This was 2019 in The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship (Vol. 9)

Comics Grid logo

It’s that time of the year and at The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship we are closing our 9th volume, corresponding to 2019. We are getting ready for the holidays and next year.

Here’s a listing of the articles we published during 2019 by section:

Research

Lipenga, K.J., 2019. The New Normal: Enfreakment in Saga. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.2. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.161

Davies, P.F., 2019. New Choices of the Comics Creator. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.3. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.153

Grant, P., 2019. The Board and the Body: Material Constraints and Style in Graphic Narrative. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.4. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.145

del Rey Cabero, E., 2019. Beyond Linearity: Holistic, Multidirectional, Multilinear and Translinear Reading in Comics. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.5. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.137

McGovern, M. and Eve, M.P., 2019. Information Labour and Shame in Farmer and Chevli’s Abortion Eve. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.6. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.158

Hornsby, I., 2019. …Comic Books, Möbius Strips, Philosophy and…. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.7. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.151

Pickering, T., 2019. Diabetes Year One. Drawing my Pathography: Comics, Poetry and the Medical Self. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.8. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.147

Hagan, R.J., 2019. Touch Me/Don’t Touch Me: Representations of Female Archetypes in Ann Nocenti’s Daredevil. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.9. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.148

Misemer, L., 2019. A Historical Approach to Webcomics: Digital Authorship in the Early 2000s. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.10. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.162

Tan, X., 2019. Guoxue Comics: Visualising Philosophical Concepts and Cultural Values through Sequential Narratives. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.11. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.149

Austin, H.J., 2019. “That Old Black Magic”: Noir and Music in Juan Díaz Canales and Juanjo Guarnido’s Blacksad. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.12. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.156

Kottas, L. and Schwarzenbacher, M., 2019. The Comic at the Crossroads: The Semiotics of ‘Voodoo Storytelling’ in The Hole: Consumer Culture Vol. 1. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.13. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.150

Dodds, N., 2019. The Practice of Authentication: Adapting Pilgrimage from Nenthead into a Graphic Memoir. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.14. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.154

Manouach, I., 2019. Peanuts minus Schulz: Distributed Labor as a Compositional Practice. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.16. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.139

D’Arcy, J., 2019. Troubling Boundaries and Negotiating Dominant Culture: Fun Home as a Transmedial Text. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.17. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.146

Review

Evans, J., 2019. Challenging Adaptation Studies: A Review of Comics and Adaptation. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.1. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.159

Commentary

Christmas, S., 2019. The Citi Exhibition Manga マンガ (British Museum, 2019). The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.15. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.181

Creating Comics, Creative Comics

As you can see from the list above for us in the journal our 9th volume had a strong focus on the Special Collection: Creating Comics, Creative Comics.

The collection expanded on the themes of the symposium held in June 2018 at the University of South Wales, Cardiff.

Edited by Geraint D’Arcy (University of South Wales), Brian Fagence (University of South Wales) and Yours Truly (City, University of London), this collection sought to explore the dilemmas and potentials of construction and creation, ideology and authorship, philosophies and embodiment, histories and practices. It’s been both a pleasure and an honour to collaborate with Geraint and Brian and all the authors and reviewers. An editorial rounding up the collection is forthcoming next year.

Articles published in this collection were listed at https://www.comicsgrid.com/collections/special/creating-comics-creative-comics/.

Contribute

The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship seeks scholarly submissions on the technical, theoretical, cultural, and historical aspects of comics studies that gives vitality to the form and challenges readers’ assumptions about it.

Our current call for papers was published on 30th October 2019 on the journal web site and it is available to download as a PDF from figshare:

Priego, E.; Wilkins, P.; Dunley, K. (2019): The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship: Call for Papers 2019-2020. City, University of London. Online resource. https://doi.org/10.25383/city.10100252.v1

If you are interested in submitting work for review or you just want to find out more about the journal, or catch up with all our previous volumes, please do click on https://www.comicsgrid.com/!

