Insights from the Altmetric Top 100 2016

screen-shot-2016-12-13-at-10-33-41
Altmetric Top 100 2016 Affiliations. via Altmetric

The Altmetric Top 100 2016 was published yesterday. If you click on the green ‘read more about this list’ button, you’ll see useful analysis of the data.

[I also wrote about the Altmetric Top 100 2014, here and here.]

It’s very welcome that this year Altmetric has deposited the article and affiliation data as two datasets as a collection on figshare:

Engineering, Altmetric (2016): Altmetric Top 100 2016. figshare. https://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.c.3590951.v2 Retrieved: 11 24, Dec 14, 2016 (GMT)

This time the source data provides greater insights, particularly the article’s access type  (Open Access, ‘Free’ or paywalled), type of content (article, letter, etc.) and subject.

Altmetric has already provided an analysis of this data (percentage of OA outputs in the list; countries of affiliations, institutions etc.) but having access to the source data means their analysis, visualisations and findings are actually reproducible (reproducibility was identified as a topic gaining interest; see Cat Williams’ post here). By providing access to the source data openly, other types of analysis are not only possible but encouraged (for example text and content analysis of the top 100 output titles).

One insight for me is that this list again demonstrates the dominance of the usual countries of affiliation, and up to a certain extent of the same journals (considering that Altmetric tracks a selection of publications, not all publications that exist).

I was interested in finding out whether the Top 100 would include any articles authored or coauthored by researchers with a Mexican institution as affiliation. There are two:

  1. A genome-wide association scan in admixed Latin Americans identifies loci influencing facial and scalp hair features. Nature Communications 7, Article number: 10815 (2016) doi:10.1038/ncomms10815 (Published online:01 March 2016)
  2. Beverage purchases from stores in Mexico under the excise tax on sugar sweetened beverages: observational study. BMJ 2016;352:h6704 doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.h6704 (Published 06 January 2016)

It is notable that both articles are the result of international coauthorship; the Nature Communications article including authors from other Latin American countries (Argenitna, Chile, Colombia); the BMJ one from Mexico and the United States. Importantly, both articles are open access.

I was also interested in seeing whether any Information Science or Computer Science research had made it into the list. There is only one article whose subject was categorised as “Information and Computer Sciences”:

Mastering the game of Go with deep neural networks and tree search. Nature 529,484–489 (28 January 2016) doi:10.1038/nature16961

This is a paywalled article authored by a team of 21 authors with Google DeepMind (London, UK) as affiliation.

I believe access to this data is useful to understand the evolving landscape of scholarly communications. It can also help us authors to gain insights into what kind of research is receiving attention online.

For example, the data seems to contribute to a body of encdotal and bibliometric evidence indicating that, for researchers with affiliations in ‘developing’ nations,  open access and international collaboration remains key to greater visibility.

This year’s data also shows, again, that some countries (in the case of Africa, a whole continent), fields, and journals, remain under-represented or not present at all. It should also be noted that the only Computer Science article in the list is not by researchers affiliated to universities but to Google.

Yesterday I tweeted some quick thoughts after checking out the datasets, and compiled them using the new-ish ‘Moments’ feature on Twitter, which, for what it’s worth, I have embedded below.

[I also wrote about the Altmetric Top 100 2014, here and here.]

References

Engineering, Altmetric (2016): Altmetric Top 100 2016. figshare. https://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.c.3590951.v2 Retrieved: 11 24, Dec 14, 2016 (GMT)

HEFCE Metrics: A one-day workshop hosted by the University of Warwick

University of Warwick Faculty of Arts banner

Metrics and the assessment of research quality and impact in the Arts and Humanities

A one-day workshop hosted by the University of Warwick, as part of the Independent Review of the Role of Metrics in Research Assessment.

