The Lockdown Chronicles 23: Audre

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Audre works in a factory.
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A self-described “black, lesbian, mother, warrior, poet,” Audre Lorde (February 18, 1934 – November 17, 1992) dedicated both her life and her creative talent to confronting and addressing injustices of racism, sexism, classism, and homophobia. As described in her 1982 book Zami A New Spelling of My Name. A Biomythography, as a young person she worked operating an x-ray machine cutting quartz crystals in an electronics factory in Stamford, CT, in very dangerous conditions. [Wikipedia entry] [Poetry Foundation]

Text sources: Lorde, Audre (1982) Zami A New Spelling of My Name. A Biomythography. Penguin; CT Department of Public Health COVID19 Dashboard; amFAR, COVID-19 Racial Disparities in U.S. Counties; Wadhera RK, Wadhera P, Gaba P, et al. (April 29, 2020) Variation in COVID-19 Hospitalizations and Deaths Across New York City Boroughs. JAMA. doi:10.1001/jama.2020.7197; Siddique, Haroon (1 May 2020) “British BAME Covid-19 death rate ‘more than twice that of whites'”, the Guardian;  Lorde, Audre, “The Transformation of Silence into Language and Action”, MLA, December 28, 1977.

Source image: photograph of Audre Lorde by Elsa Dorfman (1937–) via Wikimedia Commons. GNU Free Documentation License. This comic strip CC-BY-NC-SA.

References

Lorde, Audre (1982) Zami A New Spelling of My Name. A Biomythography. Penguin. [Internet Archive]

Lorde, Audre, “The Transformation of Silence into Language and Action”, MLA, December 28, 1977. [Internet Archive] First published in Sinister Wisdom 6 (1978) and The Cancer Journals (Spinsters, Ink, San Francisco, 1980).
CT Department of Public Health COVID19 Dashboard. Available at https://maps.ct.gov/portal/apps/opsdashboard/index.html#/48d54b859c8b4a8e87a0376af3513140 [Accessed 9 May 2020]

amFAR, COVID-19 Racial Disparities in U.S. Counties. Available at https://ehe.amfar.org/disparities  [Accessed 9 May 2020]

Wadhera RK, Wadhera P, Gaba P, et al. (April 29, 2020) Variation in COVID-19 Hospitalizations and Deaths Across New York City Boroughs. JAMA. doi:10.1001/jama.2020.7197 [Accessed 9 May 2020]

Siddique, Haroon (1 May 2020) “British BAME Covid-19 death rate ‘more than twice that of whites'”, the Guardian. Available at https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/may/01/british-bame-covid-19-death-rate-more-than-twice-that-of-whites [Accessed 9 May 2020]

Sanchez, Melissa (24 March 2020). ““Essential” Factory Workers Are Afraid to Go to Work and Can’t Afford to Stay Home”. ProPublica CT. Available at https://www.propublica.org/article/coronavirus-essential-factory-workers-illinois [Accessed 9 May 2020]

The Lockdown Chronicles is a series of periodical comic strips made at night (in candlelight!) adapting and reusing openly-licensed or public domain items from online digital collections. Publication and tweetage are scheduled in advance. Historical sources are adapted and updated for the current pandemic; please refer to each strip’s references on each post for further context.  Catch up with the series at https://epriego.blog/tag/the-lockdown-chronicles/.

The Lockdown Chronicles 22: W.G.

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W.G. is a doctor in Bristol.
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Note: the phrase “it’s just not cricket” is used in English to say that something is unfair or dishonest.

An outstanding all-rounder, William Gilbert “W. G.” Grace MRCS LRCP (18 July 1848 – 23 October 1915) was a an English amateur cricketer and a doctor. He obtained his medical diploma from the University of Edinburgh and qualified as a Licentiate of the Royal College of Physicians (LRCP) and became a Member of the Royal College of Surgeons (MRCS). After qualifying he worked at 61 Stapleton Road in Easton, Bristol, employing two locums during the cricket season. He was the local Public Vaccinator and had additional duties as the Medical Officer to the Barton Regis Union, which involved tending patients in the workhouse (Rae 1998).

W.G. Grace was important in the development of cricket and is widely considered one of its greatest-ever players. Generally known as “W. G.”, he played first-class cricket for a record-equaling 44 seasons, from 1865 to 1908, during which he captained England, Gloucestershire, the Gentlemen, Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC), the United South of England Eleven (USEE) and several other teams. Right-handed as both batsman and bowler, Grace dominated the sport during his career. His technical innovations and enormous influence left a lasting legacy. [Wikipedia entry]

Text sources: Rae, Simon (1998) W. G. Grace: A Life. Faber; Boobyer, Leigh (7 May 2020) “Two-thirds of COVID-19 patients in Gloucestershire’s two main hospitals discharged”, Gloucestershire Live; Campbell, Denis et al (5 May 2020) “Calls for inquiry as UK reports highest Covid-19 death toll in Europe”, The Guardian; Rawlinson, Kevin (7 May 2020) “Coronavirus PPE: all 400,000 gowns flown from Turkey for NHS fail UK standards”. The Guardian.