It must be said again: the Journal is only possible because of the work volunteered by our editors, reviewers and authors: thank you all!

I would also like to thank the Open Library of Humanities (https://www.openlibhums.org/) for their ongoing support: without their funding we wouldn’t be able to do what we do.

We always need academic reviewers. If you would like to become a peer reviewer, please register, including enough details of your areas of expertise, at https://www.comicsgrid.com/author/register/reviewer/.

Wishing you all a very happy Christmas and an excellent new year 2020! Looking forward to The Comics Grid’s 10th volume!

This was January-August 2019 at The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship

Comics Grid logo

Here’s a listing of the articles we have published so far in 2019 in the journal (our 9th volume!) until the 30th of August 2019.

Research

Lipenga, K.J., 2019. The New Normal: Enfreakment in Saga. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.2. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.161

Davies, P.F., 2019. New Choices of the Comics Creator. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.3. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.153

Grant, P., 2019. The Board and the Body: Material Constraints and Style in Graphic Narrative. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.4. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.145

del Rey Cabero, E., 2019. Beyond Linearity: Holistic, Multidirectional, Multilinear and Translinear Reading in Comics. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.5. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.137

McGovern, M. and Eve, M.P., 2019. Information Labour and Shame in Farmer and Chevli’s Abortion Eve. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.6. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.158

Hornsby, I., 2019. …Comic Books, Möbius Strips, Philosophy and…. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.7. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.151

Pickering, T., 2019. Diabetes Year One. Drawing my Pathography: Comics, Poetry and the Medical Self. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.8. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.147

Hagan, R.J., 2019. Touch Me/Don’t Touch Me: Representations of Female Archetypes in Ann Nocenti’s Daredevil. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.9. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.148

Misemer, L., 2019. A Historical Approach to Webcomics: Digital Authorship in the Early 2000s. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.10. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.162

Tan, X., 2019. Guoxue Comics: Visualising Philosophical Concepts and Cultural Values through Sequential Narratives. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.11. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.149

Austin, H.J., 2019. “That Old Black Magic”: Noir and Music in Juan Díaz Canales and Juanjo Guarnido’s Blacksad. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.12. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.156

Kottas, L. and Schwarzenbacher, M., 2019. The Comic at the Crossroads: The Semiotics of ‘Voodoo Storytelling’ in The Hole: Consumer Culture Vol. 1. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.13. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.150 

Dodds, N., 2019. The Practice of Authentication: Adapting Pilgrimage from Nenthead into a Graphic Memoir. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.14. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.154

Review

Evans, J., 2019. Challenging Adaptation Studies: A Review of Comics and Adaptation. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.1. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.159

Commentary

Christmas, S., 2019. The Citi Exhibition Manga マンガ (British Museum, 2019). The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.15. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.181

Creating Comics, Creative Comics

As you can see from the list above for us in the journal this year has had a strong focus on the Special Collection: Creating Comics, Creative Comics.

The collection expands on the themes of the symposium held in June 2018 at the University of South Wales, Cardiff.

Edited by Geraint D’Arcy (University of South Wales),  Brian Fagence (University of South Wales) and Yours Truly (City, University of London), this collection seeks to explore the dilemmas and potentials of construction and creation, ideology and authorship, philosophies and embodiment, histories and practices. It’s been both a pleasure and an honour to collaborate with Geraint and Brian and all the authors and reviewers.

Articles published in this collection are listed at https://www.comicsgrid.com/collections/special/creating-comics-creative-comics/ .

More articles to come!

Please note that we are currently closed for submissions until 1st November 2019. Please keep an eye on Twitter and our journal web site for news. We are currently working in drafting our new Call for Papers with revised guidelines.

If you are interested in submitting work for review or you just want to find out more about the journal, or catch up with all our previous volumes, please do click on https://www.comicsgrid.com/!

We always need academic reviewers. If you would like to become a peer reviewer, please register, including enough details of your areas of expertise, at https://www.comicsgrid.com/author/register/reviewer/.