Date: Friday 16th January 2015 (10:30 to 16:30)

Location: Scarman Conference Centre, University of Warwick

The workshop will have the following objectives:

1. Offering a clear overview of the progress to date in the development of metrics of relevance to arts and humanities to date and persisting challenges.

2. Exploring the potential benefits and drawbacks of metrics use in research assessment and management from the perspective of disciplines within the arts and humanities.

3. Generating evidence, insights and concrete recommendations that can inform the final report of the independent metrics review.

The workshop will be attended by several members of the metrics review steering group, academics and stakeholders drawn from across the wider HE and research community.

Confirmed speakers include:

  • Prof. Jonathan Adams, King’s College London
  • Prof. Geoffrey Crossick, AHRC Cultural Value Project and Crafts Council
  • Prof. Maria Delgado, Queen Mary, University of London
  • Dr Clare Donovan, Brunel University
  • Dr Martin Eve, University of Lincoln and Open Library of Humanities
  • Prof. Mark Llewellyn, Director of Research, AHRC
  • Dr Alis Oancea, University of Oxford
  • Dr Ernesto Priego, City University London
  • Prof. Mike Thelwall, University of Wolverhampton (member of the HEFCE review steering group)
  • Prof. Evelyn Welch, King’s College London

Please register here.

Comparing Altmetric Scores of 2014 Top 25 Paywalled and Top 25 Open Access Outputs

[For context, please see this and this].

If you are new to altmetrics please read:

omparison of scores top 25 by access type

Top 25 Paywalled Outputs in 2014 Altmetric Top 100 List

Altmetric Score in timeframe Title Journal URL
4822.008 Variation in Melanism and Female Preference in Proximate but Ecologically Distinct Environments Ethology http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/eth.12282
3499.068 Artificial sweeteners induce glucose intolerance by altering the gut microbiota Nature http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature13793
2985.992 Stimulus-triggered fate conversion of somatic cells into pluripotency Nature http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature12968
2065.172 Genomic surveillance elucidates Ebola virus origin and transmission during the 2014 outbreak Science http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1259657
1868.194 High-resolution global maps of 21st-century forest cover change Science http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1244693
1837.974 Association of nut consumption with total and cause-specific mortality New England Journal of Medicine http://dx.doi.org/10.1056/nejmoa1307352
1767.556 Female Penis, Male Vagina, and Their Correlated Evolution in a Cave Insect Current Biology http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2014.03.022
1691.35 Does Nursing Assistant Certification Increase Nursing Student’s Confidence Level of Basic Nursing Care When Entering a Nursing Program? Journal of Professional Nursing http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.profnurs.2013.09.002
1596.304 Observation of Dirac monopoles in a synthetic magnetic field Nature http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature12954
1570.614 Bidirectional developmental potential in reprogrammed cells with acquired pluripotency Nature http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature12969
1450.328 Post-study caffeine administration enhances memory consolidation in humans Nature Neuroscience http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nn.3623
1426.218 A semi-synthetic organism with an expanded genetic alphabet Nature http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature13314
1403 The Pen Is Mightier Than the Keyboard: Advantages of Longhand Over Laptop Note Taking Psychological Science http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0956797614524581
1379.79 Sleep Deprivation and False Memories Psychological Science http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0956797614534694
1343.46 Global sodium consumption and death from cardiovascular causes New England Journal of Medicine http://dx.doi.org/10.1056/nejmoa1304127
1333.33 Nurse staffing and education and hospital mortality in nine European countries: a retrospective observational study The Lancet http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0140-6736(13)62631-8
1280.024 An estimation of the number of cells in the human body Annals of Tropical Medicine & Parasitology http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/03014460.2013.807878
1242.21 Young blood reverses age-related impairments in cognitive function and synaptic plasticity in mice Nature Medicine http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nm.3569
1208.974 An Earth-Sized Planet in the Habitable Zone of a Cool Star Science http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1249403
1180.632 Effects of Low-Carbohydrate and Low-Fat Diets: A Randomized Trial Annals of Internal Medicine http://dx.doi.org/10.7326/m14-0180
1140.892 Emergence of Zaire Ebola Virus Disease in Guinea – Preliminary Report New England Journal of Medicine http://dx.doi.org/10.1056/nejmoa1404505
1076.698 Social psychology. Just think: the challenges of the disengaged mind. Science http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1250830
1026.624 Vaccines are not associated with autism: An evidence-based meta-analysis of case-control and cohort studies Vaccine http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2014.04.085
1017.118 Ebola Virus Disease in West Africa – The First 9 Months of the Epidemic and Forward Projections New England Journal of Medicine http://dx.doi.org/10.1056/nejmoa1411100
1017.05 The complete genome sequence of a Neanderthal from the Altai Mountains Nature http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature12886

