A #IGNCC14 Twitter Archive (Conference Days Only)

The Fifth International Comics and Graphic Novels Conference took place in London 18- 20 July 2014. The official hashtag was #IGNCC14.

I have uploaded to figshare an .XLS file containing a dataset of Tweets tagged with #IGNCC14 (case not sensitive).

Priego, Ernesto (2014): A #IGNCC4 Twitter Archive (Conference Days Only).   figshare.

http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.1112639

The complete archive contains  1294  Tweets published publicly and tagged with #IGNCC14 between 18/07/2014  07:25:47 BST and 21/07/2014  10:17:15 BST.

The conference’s Twitter activity at a glance:

 

#igncc14 TAGS Archive dashboard
#igncc14 TAGS Archive dashboard
#igncc14 Tweet Volume Over Time
#igncc14 Tweet Volume Over Time

The Tweets contained in the archive were collected using Martin Hawksey’s TAGS 5.1.  The file contains five sheets:

  • Sheet 0. A ‘Cite Me’ sheet, including procedence of this file, citation information,  information about its contents, the methods employed and some context.
  • Sheet 1.  Complete #IGNCC14 Archive (Conference days only). 1294 Tweets, from 18/07/2014  07:25:47 BST to 21/07/2014  10:17:15 BST.
  • Sheet 2.  Friday 18 July 2014. 469 Tweets, from 18/07/2014  07:25:47 BST  to 18/07/2014  21:27:23 BST.
  • Sheet 3. Saturday 19 July 2014. 390 Tweets, from 19/07/2014  06:54:24 BST to 19/07/2014  18:01:05 BST.
  • Sheet 4. Sunday 20 July 2014. 433 Tweets, from 20/07/2014  01:41:11 BST to 21/07/2014  10:17:15 BST.

Tweets collected under Local London, UK times. Times in GMT also included.

Only users with at least 2 followers were included in the archive. Retweets have been included. An initial automatic deduplication was performed. I manually organised and quantified the Tweets in the archive into conference days.

Please note that both research and experience show that the Twitter search API isn’t 100% reliable. Large tweet volumes affect the search collection process. The API might “over-represent the more central users”, not offering “an accurate picture of peripheral activity” (González-Bailón, Sandra, et al. 2012). It is not guaranteed thE file contains each and every Tweet tagged with #IGNCC14 during the indicated period, and is shared for comparative and indicative educational and research purposes only.

Please note the data in this file is likely to require further refining and even deduplication. The data is shared as is.  This dataset is shared to encourage open research into scholarly activity on Twitter. If you use or refer to this data in any way please cite and link back using the citation information above.

A #HASTAC2014 Conference Tweets Archive

HASTAC 2014, Lima, Perú

Like last year, I attempted to archive the tweets tagged with the HASTAC annual conference’s official hashtag (this year #HASTAC2014).

The resulting dataset is a CSV file containing 3748 tweets tagged with #HASTAC2014 (case not sensitive).

The first tweet in the dataset is dated 19/04/2014 23:10:50 Lima, Perú time and the last one is dated 27/04/2014 15:00:54 also Lima, Perú time. The file also contains equivalent times in GMT.

HASTAC is an alliance of humanists, artists, social scientists, scientists and technologists working together to transform the future of learning for the 21st century. Since 2002, HASTAC (“haystack”) has served as a community of connection where 11,500+ members share news, tools, research, insights, and projects to promote engaged learning for a global society.

HASTAC 2014: Hemispheric Pathways: Critical Makers in International Networks, the 6th international conference for the Humanities, Arts, Science, and Technology Alliance and Collaboratory,  was hosted by the Ministerio Cultura of Lima, Perú, from 6pm Wednesday 23 April to 1pm Sunday 27 April 2014 local time. In order to avoid the inclusion of spam tweets the minimum number of followers a person had to have to be included in the archive was two.

I harvested the tweets with (several!) Twitter Archiving Google Spreadsheets (TAGS version 5.1, by Martin Hawksey).

Please note that both research and experience show that the Twitter search API isn’t 100% reliable. Large tweet volumes affect the search collection process as well. The API might “over-represent the more central users”, not offering “an accurate picture of peripheral activity” (González-Bailón, Sandra, et al. 2012). Therefore, it cannot be guaranteed this file contains each and every tweet tagged with #HASTAC2014 during the indicated period.

[It should go without saying but perhaps it must also be noted that some conference tweets might have used other variations of the hashtag. Logically those were not included in this collection. Therefore it cannot be said that even all tweets tagged #HASTAC2014 represent all the Twitter activity around the 2014 conference.]

The file includes raw data and it might require refining including deduplication. The data is shared as is.

The file is openly accessible via figshare:

Priego, Ernesto (2014): #HASTAC2014 Conference Tweets Archive from 19 April to 25 April 2014. figshare.
http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.1008290

[I have just published this and the doi might take some time to become active].