 

The Comics Grid: 2017 So Far

2017: A Very Good Year

We know you are busy. It’s been quite a year for everyone. For us at The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship it’s been a very busy year with submissions all year round.

We’d like to thank you all for your readership and engagement. We are infinitely grateful to all our editors, reviewers and authors: thank you! We would also like to thank the Open Library of Humanities for their ongoing support: without their funding we wouldn’t be able to do what we do.

Here’s a listing of the articles we have published so far in 2017 (our 7th volume!), until the 22nd of December:

Research

Ursini, F.-A., (2017). David Bowie’s Influence on JoJo’s Bizarre Adventure. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship. 7, p.1. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.95

Ursini, F.-A., (2017). Themes, Focalization and the Flow of Information: The Case of Shingeki no Kyojin. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship. 7, p.2. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.83

Juricevic, I., (2017). Aladdin Sane and Close-Up Eye Asymmetry: David Bowie’s Contribution to Comic Book Visual Language. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship. 7, p.4. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.94

Humphrey, A., (2017). The Cult of Krazy Kat: Memory and Recollection in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship. 7, p.8. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.97

Earle, H., (2017). Framing Violence and Serial Murder in My Friend Dahmer and Green River Killer. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship. 7, p.5. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.99

Chung, M.-Y., (2017). The Humanity of the Zombie: A Case Study of a Korean Zombie Comic. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship. 7, p.6. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.81

Humphrey, A., (2017). The Cult of Krazy Kat: Memory and Recollection in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship. 7, p.8. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.97

Curtis, N., (2017). Doom’s Law: Spaces of Sovereignty in Marvel’s Secret Wars. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship. 7, p.9. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.90

Nurse, A., (2017). See No Evil, Print No Evil: The Criminalization of Free Speech in DMZ. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship. 7, p.10. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.88

Lee, J., (2017). Black Bleeds and the Sites of a Trauma in GB Tran’s Vietnamerica. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship. 7, p.12. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.104

Martin, C., (2017). With, Against or Beyond Print? Digital Comics in Search of a Specific Status. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship. 7, p.13. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.106

Botes, M., (2017). Using Comics to Communicate Legal Contract Cancellation. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship. 7, p.14. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.100

Fontaine, J., (2017). Illusion, Kayfabe, and Identity Performance in Box Brown and Brandon Easton’s Andre the Giant Graphic Biographies. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship. 7, p.17. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.96

Review

Labarre, N., (2017). Coming to Life: A Review of Movie Comics: Page to Screen/Screen to Page. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship. 7, p.3. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.105

Davies, D., (2017). A Review of Threadbare: Clothes, Sex and Trafficking. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship. 7, p.7. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.110

Godfrey, A.P., (2017). The Ethical Zombie: A Review of The Walking Med: Zombies and The Medical Image. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship. 7, p.11. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.112

Bussone, A., (2017). Experiencing the History of HIV/AIDS: A Review of Taking Turns. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship. 7, p.15. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.116

Clarke Gray, B., (2017). Cap the Chameleon: A Review of Captain America, Masculinity, and Violence. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship. 7, p.16. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.120

Interview

Davies, D., (2017). Comics Activism: An Interview with Comics Artist and Activist Kate Evans. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship. 7, p.18. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.114

Prize-winning Open Access Scholarship!

We were delighted to that Aleisha Ward’s article, “New Zealand Jazz Concerts, the Use and Abuse of Grand Pianos, and One Cartoonist’s Response”  won the prestigious Rebecca Coyle Prize this year. Read more about the prize here: https://www.openlibhums.org/news/266/

We also celebrated that Benoît Crucifix’s article, “Witnessing Fukushima Secondhand: Collage, Archive and Travelling Memory in Jacques Ristorcelli’s Les Écrans” won honorary mention at the inaugural Best Online Comics Studies Scholarship Award (BOCSS), announced at the Massachusetts Independent Comics Expo (MICE) 2017 at the Lesley University campus.