Top 25 Open Access Outputs in 2014 Altmetric Top 100 List

Score in timeframe Title Journal URL
5043.756 Experimental evidence of massive-scale emotional contagion through social networks Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1320040111
2955.068 Dogs are sensitive to small variations of the Earth’s magnetic field Frontiers in Zoology http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1742-9994-10-80
2733.264 Christmas 2013: Research: The survival time of chocolates on hospital wards: covert observational study British Medical Journal http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.f7198
2391.834 Epidemiological modeling of online social network dynamics arXiv http://fr.arxiv.org/abs/1401.4208
2245.134 Searching the Internet for evidence of time travelers arXiv http://arxiv.org/abs/1312.7128
2159.53 Conscious Brain-to-Brain Communication in Humans Using Non-Invasive Technologies PLOS ONE http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0105225
2145.898 Were James Bond’s drinks shaken because of alcohol induced tremor? British Medical Journal http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.f7255
1693.21 Sliding Rocks on Racetrack Playa, Death Valley National Park: First Observation of Rocks in Motion PLOS ONE http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0105948
1692.7 Information Preservation and Weather Forecasting for Black Holes arXiv http://arxiv.org/abs/1401.57
1478.518 Bodily maps of emotions Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1321664111
1422.932 Milk intake and risk of mortality and fractures in women and men: cohort studies British Medical Journal http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.g6015
1248.87 Female hurricanes are deadlier than male hurricanes Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1402786111
1137.826 The hipster effect: When anticonformists all look the same arXiv http://arxiv.org/abs/1410.8001
1119.952 A Gigantic, Exceptionally Complete Titanosaurian Sauropod Dinosaur from Southern Patagonia, Argentina Scientific Reports http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep06196
1073.29 Skeletal Muscle PGC-1α1 Modulates Kynurenine Metabolism and Mediates Resilience to Stress-Induced Depression Cell http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cell.2014.07.051
1067.73 Survey of Academic Field Experiences (SAFE): Trainees Report Harassment and Assault PLOS ONE http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0102172
1059.886 Volatile disinfection byproducts resulting from chlorination of uric acid: Implications for swimming pools Environmental Science & Technology http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/es405402r
956.824 How to make more published research true PLOS Medicine http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.1001747
934.958 Low Protein Intake Is Associated with a Major Reduction in IGF-1, Cancer, and Overall Mortality in the 65 and Younger but Not Older Population Cell Metabolism http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cmet.2014.02.006
898.424 Dendrogramma, New Genus, with Two New Non-Bilaterian Species from the Marine Bathyal of Southeastern Australia (Animalia, Metazoa incertae sedis) with Similarities to Some Medusoids from the Precambrian Ediacara PLOS ONE http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0102976
880.038 Sex differences in the structural connectome of the human brain Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1316909110
873.144 Identifiable Images of Bystanders Extracted from Corneal Reflections PLOS ONE http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0083325
869.706 Nutrition and Health – The Association between Eating Behavior and Various Health Parameters: A Matched Sample Study PLOS ONE http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0088278
842.594 No Evidence of Dehydration with Moderate Daily Coffee Intake: A Counterbalanced Cross-Over Study in a Free-Living Population PLOS ONE http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0084154
830.81 Oxytocin enhances brain reward system responses in men viewing the face of their female partner Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1314190110


Priego, Ernesto (2014): A List of the 37 Open Access Outputs Most-mentioned Onine in 2014 According to Altmetric. figshare.

http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.1266304

More on the Altmetric 2014 Top 100

Yesterday I published a post with some initial readings of the Altmetric 2014 Top 100 articles (I’ll be calling them “outputs” as some are not versions of record).