Source image: portrait of W. G. Grace, Woodburytype, late 1880s, by Herbert Rose Barraud (1845-1896), via Wikimedia Commons, Public Domain. This comic strip CC-BY-NC-SA.

References

Booth, Lawrence, editor (2020) Wisden Cricketers’ Almanack 2020, Wisden, available to buy from https://www.wisden.com/ [Accessed 7 May 2020]

ECB (30 April 2020) “Cricket and COVID-19: your questions answered”, available from https://www.ecb.co.uk/news/1657168/cricket-and-covid-19-your-questions-answered [Accessed 7 May 2020]

Rae, Simon (1998) W. G. Grace: A Life. Faber, available to buy from https://www.faber.co.uk/9780571195732-w-g-grace-a-life.html [Accessed 7 May 2020]

Boobyer, Leigh (7 May 2020) “Two-thirds of COVID-19 patients in Gloucestershire’s two main hospitals discharged”, Gloucestershire Live. Available from https://www.gloucestershirelive.co.uk/news/health/two-thirds-covid-19-patients-4112573  [Accessed 7 May 2020]

Campbell, Denis et al (5 May 2020) “Calls for inquiry as UK reports highest Covid-19 death toll in Europe”, The Guardian. Available from https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/may/05/uk-coronavirus-death-toll-rises-above-32000-to-highest-in-europe [Accessed 7 May 2020]

Rawlinson, Kevin (7 May 2020) “Coronavirus PPE: all 400,000 gowns flown from Turkey for NHS fail UK standards”. The Guardian. Available from https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/may/07/all-400000-gowns-flown-from-turkey-for-nhs-fail-uk-standards [Accessed 7 May 2020]

Barraud, Herbert Rose (late 1880s)  Portrait of W. G. Grace, cricketeer,  Woodburytype, via Wikimedia Commons, available at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/W._G._Grace#/media/File:W._G._Grace,_cricketer,_by_Herbert_Rose_Barraud.jpg [Accessed 7 May 2020]

 

The Lockdown Chronicles is a series of periodical comic strips made at night (in candlelight!) adapting and reusing openly-licensed or public domain items from online digital collections. Publication and tweetage are scheduled in advance. Historical sources are adapted and updated for the current pandemic; please refer to each strip’s references on each post for further context.  Catch up with the series at https://epriego.blog/tag/the-lockdown-chronicles/.

The Lockdown Chronicles 21: Fernando

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Fernando reflects.
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Fernando António Nogueira Pessoa (13 June 1888 – 30 November 1935) was a Portuguese poet, writer, literary critic, translator, publisher and philosopher, described as one of the most significant literary figures of the 20th century and one of the greatest poets in the Portuguese language. He also wrote in and translated from English and French [Wikipedia entry].

Published posthumously, The Book of Disquiet is a fragmentary lifetime project, left unedited by Fernando Pessoa, who introduced it as a “factless autobiography.” The book was credited to Bernardo Soares, one of the author’s alternate writing names, which he called semi-heteronyms, and had a preface attributed to Fernando Pessoa, another alternate writing name or orthonym [Wikipedia entry].

On 29 November 1935, Fernando Pessoa (1888–1935), suffering from abdominal pain and a high fever, was taken to the Hospital de São Luís. There he wrote, in English, his last words: “I know not what tomorrow will bring.” He died the next day, aged 47. (Ciuraru 2011).

Text sources: Direção-Geral da Saúde COVID-19 site, https://covid19.min-saude.pt/; Pessoa, Fernando (2003) The Book of Disquiet, translated by Richard Zenith, Penguin Classics; ; Ciuraru, Carmela (2011) Nom de Plume: A (Secret) History of Pseudonyms, HarperCollins.

Source image: photograph of Fernando Pessoa, ca. 1914, via Wikimedia Commons. Public Domain. This comic strip CC-BY-NC-SA.