Many congratulations to both Aleisha and Benoît!

If you submitted work during 2017 and your submission is still under review please accept our gratitude for your patience and understanding. Believe us: we know how frustrating scholarly publishing can be. After 7 years we remain a relatively small operation, and the volume of submissions this year increased significantly, which has meant longer waiting times for authors. This is far from ideal, but we keep working hard to find ways to continue engaging in faster and more efficient and rigorous editorial processes. Thank you once again for bearing with us.

If you are interested in submitting work for review or you just want to find out more about the journal, or catch up with all our previous volumes, please do click on https://www.comicsgrid.com/!

We are also in constant need for academic reviewers. If you would like to become a peer reviewer, please register, including your areas of expertise, at https://www.comicsgrid.com/author/register/reviewer/.

Special thanks to Peter Wilkins, Nicolas Labarre, Benoît Crucifix , Thom Giddens, Lise Tannahill, Enrique del Rey, Ana Cristina de Lion, Sam Moore, Peter Ford, Abhijit Pathre, Andy Byers, Martin Eve, and Caroline Edwards, who made this such a good year for The Grid.

Here’s looking forward to a 2018 full of open access comics scholarship!

The 2016 Altmetric Top 100 Outputs with ‘Comics’ as Keyword

screen-shot-2016-12-21-at-17-27-25

Any frequent readers of this blog will be aware I am interested in article level metrics. I am particularly interested in the work done by Altmetric. Last week they published their annual top 100 list. I wrote this post about it.

 The Altmetric Explorer is a tool for measuring the attention that scholarly articles receive online, and its intuitive user interface works as a live searchable database that allows users to browse the journals and repositories Altmetric tracks and obtain detailed reports.

On a weekly basis Altmetric captures hundreds of thousands of tweets, blog posts, news stories, Facebook walls and other content that mentions scholarly articles on the Web. The Explorer can browse, search and filter this data. The data can be exported by the user as ‘reports’ as simple text or spreadsheets, which can be then analysed in different forms. For example, The Explorer provides demographic data of the Twitter users found mentioning specific outputs, and thus works as a mechanism for the study of academic users of social media.

In the past few years I have often suggested, online, in talks, workshops and lectures, that the Altmetric Explorer can be useful to researchers as well. Librarians with access to the tool can help students and researchers get new views of recent articles that are receiving attention online. People often focus on ‘altmetrics’ as indicators of online activity around published outputs, but I often insist the Altmetric Explorer is useful as well as a tool for searching, discovering, collecting, creating, archiving, sharing and analysing bibliographic reference collections as datasets including not just bibliographic data including identifiers and/or URLs but also historical data of any metrics the service has tracked and quantified at the time of the data query/collection.

Inspired by Altmetric’s annual Top 100 list I used the Altmetric Explorer to search for the top articles with keyword ‘comics’ mentioned in the past 1 year. I did this particular search on the morning of Tuesday 20 December 2016. Dating the collection (and indicating the specific query) is always important as social media metrics are hopefully dynamic and not static (i.e. we expect an output’s altmetrics to change over time).

After my query I saved as usual my search as  a ‘workspace’ on the app and then exported the dataset as a CSV file. I then manually cleaned and refined the data to obtain a file listing the top 100 references specifically on comics including their altmetrics. Data refining was needed to ensure the list included articles about comics, eliminating any non-relevant outputs (i.e. they were not about comics) and to correct text rendering errors, add missing data (like output titles when missing from the initial export) and limit the set to only 100 items by deleting the extra outputs.*

I have deposited and shared the dataset as

Priego, Ernesto (2016): The 2016 Altmetric Top 100 Outputs with ‘Comics’ as Keyword Mentioned in the Past 1 Year. figshare. https://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.4483631.v4 Retrieved: 17 06, Dec 21, 2016 (GMT)

Hopefully it will be of interest to some of you out there. For comparison here’s these other datasets I have deposited on figshare in previous years:

Priego, Ernesto (2015): Almetrics of articles from the comics journals mentioned at least once in the past 1 year as tracked by Altmetric (20 August 2015). figshare. https://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.1514985.v3 Retrieved: 17 21, Dec 21, 2016 (GMT)

and

Priego, Ernesto (2014): Comics Journals Articles Tracked by Altmetric in the last year (Dec 2013-Dec 2014). figshare. https://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.1273850.v4 Retrieved: 17 23, Dec 21, 2016 (GMT)

 

Though the two datasets above are outputs from different search queries (focusing on specific comics journals tracked by Altmetric rather than in any articles with keyword ‘comics’) we should we able to continue collecting data for future transversal studies.

