COVID-19 pandemic, financial inequality and mental health”, available at https://www.mentalhealth.org.uk/our-work/research/coronavirus-mental-health-pandemic/covid-19-inequality-briefing  [Accessed 13 May 2020]

Joyce, R and Xu, X. (6 April 2020) “Sector shutdowns during the coronavirus crisis: which workers are most exposed?” Institute for Fiscal Studies, available at https://www.ifs.org.uk/publications/14791 [Accessed 13 May 2020]

The Lockdown Chronicles is a series of periodical comic strips made at night (in candlelight!) adapting and reusing openly-licensed or public domain items from online digital collections. Publication and tweetage are scheduled in advance. Historical sources are adapted and updated for the current pandemic; please refer to each strip’s references on each post for further context.  Catch up with the series at https://epriego.blog/tag/the-lockdown-chronicles/.

The Lockdown Chronicles 25: Ralph

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Ralph gives another online lecture.
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Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882) was an American essayist, lecturer, philosopher, and poet who led the transcendentalist movement of the mid-19th century. He was seen as a champion of individualism and a prescient critic of the countervailing pressures of society, and he disseminated his thoughts through dozens of published essays and more than 1,500 public lectures across the United States. On July 15, 1838, Emerson was invited to Divinity Hall, Harvard Divinity School, to deliver the school’s graduation address, which came to be known as the “Divinity School Address”. [Wikipedia entry]

Emerson loved nature and outdoor activities but also appreciated solitude indoors: “the solitary knows the essence of the thought, the scholar in society only its fair face.” [Ralph Waldo Emerson House]

Text sources: Harvard Divinity School (11 May 2011), HDS Coronavirus Update, https://hds.harvard.edu/about/hds-coronavirus-update (accessed 12 May 2020); The New York Times, (11-12May 2020) “Fauci to Warn Senate of ‘Needless Suffering and Death’”, NYT.com; Emerson, Ralph Waldo (1904) “Nature” and “V. Education”, in The Complete Works., Vol. X. Lectures and Biographical Sketches, Bartleby.com.

Image sources: Panel 1: photograph of the home of Ralph Waldo Emerson in Concorde, ©2018 Ralph Waldo Emerson Memorial Association; panels 2-4: Ralph Waldo Emerson, head-and-shoulders portrait, facing right, engraved and published in 1878 by S.A. Schoff from an original drawing by Sam W. Rowse, Library of Congress, no known restrictions on publication. This comic strip CC-BY-NC-SA.

References

Harvard Divinity School (11 May 2011), HDS Coronavirus Update, available at https://hds.harvard.edu/about/hds-coronavirus-update [accessed 12 May 2020]

The New York Times, (11-12May 2020) “Fauci to Warn Senate of ‘Needless Suffering and Death’”, available at https://www.nytimes.com/2020/05/11/us/coronavirus-updates.htm  [accessed 12 May 2020]

Emerson, Ralph Waldo (1904) “V. Education”, in The Complete Works., Vol. X. Lectures and Biographical Sketches, available at https://www.bartleby.com/90/1005.html [accessed 12 May 2020]

Quote from “Nature” (1836) sourced from Ralph Waldo Emerson House, available at https://www.ralphwaldoemersonhouse.org/ [accessed 12 May 2020]

Skallerup Bessette, Lee, Chick, Nancy, and Friberg, Jennifer (1 May 2020) “5 Myths About Remote Teaching in the Covid-19 Crisis”, The Chronicle of Higher Education, available at https://www.chronicle.com/article/5-Myths-About-Remote-Teaching/248688?cid=cp275  [accessed 12 May 2020]

Photograph of the home of Ralph Waldo Emerson in Concorde sourced from Ralph Waldo Emerson House, available at https://www.ralphwaldoemersonhouse.org/ [accessed 12 May 2020]

Ralph Waldo Emerson, head-and-shoulders portrait, facing right, engraved and published in 1878 by S.A. Schoff from an original drawing by Sam W. Rowse, Library of Congress, available at https://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2005677205/ [accessed 12 May 2020]

The Lockdown Chronicles is a series of periodical comic strips made at night (in candlelight!) adapting and reusing openly-licensed or public domain items from online digital collections. Publication and tweetage are scheduled in advance. Historical sources are adapted and updated for the current pandemic; please refer to each strip’s references on each post for further context.  Catch up with the series at https://epriego.blog/tag/the-lockdown-chronicles/.

The Lockdown Chronicles 24: Herman

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Herman listens to the news.
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This comic strip is dedicated to mi maestro Antonio Saborit.

“Bartleby, the Scrivener: A Story of Wall Street” (1853) is (of course) a short story by Herman Melville (1819–1891) where a Wall Street clerk, after an initial bout of hard work, refuses to make any task required of him, saying “I would prefer not to.” When the narrator stops by the office one Sunday morning, he discovers that Bartleby has started living there.[Wikipedia entry] [Internet Archive] Melville stayed in London at 25 Craven Street in Charing Cross at the end of 1849. [English Heritage]

Text sources: BBC News (10 May 2020) “Coronavirus: Boris Johnson to launch Covid-19 alert system”, bbc.co.uk; Blackall, Molly and Busby, Mattha (10 May 2020) “Confusion over government’s new slogan”, UK coronavirus live, the Guardian, guardian.com; Melville, Herman (1853) “Bartleby, the Scrivener: A Story of Wall Street”, via the Internet Archive.