[If you are new to altmetrics please read:

I am interested in being able to investigate whether any trends in publication access preference can be detected, or at least in registering the evidence in order to be able to compare with new data next year for example.

I looked at the countries of affiliation of the authors of the papers  (some papers in the list had only authors from the same country, while others had various authors from different countries). There are 39 unique countries of affiliation in the list:

Country
Argentina
Australia
Austria
Belgium
Brazil
Canada
Chile
China
Czech Republic
Denmark
Ecuador
Finland
France
Germany
Greece
Guinea
Indonesia
Ireland
Israel
Italy
Japan
Kenya
Mexico
Morocco
Nigeria
Norway
Poland
Puerto Rico
Republic of Congo
Romania
Russia
Sierra Leone
Singapore
Spain
Sweden
Switzerland
The Netherlands
UK
USA

Some outputs in the list had affiliations from only one country. The countries with one-country affiliation outputs in the list are:

Country
Australia
Austria
Canada
China
Czech Republic
Denmark
Finland
France
Germany
Israel
Italy
Sweden
The Netherlands
UK
USA

Apart from a few dominant countries of affiliation in the majority of the outputs in the list (the USA, Canada, France, Germany, the UK) most other countries do have a relatively minimal number of contributions. As Cat Chimes pointed out in her blog post, “68 of the Top 100 had authors from the United States, 19 had authors from the UK, 10 from Canada, 11 from Germany (the most in Europe), 4 from China, and 9 from South or Central America” [I counted 20 outputs with authors with UK affiliations, but I may have made a mistake– I shall check…].

I like alluvial diagrams because even though they require context (for example for knowing the exact numbers behind the volumes/height/density of nodes) they do provide a quick visual insight into the links between different columns/labels in a dataset.

An alluvial diagram of the whole list by access type proved visually chaotic and confusing. Therefore I made some diagrams by grouping them in regions (I did not use the original region categorisation provided by Altmetric). These are the regions I wanted to look at first, not all the regions/countries included in the list.

I started by comparing number of affiliations from the UK and the USA by the access types of the outputs they contributed to:

Author affiliations in the USA and the UK in the Altmetric 2014 Top 100 list
Author affiliations in the USA and the UK in the Altmetric 2014 Top 100 list

Please note that as indicated above some of the outputs visualised in this diagram were jointly written by authors from the UK, the USA and other countries. What the diagram in this case compares is the access types of outputs with authors from either country, so a section of each access type will always overlap, which means this diagram shows the presence of either country of affiliation, but they are not mutually exclusive.

Following this case of the UK and the USA, a comparison can be made with a diagram showing outputs with authors from one single country of affiliation, which might prove more interesting:

Outputs with authors with affiliations from only one country  (USA or UK) by access type in the 2014 Altmetric Top 100 List. Outputs with authors with affiliations from only one country  (USA or UK) by access type in the 2014 Altmetric Top 100 List.
Outputs with authors with affiliations from only one country (USA or UK) by access type in the 2014 Altmetric Top 100 List. Outputs with authors with affiliations from only one country (USA or UK) by access type in the 2014 Altmetric Top 100 List.