The URL for the dataset is

http://figshare.com/articles/_HASTAC2014_Conference_Tweets_Archive_from_19_April_to_25_April_2014/1008290

The file is shared with a Creative Commons- Attribution license (CC-BY).

I have been archiving conference tweets and sharing backchannel datasets for some time now. I am keen on promoting the study of academic conference networks on Twitter. By openly sharing the resulting datasets and by blogging about it throughout time, I have also been openly documenting my own learning curve trying to archive tweets and how to do it better.  If you use or refer to this data in any way please cite and link back using the citation information above.

I will hopefully have time to finish and publish another post with more detail about the HASTAC conference backchannels soon.

Thank you for reading and sharing. If you attended the conference, I hope you had a nice time. As usual, I am sorry I could not attend in person.

 

Public Knowledge Project Conference Tweets Archive #pkpconf

The Fourth International Public Knowledge Project Scholarly Publishing Conference was held August 19 – 21, 2013 in Mexico City, Mexico.

I have shared an archive of the tweets tagged with #pkpconf on figshare. I started the archive on Augutst 14 2013 at 15:02:58 GMT and the I closed the last tweet in the archive is from  01 September 2013 at 20:16:39 GMT.

The archive contains 841 tweets. Towards the end of the conference, the backchannel activity peaked at more than 450 tweets.

#pkpconf tweet volume over time
#pkpconf tweet volume over time

 

We found that our colleague Isabel Galina (@igalina) made the top of the list, closely followed by PKP’s Juan Pablo Alperin (@juancommander).

 

#pkpconf Top Tweeters
#pkpconf Top Tweeters

The tweets per person average was of 5.44, with a tweets per person median of 2.

Here’s hoping the archive is of some use to someone else.

#pkpconf Archive . Ernesto Priego. figshare.
http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.785782

Retrieved 15:23, Sep 02, 2013 (GMT)

 

 

 

 

Veánlo crecer: un archivo interactivo de #DiaHD

Reblogged entry from/entrada reblogueada de mi blog del Día de las Humanidades Digitales 2013.

Captura de pantalla del archivo interactivo de #DiaHD tomada en 2013-05-16 at 16.17.14 BST
Captura de pantalla del archivo interactivo de #DiaHD tomada en 2013-05-16 at 16.17.14 BST

Desde ayer en cuanto supe cuál sería el hashtag para este evento hice un archivo interactivo de los tweets etiquetados con #DiaHD. Al parecer el archivo incluye desde el primer tweet que se envió. El archivo se actualiza cada hora.

Además de contar con una base de datos de todos los tuits etiquetados con #DiaHD, una de las intenciones al establecer este archivo y compartirlo públicamente desde el principio es ir viendo cómo va creciendo conforme se acerca el 10 de junio y cómo van cambiando l@s usuari@s y las interacciones entre ello@s.

Como ya es costumbre en mi trabajo hice uso del TAGS Explorer de Martin Hawksey.

#HASTAC2013 Interactive Archive

http://hastac2013.org/
http://hastac2013.org/

Version 2.0 The figshare and HASTAC versions of this post have been updated accordingly.

UPDATE Thursday 2 May 2013, 08:48am BST. 

Unfortunately I did not have time to do a new collection increasing the number of tweets to collect. The initial collection used the default 1500, and even though I did it on the Monday morning (BST time) after the conference the archive did not go back enough (it can only go back 7 days). In retrospect I should have aimed to collect more tweets than the default 1500 the first time around, but I was concerned the script would time out.

I only found some time this morning to try again (script having timed out when I tried 18,000 tweets, which is the maximum output), and using 17,500 at worked this time, taking me as back as 26/04/13, 08:2243, which is more than 24 hours before my previous collection.The Conference information says activities started on 25/04/13 (Thursday) but as the programme and now both #hastac2013 archives confirm the day with the most activity was 27/04/13 (Saturday). Therefore though this new collection does not go as back as the 25th, at least it covers the day before activity peaked. Where the previous archive had 1500 tweets, this new one gathered 3,898.

Here two screeshots of the second archive’s summary charts right after I ran the collection:

3898 tweets collected, archive started 26/04/13 8:22:43. Archive set up by Ernesto Priego using TAGS.
3898 tweets collected, archive started 26/04/13 8:22:43. Archive set up by Ernesto Priego using TAGS.
#HASTAC2013 Tweet Volume Over Time, second collection, with peak on 28/04/13, reaching ∼1200 tweets. Archive set up by Ernesto Priego
#HASTAC2013 Tweet Volume Over Time, second collection, with peak on 28/04/13, reaching ∼1200 tweets. Archive set up by Ernesto Priego

You can see a published interactive archive of this new archive here.

I link to the published spreadsheets from the PDF version of this post that can be downloaded from figshare.