Source images: panels 1-2: Brown, Elliott (October 16, 2009), “25 Craven Street, London – former home of Herman Melville”, digital photograph, via Flickr, CC-BY; panels 3-4: A portrait of Herman Melville (1870) by Joseph Oriel Eaton (1829–1875), Houghton Library, Harvard University, Modern Books and Manuscripts., via Wikimedia Commons. Public Domain. This comic strip is CC-BY-NC-SA

References

Melville, Herman (1853) “Bartleby, the Scrivener: A Story of Wall Street”, via the Internet Archive, available at http://www.gutenberg.org/cache/epub/11231/pg11231-images.html [Accessed 10 May 2020]

English Heritage, Melville, Herman (1819–1891), available at  https://www.english-heritage.org.uk/visit/blue-plaques/herman-melville/ [Accessed 10 May 2020]

BBC News (10 May 2020) “Coronavirus: Boris Johnson to launch Covid-19 alert system”, available at https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-52602635 [Accessed 10 May 2020]

Blackall, Molly and Busby, Mattha (10 May 2020) “Confusion over government’s new slogan”, UK coronavirus live, the Guardian, available at https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/live/2020/may/10/uk-coronavirus-live-boris-johnson-to-announce-covid-19-alert-system  [Accessed 10 May 2020]

Brown, Elliott (October 16, 2009), “25 Craven Street, London – former home of Herman Melville”, digital photograph, available via Flickr at https://www.flickr.com/photos/ell-r-brown/4026669957 [Accessed 10 May 2020]

Eaton, Joseph Oriel (1870) A portrait of Herman Melville. Via Houghton Library, Harvard University, Modern Books and Manuscripts., available via Wikimedia Commons at https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Herman_Melville_by_Joseph_O_Eaton.jpg [Accessed 10 May 2020]

 

The Lockdown Chronicles is a series of periodical comic strips made at night (in candlelight!) adapting and reusing openly-licensed or public domain items from online digital collections. Publication and tweetage are scheduled in advance. Historical sources are adapted and updated for the current pandemic; please refer to each strip’s references on each post for further context.  Catch up with the series at https://epriego.blog/tag/the-lockdown-chronicles/.

The Lockdown Chronicles 23: Audre

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Click on the image below to read the comic strip in full size. Sources and references on this post under the comic strip below.

 

Audre works in a factory.
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A self-described “black, lesbian, mother, warrior, poet,” Audre Lorde (February 18, 1934 – November 17, 1992) dedicated both her life and her creative talent to confronting and addressing injustices of racism, sexism, classism, and homophobia. As described in her 1982 book Zami A New Spelling of My Name. A Biomythography, as a young person she worked operating an x-ray machine cutting quartz crystals in an electronics factory in Stamford, CT, in very dangerous conditions. [Wikipedia entry] [Poetry Foundation]

Text sources: Lorde, Audre (1982) Zami A New Spelling of My Name. A Biomythography. Penguin; CT Department of Public Health COVID19 Dashboard; amFAR, COVID-19 Racial Disparities in U.S. Counties; Wadhera RK, Wadhera P, Gaba P, et al. (April 29, 2020) Variation in COVID-19 Hospitalizations and Deaths Across New York City Boroughs. JAMA. doi:10.1001/jama.2020.7197; Siddique, Haroon (1 May 2020) “British BAME Covid-19 death rate ‘more than twice that of whites'”, the Guardian;  Lorde, Audre, “The Transformation of Silence into Language and Action”, MLA, December 28, 1977.

Source image: photograph of Audre Lorde by Elsa Dorfman (1937–) via Wikimedia Commons. GNU Free Documentation License. This comic strip CC-BY-NC-SA.

References

Lorde, Audre (1982) Zami A New Spelling of My Name. A Biomythography. Penguin. [Internet Archive]

Lorde, Audre, “The Transformation of Silence into Language and Action”, MLA, December 28, 1977. [Internet Archive] First published in Sinister Wisdom 6 (1978) and The Cancer Journals (Spinsters, Ink, San Francisco, 1980).
CT Department of Public Health COVID19 Dashboard. Available at https://maps.ct.gov/portal/apps/opsdashboard/index.html#/48d54b859c8b4a8e87a0376af3513140 [Accessed 9 May 2020]

amFAR, COVID-19 Racial Disparities in U.S. Counties. Available at https://ehe.amfar.org/disparities  [Accessed 9 May 2020]

Wadhera RK, Wadhera P, Gaba P, et al. (April 29, 2020) Variation in COVID-19 Hospitalizations and Deaths Across New York City Boroughs. JAMA. doi:10.1001/jama.2020.7197 [Accessed 9 May 2020]

Siddique, Haroon (1 May 2020) “British BAME Covid-19 death rate ‘more than twice that of whites'”, the Guardian. Available at https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/may/01/british-bame-covid-19-death-rate-more-than-twice-that-of-whites [Accessed 9 May 2020]

Sanchez, Melissa (24 March 2020). ““Essential” Factory Workers Are Afraid to Go to Work and Can’t Afford to Stay Home”. ProPublica CT. Available at https://www.propublica.org/article/coronavirus-essential-factory-workers-illinois [Accessed 9 May 2020]

The Lockdown Chronicles is a series of periodical comic strips made at night (in candlelight!) adapting and reusing openly-licensed or public domain items from online digital collections. Publication and tweetage are scheduled in advance. Historical sources are adapted and updated for the current pandemic; please refer to each strip’s references on each post for further context.  Catch up with the series at https://epriego.blog/tag/the-lockdown-chronicles/.