PhD studentship-Understanding UK digital comics information and publishing practices: From creation to consumption

The advert for the UK Digital Comics information and publishing practices: from creation to consumption PhD studentship opportunity is now available:

APPLY! [Click here]

Application deadline:  31 May 2019. 

DUE TO POPULAR DEMAND DEADLINE NOW EXTENDED TO 14TH JUNE 2019

[Direct link]

University Supervisors: Dr Ernesto Priego (Lecturer, Centre for Human Computer-Interaction Design) <— that’s me! and Dr Stephann Makri (Senior Lecturer in Human-Computer Interaction)

British Library Supervisors: Ian Cooke (Head of Contemporary British Publications) and Stella Wisdom (Digital curator)

[Direct link]

For more information on this and other opportunities see my previous blog post here or go to the British Library announcement at https://www.bl.uk/news/2019/february/ahrc-cdp-2019.

 

 

Digital Comics AHRC Collaborative PhD Opportunities with the British Library

I am delighted to announce that The British Library (British Library) and City, University of London (City) will be offering a fully-funded PhD studentship (including fees and living allowance) on the research theme of ‘Understanding UK digital comics information and publishing practices: From creation to consumption.’ The supervision team for this particular collaborative PhD will be:

  • City, University of London Supervisors: Dr Ernesto Priego (Lecturer, Centre for Human Computer-Interaction Design) and Dr Stephann Makri (Senior Lecturer in Human-Computer Interaction)
  • British Library Supervisors: Ian Cooke (Head of Contemporary British Publications) and Stella Wisdom (Digital curator)

We are super excited that another collaborative studentship on UK Digital Comics, between the British Library and the University of the Arts London (co-supervised by Dr Ian Hague and Professor Roger Sabin) will soon be advertised too.

This means that two of four fully-funded AHRC British Library Collaborative Doctoral Partnerships will focus on UK digital comics. These are incredible news for UK comics scholarship, and a testament of the growth of the field in recent years.

The projects have been developed for the AHRC Collaborative Doctoral Partnerships scheme. The successful candidates will be able to work with the project supervisors to further develop and refine the agreed focus of the research.

Initial announcement on the British Library website at https://www.bl.uk/news/2019/february/ahrc-cdp-2019

Application deadline and further details coming soon… watch this space!

DHCrowdScribe: Building Scholarly Resources for Wider Public Engagement. A #DHCOxf Archive

DH AHRC logo

Building Scholarly Resources for Wider Public Engagement‘ was a full day workshop that took place at the Radcliffe Observatory Quarter, Oxford University, Oxford, on Friday 13 June 2014.

It was organised by DHCrowdscribe, the online hub for the output of the AHRC-funded Collaborative Skills Project ‘Promoting Interdisciplinary Engagement in the Digital Humanities’.

Speakers were:

  • Matt Vitins and Anna Crowe ( Legal and Ethical Issues in the Digital Humanities)
  • Dr Stuart Dunn (Crowdsourcing)
  • Dr Robert Simpson (Zooniverse)
  • Dr Ernesto Priego and Dr James Baker (Sharing Data from a Researcher’s Perspective)
  • Michael Popham, Dr Ylva Berglund Prytz (Digitising the Humanities and Engaging with the Public)
  • Judith Siefring (Early English Books Online Text Creation Partnership)
  • David Tomkins (Bodleian Digital Library)
  • Dr Robert Mcnamee (Electronic Enlightenment Project)
  • Dr Stewart Brookes (‘Getting Medieval, Getting Palaeography: The DigiPal Database of Anglo-Saxon Manuscripts)
  • Dr Michael Athanson (ArcGIS and Mapping the Humanities)
  • Professor David de Roure (Scholarly Social Machines), and
  • Professor Howard Hotson.

The hashtag for the event was #DHCOxf.

I have uploaded an XLS file to figshare which contains Tweets tagged with #DHCOxf (case not sensitive).

The archive contains 692 Tweets dated 13 June 2014 (the day the event took place). There were definitely more Tweets tagged #DHCOxf, but this was the closest I got to compiling a more or less complete set dated 13 June 2014.

I collected the Tweets contained in the archive using Martin Hawksey’s TAGS 5.1. The file contains two sheets:

Sheet 0. The ‘Cite Me’ sheet, including procedence of the file, citation information, information about its contents, the methods employed and some context.

Sheet 1. The Archive containing 692 Tweets dated 13 June 2014.

Priego, Ernesto (2014): DHCrowdScribe: Building Scholarly Resources for Wider Public Engagement. A #DHCOxf Archive. figshare.
http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.1057904

If you use or refer to this data in any way please cite and link back using the citation information above.

Today: Promoting Interdisciplinary Engagement in the Digital Humanities

DH AHRC logo

I am writing this on the train to Oxford, where today James Baker and I will lead a workshop on sharing data for researchers. We have some slides up on figshare here:

Baker, James; Priego, Ernesto (2014): Sharing Data… A Researcher Perspective. figshare.
http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.1038375

Our session will take place around 11-12 BST but feel free to contribute to the etherpad if you are so inclined (link on slides above).