References

Direção-Geral da Saúde (2020) COVID-19 site, available at  https://covid19.min-saude.pt/ [Accessed 6 May 2020]

Pessoa, Fernando (2003) The Book of Disquiet, tr. Richard Zenith, Penguin Classics. Excerpt available at http://www.freebooks8.com/Fiction_Library/3561/114.html [Accessed 6 May 2020]

Ciuraru, Carmela (2011) Nom de Plume: A (Secret) History of Pseudonyms, HarperCollins. Excerpt available via the Poetry Society of America at https://poetrysociety.org/features/tributes/fernando-pessoa-his-heteronyms [Accessed 6 May 2020]

Casa Fernando Pessoa, Lisbon, available at https://www.casafernandopessoa.pt/pt/cfp [Accessed 6 May 2020]

The Lockdown Chronicles is a series of periodical comic strips made at night (in candlelight!) adapting and reusing openly-licensed or public domain items from online digital collections. Publication and tweetage are scheduled in advance. Historical sources are adapted and updated for the current pandemic; please refer to each strip’s references on each post for further context.  Catch up with the series at https://epriego.blog/tag/the-lockdown-chronicles/.

The Lockdown Chronicles 20: Edith

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Edith is studying to become a nurse.
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As in the rest of this series, this is a homage; liberties were taken with the historical source material.

Edith Louisa Cavell (4 December 1865 – 12 October 1915) was a British nurse. She is celebrated for saving the lives of soldiers from both sides without discrimination and in helping some 200 Allied soldiers escape from German-occupied Belgium during the First World War, for which she was arrested. She was accused of treason, found guilty by a court-martial and sentenced to death. Despite international pressure for mercy, she was shot by a German firing squad. Her execution received worldwide condemnation and extensive press coverage. The night before her execution, she said, “Patriotism is not enough. I must have no hatred or bitterness towards anyone.” These words were later inscribed on a memorial to her near Trafalgar Square. Her strong Anglican beliefs propelled her to help all those who needed it, both German and Allied soldiers. She was quoted as saying, “I can’t stop while there are lives to be saved.” The Church of England commemorates her in its Calendar of Saints on 12 October. Cavell, who was 49 at the time of her execution, was already notable as a pioneer of modern nursing in Belgium. [Wikipedia entry]

Source texts:  Belgian Edith Cavell Commemoration Group, (2015) “Edith Cavell Story”; Pickles, Katie (2017) “Cavell, Edith Louisa”, International Encyclopedia of the First World War, Freie Universität Berlin, Berlin; quotes from St George’s Hospital medical staff as quoted in Bayley, Sian (23 March 2020) “Coronavirus deaths at St George’s Hospital rises to 15”, News. The Wandsworth Times; White, Emma (2016) A History of Britain in 100 Dogs, Cheltenham: The History Press.

Source images: Panel 1: Harcourt, Bosworth W. Swardeston Common, August 15 1895 (drawing, Norwich Castle Museum & Art Gallery, © Norfolk Museums Service, CC-BY-NC-SA 4.0 Panels 2-4: Edith Louisa Cavell in Red Cross uniform. Colour process print after E. M. Ross, 1915. Wellcome Library no. 9872i, Wellcome Images, Wellcome Collection. CC-BY 4.0. This comic strip CC-BY-NC-SA.

References

Belgian Edith Cavell Commemoration Group, (2015) “Edith Cavell Story”; available at http://www.edith-cavell-belgium.eu/edith-cavell-story.html [Accessed 5 May 2020]

Pickles, Katie: Cavell, Edith Louisa (Version 1.1), in: 1914-1918-online. International Encyclopedia of the First World War, ed. by Ute Daniel, Peter Gatrell, Oliver Janz, Heather Jones, Jennifer Keene, Alan Kramer, and Bill Nasson, issued by Freie Universität Berlin, Berlin 2017-01-24. DOI: 10.15463/ie1418.10214/1.1. [Accessed 5 May 2020]

Tweets by Tooting MP and A&E doctor at St George’s Hospital, Dr Rosena Allin-Khan, and Dr Lisa Anderson, consultant cardiologist at St George’s Hospital, to the BBC’s Andrew Marr (22 March 2020), as quoted by Bayley, Sian (23 March 2020) “Coronavirus deaths at St George’s Hospital rises to 15”, News. The Wandsworth Times, available at  https://www.wandsworthguardian.co.uk/news/18328407.coronavirus-deaths-st-georges-hospital-rises-15/ [Accessed 5 May 2020]

White, Emma (2016) A History of Britain in 100 Dogs, Cheltenham: The History Press. Excerpt available at https://www.thehistorypress.co.uk/articles/edith-cavell-and-her-furry-four-legged-friends/ [Accessed 5 May 2020]

Harcourt, Bosworth W. Swardeston Common, August 15 1895 (drawing) Norwich Castle Museum & Art Gallery, Norfolk Museums Service, available at http://norfolkmuseumscollections.org/collections/objects/object-3860293849.html [Accessed 5 May 2020]

Edith Louisa Cavell in Red Cross uniform. Colour process print after E. M. Ross, 1915. Wellcome Library no. 9872i, Wellcome Images, Wellcome Collection, available at https://wellcomecollection.org/works/ym9xg9kp [Accessed 5 May 2020]

Judson, Helen (1941) “Edith Cavell”. The American Journal of Nursing. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. 41 (7): 871. doi:10.2307/3415077

The Lockdown Chronicles is a series of periodical comic strips made at night (in candlelight!) adapting and reusing openly-licensed or public domain items from online digital collections. Publication and tweetage are scheduled in advance. Historical sources are adapted and updated for the current pandemic; please refer to each strip’s references on each post for further context.  Catch up with the series at https://epriego.blog/tag/the-lockdown-chronicles/.