Having yearly datasets obtained from the same queries, over a series of years, would provide evidence of comics scholarship’s presence online, and of the field’s (and Altmetric’s)  evolving practices.

*It is possible the degree of relevance varies. Some outputs do not have ‘comics’ in their title but do discuss comics, for example ‘A randomized study of multimedia informational aids for research on medical practices: Implications for informed consent’ (Kraft et al 2016). It is possible however that a non-comics article or two remained, if you spot one do please let me know or leave a comment on the figshare output and I will correct and create a new version. It might also be noted that various outputs included are from The Conversation, which is not an academic journal, but it is tracked by Altmetric as it focuses on academic research news written by academics. For information and context about how Altmetric sources the data please read this.

The Technology of Storytelling. Audio of my 1999 interview with Will Eisner now online

m-430 micro-cassette tape recorder - will eisner tape

I interviewed Will Eisner about storytelling in Mexico City on 2 May 1999. I have digitised the original tape recording, edited my questions out and uploaded the mp3 file to figshare.

I interviewed Will Eisner (March 6, 1917 – January 3, 2005) on Sunday 2 May 1999 at the Conque Comic Convention in Mexico City.

I recorded the interview using a Sony M-430 microcassette-recorder. Both the tape recorder and the tape were beginning to fail so I digitised the recording as an mp3 file, and edited out my questions (you don’t need them– he says it all).

I have deposited it as an mp3 file on figshare, open access, hoping other comics researchers find it useful, with a Creative Commons – Attribution License:

Priego, Ernesto (2014): “The Technology of Storytelling.” An Interview with Will Eisner. Sunday 2 May 1999, Mexico City. figshare. http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.1257786

For an edited transcription of this interview, see my 2011 HASTAC blog post (3/7/2011).

A belated #Transitions4 Archive, and a post summarising some data about comics scholars on Twitter

 Comics Scholars on Twitter? Yeah, A Few…

A very long title to announce I have finally published an archive of #transitions4 (2013) I collected more than a year ago, and that I have published a post on The Comics Grid blog summarising some data from my archives of tweets from comics conferences this year. Links below.

A #transitions4 Archive. figshare.

http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.1252098

“Comics Scholars on Twitter? Yeah, A Few…” The Comics Grid blog, 26 November 2014.

 

A #Transitions5, #ComicsForum14 and #ICAF14 Archive

Figshare archive screenshot

I have created and uploaded a file that contains three archives of Tweets corresponding to the #Transitions5, #ComicsForum14 and #ICAF14 hashtags (case not sensitive).

 I created and shared this file on figshare with a Creative Commons- Attribution license (CC-BY) for academic research and educational use.

The three archives contain 2173 Tweets published publicly and tagged with #Transitions5, #ComicsForum14 and #ICAF14.

It can be accessed and downloaded at

Priego, Ernesto (2014): A #Transitions5, #ComicsForum14 and #ICAF14 Archive. figshare.

http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.1250083

The Tweets contained in the file were collected using Martin Hawksey’s TAGS 5.1 and TAGS 6.0

I also included some quick comparative insights from the three archives (Summary sheet).

More information included in the file itself.

As usual please note the data in this file is likely to require further refining and even deduplication. The data reflects the methods and periods of collection and is shared as is.

This dataset is shared to encourage open research into scholarly activity on Twitter.  If you use or refer to this data in any way please cite and link back using the citation information above.