Or, for further clarity, as a bar chart:

Outputs by Authors of Only One Country of Affiliation by Access Type in the Altmetric 2014 Top 100 USA and UK
Outputs by Authors of Only One Country of Affiliation by Access Type in the Altmetric 2014 Top 100 USA and UK

It is interesting that the only outputs in the 2014 Altmetric Top 100 list by authors affiliated to UK institutions (and no other countries) were open access and not paywalled. (Once again this might be explained by Altmetric’s sources).

With the intention of offering some context, the following diagram shows all the outputs by authors from a single country of affiliation in the 2014 Altmetric Top 100 list by access type:

Outputs in the Altmetric 2014 Top 100 List by Authors of Only One Country of Affiliation by Access Type
Outputs in the Altmetric 2014 Top 100 List by Authors of Only One Country of Affiliation by Access Type

I points I found interesting from making and looking at the charts:

  • A clear split (almost 50/50) of paywalled and open access outputs by authors of various international affiliations including authors  from UK and USA institutions
  • 37 of the 100 outputs in the list had authors from the USA only (no other country affiliations). The 37 USA-only outputs were divided in 23 paywalled (62%) and 14 open access (38%). This in stark contrast with the 5 UK-only outputs, which were all open access.
  • As in the case of UK-only outputs, when countries had more than one single-country output they did not always split into two access types. If the UK-only outputs were all open access, All the Netherlands, Italy, Israel, Australia and Czech Republic single-affiliation outputs were paywalled.
  • Germany, which had the highest number of outputs from Europe in the list (11), had 9 outputs in collaboration with various countries, all paywalled. The other two outputs were single-affiliation (Germany-only), both open access.

I have made a series of other diagrams but I will share them in a forthcoming post.

N.B.

As always, please take into account that these are not just 100 outputs mentioned online, but those with the most impressive number of “mentions” (links to permanent identifiers) in the online sources tracked by Altmetric. There is no suggestion that the online popularity of these outputs reflects uncontroversially their “quality”. The fact is that they’ve been mentioned (linked to) on line, and in the current landscape of scholarly communication, I find this fact not without its significance.

The sample of 100 outputs might be considered small, and the bias implicit in Altmetric’s sources and tracking mechanisms impose a series of important caveats to offering any robust conclusions at the moment. However, there is already some data we will be able to compare with future data in the short and long term.

Priego, Ernesto (2014): A List of the 37 Open Access Outputs Most-mentioned Onine in 2014 According to Altmetric. figshare.

http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.1266304

Reading the Altmetric 2014 Top 100 Articles from a Distance

The London-based article-level metrics provider Altmetric published a list of their top 100 highest-scoring articles yesterday (access the full Top 100 list). For essential context, please read the accompanying blog post by Cat Chimes here, as well as her “Unwanted attention?” November 14 2014 post here. This recent post on how Altmetric tracks global news will also be relevant to understand the context of the list.

If you are new to altmetrics please read

I am interested in how bibliographic datasets can be subject to ‘distant reading’: can we learn something from looking at what words are used in the titles of articles being mentioned online by larger audiences? Are there any correlations between wording in title,  topic, methodology, discipline, or region and an output’s access type?

I won’t even attempt to answer these questions on a blog post… but in the meanwhile I wanted to share with you a cloud visualisation of the 100 article titles I made with Voyant Tools:

The Altmetric 2014 Top 100 journal article titles as a Cirrus word cloud using Voyant Tools and applying TaporWare English stop words.
The Altmetric 2014 Top 100 journal article titles as a Cirrus word cloud using Voyant Tools and applying TaporWare English stop words.