HASTAC2013 Interactive Archive. Ernesto Priego. figshare.
http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.693045

[Version 1.0 below]

As they describe it themselves, the Humanities, Arts, Science, Technology Advanced Collaboratory (HASTAC – “haystack” hastac.org), is “an organisation at the international forefront of knowledge mobilization for our digital present and innovation in the academy.” I have had the honour to be a HASTAC Scholar blogging at their site since 2010.

2013 marks the 10th anniversary of HASTAC’s founding, and on 25th-28th April they celebrated their decennial conference, titled “The Storm of Progress: New Horizons, New Narratives, New Codes”, in Toronto, Canada.

I was able to participate in the conference via pre-recorded video thanks to Fiona Barnett’s kind invitation on Saturday the 27th. While I as presenting in real life at the Forms of Innovation workshop at Durham, UK, my video was being shown in Toronto! This also means that while colleagues were live-tweeting about my session at #formsinn, they were also live-tweeting from #hastac2013…

Anyway many of us were able to follow the proceedings of the HASTAC conference through a lively Twitter backchannel. I believe the backchannel is a useful research resource on its own, and of course it allows us to perform some ‘meta’ analysis of the network itself. I set up a Google spreadsheet to collect #HASTAC2013 tweets and created an interactive archive that visualises the interactions in real time. (This will make demands from your browser…)

[I have done an intial archive covering only the latest (at the time of publishing) 1500 tweets, as high values may no work due to script timeouts, but I am currently experimenting trying to get the majority of the #hastac2013 output. Will update accordingly. Times from my archiving are GMT].

Screen Shot of a moment in #HASTAC2013 interactive archive, 2013-04-29 at 09.03.13     Screen Shot of a moment in #HASTAC2013 interactive archive, 2013-04-29 at 09.03.13
Screen Shot of a moment in #HASTAC2013 interactive archive, 2013-04-29 at 09.03.13
1500 tweets, 599 RTs, 421 links. Archive started by Ernesto Priego 27/04/2013 18:42:19.
1500 tweets, 599 RTs, 421 links. Archive started by Ernesto Priego 27/04/2013 18:42:19 GMT.
#HASTAC2013 Tweet Volume Over Time, with peak on 28/04/13, reaching ∼500 tweets. Archive set up by Ernesto Priego
#HASTAC2013 Tweet Volume Over Time, with peak on 28/04/13, reaching ∼500 tweets. Archive set up by Ernesto Priego

I have archived and shared a version of this blog post as a PDF on Figshare, so it gets a digital object identifier. Citation is:

HASTAC2013 Interactive Archive. Ernesto Priego. figshare.
http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.693045

Retrieved 09:12, Apr 29, 2013 (GMT)

As usual, with many thanks to Martin Hawksey.

Visualising #digitrans

Screenshot of a fragment of a #digitrans TAGSExplorer visualisation
Screenshot of a fragment of a #digitrans TAGSExplorer visualisation, 20/11/2012 1:07 PM GMT

Yesterday I attended the Digital Transformations Moot organised by the Arts and Humanities Research Council in London. My colleague Sarah Quinnell and I participated in the ‘Yack Space’ with a ten-minute flash presentation on our Networked Researcher project. You can view our slides here.

This morning I used Martin Hawksey‘s TAGSExplorer to create a visualisation of a Google spreadsheet archive of the #digitrans tweets. You can view it here.

By tweaking the visualisation’s URL you can also see the nodes connected by @ mentions and @ replies, here.

And if you want to push your browser to the limit and see web entanglement in full effect, the archive can also visualise RTs (here).

Note that the visualisation is in fact an interactive, searchable arhive. You can click on nodes to find out more and also search by keyword.

The Google spreadsheet archive was created once the event had finished (this morning around 9:00am GMT) and it updates itself every fifteen minutes. Nevertheless since the RL event officially concluded last night we can argue most of the event’s backchannel tweets have been collected. At the time of writing this post the archive had collected 1517 unique tweets:

#digitrans archive summary with top 20 tweeters
 #digitrans archive summary with top 20 tweeters. Screen shot taken 20/11/2012 12:48 PM GMT.

As expected most of the tweets were posted during the day of the event (19 November 2012), with some activity some days before and the day after:

#digitrans tweet volume over time graph
 #digitrans tweet volume over time. Screenshot taken 20/11/2012 12:54  PM GMT.

The top tweeters were divided between the organisers, speakers and attendants:

#digitrans top tweeters percentages pie chart
#digitrans top tweeters percentages. Screenshot taken 12:53 PM GMT.

I have found Martin Hawksey’s tool very useful to collect, archive, visualise and analyse Twitter activity, particularly academic conference backchannels. It offers a way of revealing the intrinsically networked and social (as in, involving human interaction) nature of a Twitter’s stream data.

As a form of data mining and distant reading, visualising archives of Twitter backchannels (and therefore networks) can be a useful way of demonstrating an event’s public impact and of discovering key participants, topics, sentiment and links.