Featured at City University London News: Taking Comics Seriously

 Taking Comics Seriously

I was featured today in the news section of City University London’s web site.

The piece is titled “Taking Comics Seriously”.

I am interviewed about my work,  The Comics Grid and about how comics scholarship can benefit the academic community.

Screen Shot 2014Fragment of a panel from Ronan Deazley’s and Jason Mathis’s Writing About Comics and Copyright (2013:1:3)
Fragment of a panel from Ronan Deazley’s and Jason Mathis’s Writing About Comics and Copyright (2013:1:3)

The interview is illustrated with a page from “Writing about Comics and Copyright” by Ronan Deazley and Jason Mathis (RCUK Centre for Copyright and New Business Models in the Creative Economy, 2013), which features The Comics Grid as an example of good practice in comic art citation and attribution.With thanks to John Stevenson at City University London.

City University London: Taking Comics Seriously.

At The New Everyday: The Multimodality of Comics in Everyday Life

the new everyday a media commons project  logo

I am very happy to announce the publication of a new cluster at MediaCommons’ The New Everyday:

The Multimodality of Comics in Everyday Life” edited and curated by David N. Wright and myself.

The New Everyday is a MediaCommons Project, powered by New York University’s Digital Library Technology Services.

http://mediacommons.futureofthebook.org/tne/cluster/multimodality-comics-everyday-life

This is a collection of short articles exploring how comics infiltrate everyday cultural representations in ways that go beyond extensions of the printed page.

Architecture, design, sex, web browsers, current politics, celebrity magazines, fandom, cities and advertising: the articles in this cluster explore just a few examples of comics not as a fixed paradigm, but as multimodality itself.

As an international, multidisciplinary, collaborative online project, featuring a diverse range of scholarly timbre, this cluster is an experiment in online comics scholarship that offers a different kind of output than what might normally be expected from journal articles.

If comics are to move off the page, then this cluster actively resists such associations as it strives for a kind of liminal, fragmentary scholarship that suggests offerings in search of responses.

Contents:

*Ernesto Priego and David N. Wright, Introduction: The Multimodality of Comics in Everyday Life

*Damon Herd, It’s All Comics: How Comics Scholars View The World

*Nicole Pacas, Comics—They’re just like Us!: The Yellow Kid and Celebrity Gossip Magazines

*Ludovica Price, Fan Comics: Comics as Fan Sense-Making in the Everyday

*Brenna Clarke Gray, What We (don’t) Talk about When We Talk about Sex

*Peter Wilkins, Life on the Grid: Comics and the Everyday

*Harriet Kennedy, Superheroes and Referendums in Quebec and Scotland

*Ernesto Priego, Popping Up: Cities and Comics as Common Place 

*David N. Wright, Comics are the New Everyday Aesthetic and Socio-Cultural Paradigm

The cluster  licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

With many thanks to all the contributors and Shannon Mattern at School of Media Studies, The New School, and Mark Reilly at New York University.

3 November: Transitions 3, Programme

Transitions 3 banner

Although this event is free to attend, please register your attendance by email at transitions.symposium AT gmail Dot com!

The programme for the Comica Symposium 2012, Transitions 3: Mapping New Directions in Comics Studies is now available:

TRANSITIONS 3 – New Directions in Comics Studies
Birkbeck College
Main building, Torrington Square, London
Saturday 3rd of November 2012
9.30–10.00   REGISTRATION    
10.00 – 10.15 (Room B. 36) WELCOME(S)
10.15 – 11.15  (Room B. 36) KEYNOTE – Julia Round and Chris Murray  – ‘Title TBC
11.15 –11.25  SHORT BREAK
11.25 –12.40 (Room B. 36) 
Panel 1 – Image and narrative; chair: Ann Miller
John Miers: ‘Comics authorship and the relations between visual form and narrative content’
Paul Davies: ‘Animating the narrative in abstract comics’
Federico Pagello: ‘The Cinematic Superhero: comic book imagination and the aesthetic regime’
12.40–13.30   LUNCH  (own arrangements)
13.30 – 14.50 (Room B. 36)
Panel 2 – Contextual convergences; chair: Ernesto Priego
Matthew Freeman:  ‘An historical approach to transmedia storytelling: Superman and the convergence of comics and other media in the classical Hollywood era’
Paul Williams: ‘Art Spiegelman and J. B. Rund: The making and marketing of ‘Adult  Comics’ in the 1970s’
Caroline Dahl: ‘Comics disseminating science’      
13.30 – 14.50 (Room B.02)
Panel 3 – Politics and Representation; chair: Tony Venezia
Louisa Buck: ‘The boulder of Sisyphus in British political cartoons’
Harriet Earle: ‘Traumatic representation and 9/11 in American Widow’
Jonathan W. Gray: “Representing Revolt in Graphic Media: Magdy El Shafee, Martin Luther King, Jr and the Arab Spring”.
14.50 – 15.20       BREAK   (refreshments)
15. 20 – 17pm (Room B. 36)
Panel 4 – Imagined Communities: Culture and Identity; chair: Jason Dittmer
Adam Sherif: ‘The duality of 1940s Wonder Woman comics: the war heroine in whose culture men do not feature’
Bharain Mac an Breithiún: ’The comic strip and the street sign – linguistic landscape and sense of place in Brussels’
Daniel Marrone: ‘Seth’s historiographic metafiction: forging Canadian histories’
Simon Turner: ‘Japan Online: ethnic identity, culture and race in Yaoi manga fan websites’
17pm–18pm (Room B. 36) Respondent’s remarks and round-table discussion
Roger Sabin (UAL), Paul Gravett (Comica), Chris Murray & Julia Round (StiC), Ernesto Priego (Comics Grid), Ian Hague (Comics Forum) and Tony Venezia (Transitions, The Contemporary Fiction Seminar)
18pm –19pm   WINE RECEPTION, in B. 02
Although this event is free to attend, please register your attendance by email at transitions.symposium AT gmail Dot com!

Transitions 3: Mapping New Directions in Comics Studies

Transitions 3 banner

Update: the programme is available here.

On Saturday the 3rd of November 2012 I’ll be at  the Comica Symposium 2012 – Transitions 3: New directions in comic studies at Birkbeck College, University of London. I’ll be chairing the second panel, titled  “Contextual Convergences”, from 13.30 to 14.50 hrs.

Transitions is a one-day symposium promoting new research and multi-disciplinary academic study of comics/ comix/ manga/ bande dessinée and other forms of sequential art, now in its third year. For more information click on the poster below or the link above.

Transitions 3 Poster

Guest Speaker for the Electronic Publishing Module, UCL

UCL logo

Simon Mahony has kindly invited me to be a guest speaker on Monday 15th October 2012 at the Electronic Publishing module he teaches at University College London (UCL). Simon is a Teaching Fellow in Digital Humanities at the Centre for Digital Humanities and is the Programme Director for the MA/MSc Digital Humanities.

I will be talking about various issues surrounding comics digitisation, encoding, archiving and electronic publishing. The main reading I suggested is

Walsh, J.A. (2012) “Comic Book Markup Language: An Introduction and Rationale”. DH Quarterly, Volume 6, Number 1. <http://digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/6/1/000117/000117.html/>.

Students might also want to read my post “Surface is Profound: Notes on Comic Book Matter(s)”
<http://hastac.org/blogs/ernesto-priego/surface-profound-notes-comic-book-matters/>.

There are other texts that would help students prepare for this session. A complete bibliography will be available on the module’s web page.

The day will also include a hands-on session where we will be working directly with some comics. No familiarity with XML will be needed at this stage. We will be thinking through the physical characteristics of the publications and the layout/design of the pages, recognising essential elements of comic book textuality as present in specific examples.

One of the objectives will be to make students aware of the practical implications of thinking analytically about content/format.

I’d like to thank Simon Mahony and UCLDIS/DH for this kind invitation. Looking forward to it!