With Voyant we can also find out which are the 50 most-frequent words in the 100 journal article titles and their counts:

mortality 6
           study 6
         disease 5
           risk 5
         adults 4
           cells 4
    consumption 4
           ebola 4
       evidence 4
         female 4
         global 4
           human 4
         intake 4
         nursing 4
         states 4
         united 4
           virus 4
         alcohol 3
    associated 3
         decline 3
           field 3
    functional 3
         genomic 3
         health 3
         humans 3
           just 3
             men 3
observational 3
         origin 3
    population 3
       reduction 3
         social 3
           west 3
           young 3
       academic 2
         african 2
       alzheimer 2
    association 2
         autism 2
       behavior 2
           brain 2
cardiovascular 2
         causes 2
           cave 2
           cell 2
         change 2
    chelyabinsk 2
       childhood 2
       cognitive 2
         cohort 2

Altmetric’s list usefully labeled the articles in their list by access type (open/paywalled): 37 of the articles in the top 100 were published as open access (63 were originally published under the paywall/subscription model). Again using Voyant, this is the word cloud of the 37 open access articles in the list:

 

The Altmetric 2014 Top Open Access journal article titles in their Top 100 list as a Cirrus word cloud using Voyant Tools and applying TaporWare English stop words.
The Altmetric 2014 Top Open Access journal article titles in their Top 100 list as a Cirrus word cloud using Voyant Tools and applying TaporWare English stop words.

And the list of the top 50 most-frequent words of the 37 OA journal articles in the list:

       evidence 3
           intake 3
           study 3
         african 2
         alcohol 2
           brain 2
         decline 2
           female 2
           field 2
           health 2
           human 2
       hurricanes 2
    intermediate 2
           men 2
       mortality 2
           new 2
       population 2
       reduction 2
         research 2
             risk 2
           rocks 2
           social 2
             time 2
           young 2
         academic 1
             acid 1
         actions 1
           age 1
       alzheimer 1
         american 1
         angular 1
         animalia 1
anticonformists 1
       argentina 1
         assault 1
       assessing 1
       associated 1
    association 1
       australia 1
           autism 1
           bad 1
         bathyal 1
         behavior 1
           black 1
           bodily 1
           bond’s 1
             boys 1
brain-to-brain 1
         burdens 1
       byproducts 1

By having the data as a .csv file it was easier for me to find out quickly that the open access articles in the Top 100 list were published in the following 14 journals and repositories (from highest to lowest score):

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Frontiers in Zoology
British Medical Journal
arXiv
PLOS ONE
Scientific Reports
Cell
Environmental Science & Technology
PLOS Medicine
Cell Metabolism
Neurology
Translational Neurodegeneration
Journal of Neuroscience
SSRN

I have deposited on figshare a spreadsheet with the list of the 37 open access articles, including journal/repository names, URLs, published dates and region of authors affiliations.

Priego, Ernesto (2014): A List of the 37 Open Access Outputs Most-mentioned Onine in 2014 According to Altmetric. figshare.

http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.1266304

Retrieved 14:48, Dec 10, 2014 (GMT)

For what it’s worth these were the open access outputs that were most-mentioned online according to Altmetric in 2014. Let’s see what happens next year.

As part of my ongoing research I also made this alluvial diagram visualising access type by number of outputs per category, which exemplifies quite directly in my opinion, at least from this specific distance, the dominance of certain disciplines in terms of article-level metrics, but also certain’s disciplines preference within this particular corpus for particular access models.

Alluvial Diagram showing access type by category from the  2014 Altmetric Top 100 Articles; height of node indicates number of outputs by category in the list.  Source data: Altmetric http://www.altmetric.com/top100/2014 Chart CC-BY @ernestopriego
Alluvial Diagram showing access type by category from the 2014 Altmetric Top 100 Articles; height of node indicates number of outputs by category in the list. Source data: Altmetric http://www.altmetric.com/top100/2014

 

A #HEFCEmetrics Twitter Archive

#hefcemetrics top tweeters

I have uploaded a new dataset to figshare:
Priego, Ernesto (2014): A #HEFCEmetrics Twitter Archive. figshare.
http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.1196029

“In metrics we trust? Prospects & pitfalls of new research metrics” was a one-day workshop hosted by the University of Sussex, as part of the Independent Review of the Role of Metrics in Research Assessment. It took place on Tuesday 7 October 2014 at the Terrace Room, Conference Centre, Bramber House, University of Sussex, UK.