Our participation is part of the DH Crowdscribe Project‘s Promoting Interdisciplinary Engagement in the Digital Humanities AHRC Collaborative Skills series. The poster is here: http://goo.gl/tHhExE [PDF].

I am very much looking forward to this event. Happy Friday everyone.

Curating the Digital Reading Network Blog

The Max Fleischer Studios in 1935, where Jack Kirby started his career (Evanier 2008)
The Max Fleischer Studios in 1935, where Jack Kirby started his career (Evanier 2008)

This month I will be participating as a “curator” of the Digital Reading Network’s blog by posting some brief articles around the general topic of “digital comics”.

As explained on their ‘About’ page, “The Digital Reading Network brings together academics, practitioners, stakeholders and ordinary readers to explore the impact of digitisation on readers and reading, with a focus on the reading of literary texts.” It is funded by the UK’s AHRC within the Digital Transformations theme.

It is my intention to use this month’s topic to post on different online platforms that will link back to the Digital Reading Network blog, and hence try to expand the “network” part of the project by linking back to this blog and reciprocally to link to the other resources. I will in fact be “reblogging” myself there (or over there?) and as such also attempt to play critically on the notion of “original publication” on line.

Instead of starting directly addressing “digital comics” as such, I have taken a look at the assembly-line like conditions of production of American comic books before computers became the norm.

Graphixia is a collaborative comics blog published weekly on Tuesdays. Today it was my turn at Graphixia so I published a post titled “Comic Books: Art Made in the Assembly Line”.

Joining the Digital Reading Network

Digital Reading Network logo

I am honoured to be listed as a consultant of the Digital Reading Network:

“The Digital Reading Network brings together academics, practitioners, stakeholders and ordinary readers to explore the impact of digitisation on readers and reading, with a focus on the reading of literary texts.  It is funded by the AHRC in response to the Digital Transformations theme, and draws on the work of an earlier AHRC funded development project, Researching Readers Online.”

Read more about the project here.

Many thanks to the steering group for inviting me to participate.

 

Forms of Innovation Deck of Slides

I have done an edit of the deck of slides I showed at the Forms of Innovation workshop at the University of Durham last Saturday 27th April 2013 to share online.

You can download it as a .pptx file, and use it under a CC BY license, from Figshare.

Forms of Innovation: Collaboration, Attribution, Access. Ernesto Priego. figshare.

Retrieved 10:57, Apr 29, 2013 (GMT)

http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.693048

Visualising #digitrans

Screenshot of a fragment of a #digitrans TAGSExplorer visualisation
Screenshot of a fragment of a #digitrans TAGSExplorer visualisation, 20/11/2012 1:07 PM GMT

Yesterday I attended the Digital Transformations Moot organised by the Arts and Humanities Research Council in London. My colleague Sarah Quinnell and I participated in the ‘Yack Space’ with a ten-minute flash presentation on our Networked Researcher project. You can view our slides here.

This morning I used Martin Hawksey‘s TAGSExplorer to create a visualisation of a Google spreadsheet archive of the #digitrans tweets. You can view it here.

By tweaking the visualisation’s URL you can also see the nodes connected by @ mentions and @ replies, here.

And if you want to push your browser to the limit and see web entanglement in full effect, the archive can also visualise RTs (here).

Note that the visualisation is in fact an interactive, searchable arhive. You can click on nodes to find out more and also search by keyword.

The Google spreadsheet archive was created once the event had finished (this morning around 9:00am GMT) and it updates itself every fifteen minutes. Nevertheless since the RL event officially concluded last night we can argue most of the event’s backchannel tweets have been collected. At the time of writing this post the archive had collected 1517 unique tweets:

#digitrans archive summary with top 20 tweeters
 #digitrans archive summary with top 20 tweeters. Screen shot taken 20/11/2012 12:48 PM GMT.

As expected most of the tweets were posted during the day of the event (19 November 2012), with some activity some days before and the day after:

#digitrans tweet volume over time graph
 #digitrans tweet volume over time. Screenshot taken 20/11/2012 12:54  PM GMT.

The top tweeters were divided between the organisers, speakers and attendants:

#digitrans top tweeters percentages pie chart
#digitrans top tweeters percentages. Screenshot taken 12:53 PM GMT.

I have found Martin Hawksey’s tool very useful to collect, archive, visualise and analyse Twitter activity, particularly academic conference backchannels. It offers a way of revealing the intrinsically networked and social (as in, involving human interaction) nature of a Twitter’s stream data.

As a form of data mining and distant reading, visualising archives of Twitter backchannels (and therefore networks) can be a useful way of demonstrating an event’s public impact and of discovering key participants, topics, sentiment and links.

At the AHRC’s Digital Transformations Moot

Networked Researcher logo

AHRC logo

Sarah-Louise Quinnell and I will be presenting Networked Researcher at the AHRC’s Digital Transformations Moot, taking place Monday 19 November 2012 in The Mermaid Centre London. We will be participating in the ‘Yack Space’ talking about Networked Researcher for ten minutes from 12:30PM.