The file contains a dataset of 1178 Tweets tagged with #HEFCEmetrics (case not sensitive). These Tweets were published publicly and tagged with #HEFCEmetrics between 02/10/2014 10:18 and 08/10/2014 00:27 GMT.

The Tweets contained in the file were collected using Martin Hawksey’s TAGS 6.0. The file contains 3 sheets.

Please note the data in this file is likely to require further refining and even deduplication. The data is shared as is. The contents of each Tweet are responsibility of the original authors. This dataset is shared to encourage open research into scholarly activity on Twitter.

For more information refer to the upload itself.

If you use or refer to this data in any way please cite and link back using the citation information above.

1:AM London Altmetrics Conference: A #1AMconf Twitter Archive

1:AM  London 2014 logo

I have uploaded a new dataset to figshare:

Priego, Ernesto (2014): 1:AM London Altmetrics Conference: A #1AMconf Twitter Archive .  figshare.
http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.1185443

1:AM London, “the 1st Altmetrics Conference: London”, took place 25th—26th September 2014 at the Wellcome Collection, London, UK.

The  file contains a dataset of 4267 Tweets tagged with #1AMconf (case not sensitive). These Tweets were published publicly and tagged with #1AMconf  between Thursday September 18 17:29:56 +0000 2014 and Sunday September 28 16:07:49 +0000 2014.

Only users with at least 2 followers were included in the archive. Retweets have been included. An initial automatic deduplication was performed but data might require further deduplication. The Time column (D) has times in British Summer Time (BST).

Please go to the file cited above for more information.

 

An #altmetrics14 Twitter Archive

"Altmetrics14: expanding impacts and metrics" (#altmetrics 14) was an ACM Web Science Conference 2014 Workshop that took place on June 23, 2014 in Bloomington, Indiana, United States, between 10:00AM and 17:50 local time.

Altmetrics14: expanding impacts and metrics” (#altmetrics 14) was an ACM Web Science Conference 2014 Workshop that took place on June 23, 2014 in Bloomington, Indiana, United States, between 10:00AM and 17:50 local time.

I have uploaded to figshare a dataset of 1758 Tweets tagged with #altmetrics14 (case not sensitive).

The dataset contains an archive of 1758 Tweets published publicly and tagged with #altmetrics14 between Mon Jun 02 17:41:56 +0000 2014 and Wed Jul 16 00:48:38 +0000 2014.

During the day of the workshop, 1294 Tweets tagged with #altmetrics14 were collected.

If you use or refer to the shared file in any way please cite and link back using the following citation information:

Priego, Ernesto (2014): An #altmetrics14 Twitter Archive.  figshare.

http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.1151577 

I have shared the file with a Creative Commons- Attribution license (CC-BY) for academic research and educational use.

The Tweets contained in the file were collected using Martin Hawksey’s TAGS 5.1.  The file contains 3 sheets.

The third sheet in the file contains 1294 Tweets tagged with #altmetrics14 collected during the day of the workshop.

The usual fair warnings apply:

Only users with at least 2 followers were included in the archive. Retweets have been included. An initial automatic deduplication was performed but data might require further deduplication.

Please note that both research and experience show that the Twitter search API isn’t 100% reliable. Large Tweet volumes affect the search collection process. The API might “over-represent the more central users”, not offering “an accurate picture of peripheral activity” (González-Bailón, Sandra, et al. 2012). It is therefore not guaranteed this file contains each and every Tweet tagged with #altmetrics14 during the indicated period, and is shared for comparative and indicative educational and research purposes only.

Please note the data in this file is likely to require further refining and even deduplication. The data is shared as is.  This dataset is shared to encourage open research into scholarly activity on Twitter. If you use or refer to this data in any way please cite and link back using the citation information above.