The Lockdown Chronicles 19: Ricardo

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Ricardo is in prison.
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Original idea and historical image and text research by Ira Franco; adaptation, layout, translation and additional research by Ernesto Priego.

Ricardo Flores Magón (Eloxochitlán, Oaxaca, 16 September 1874 – Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary, Kansas, 22 November 1922) was the main ideologist of the Mexican anarchist movement, a key component for the development of the Mexican Revolution (1910-1920). While in exile in the United States, he was charged with sedition and espionage by the W. Wilson administration and sentenced to twenty years in prison. He died 5 years later, blind from glaucoma and diabetes, in a cell at the Leavenworth Kansas Penitentiary. [Wikipedia entry]

His correspondence during his confinement is available via the Archivo Electrónico Ricardo Flores Magón (INAH, México).

Source texts: Letters from Ricardo Flores Magón (Eloxochitlán, Oaxaca, 16 September 1874 – Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary, Kansas, 22 November 1922) to Raúl Palma (6 August 1918), Nicolás T. Bernal (26 May 1921) and Ellen White (5 April 1921), via Archivo Electrónico Ricardo Flores Magón, INAH, Mexico; Evelyn, Kenya (10 April 2020) “Prison uprising put down as US inmates demand protection from coronavirus”, the Guardian; Bernard, Katie (30 April 2020) “All Lansing prisoners to be tested for COVID-19 after multiple asymptomatic positives”, The Kansas City Star.

Source images: Panel 1: Kansas. Fort Leavenworth. U.S. Military Prison [no date], photographic print, George Grantham Bain Collection, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, no known restrictions on publication; panels 2-4: Ricardo Flores Magón (1978), linocut on paper by Carlos A. Cortés, Smithsonian American Art Museum, Public Domain. This comic strip CC-BY-NC-SA.

 

References

Ricardo Flores Magón, Correspondencia, Archivo Electrónico Ricardo Flores Magón, INAH, Mexico, available at http://archivomagon.net/obras-completas/correspondencia/. [Accessed 4 May 2020]

Letter from Ricardo Flores Magón to Raúl Palma, 6 August 1918, Archivo Electrónico Ricardo Flores Magón, INAH, Mexico. Available at http://archivomagon.net/obras-completas/correspondencia-1899-1922/c-1918/cor361/ [Accessed 4 May 2020]

Letter from Ricardo Flores Magón to Ellen White, 5 April 1921, Archivo Electrónico Ricardo Flores Magón, INAH, Mexico. Available at http://archivomagon.net/obras-completas/correspondencia-1899-1922/c-1921/cor44-2/  [Accessed 4 May 2020]

Letter from Ricardo Flores Magón to Nicolás T. Bernal. 26 May 1921,  Archivo Electrónico Ricardo Flores Magón, INAH, Mexico. Available at http://archivomagon.net/obras-completas/correspondencia-1899-1922/c-1921/cor55-2/ [Accessed 4 May 2020]

U.S. Federal Bureau of Prisons. (Last Updated: Saturday, 25 April 2020)  Inmate Citizenship, Statistics based on prior month’s data. Available at https://www.bop.gov/about/statistics/statistics_inmate_citizenship.jsp [Accessed 4 May 2020]

Bernard, Katie (30 April 2020) “All Lansing prisoners to be tested for COVID-19 after multiple asymptomatic positives”, The Kansas City Star, available via https://www.kansascity.com/news/local/article242408021.html [Accessed 4 May 2020]

Evelyn, Kenya (10 April 2020) “Prison uprising put down as US inmates demand protection from coronavirus”, the Guardian. Available at https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2020/apr/10/us-prisons-coronavirus-uprising-riot [Accessed 4 May 2020]

Kansas. Fort Leavenworth. U.S. Military Prison [no date], photographic print, George Grantham Bain Collection, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division. Available at https://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2005686565/ [Accessed 4 May 2020]

Cortés, Carlos A. (1978) Ricardo Flores Magón. Linocut on paper. Smithsonian American Art Museum. Available at https://americanart.si.edu/artwork/ricardo-flores-magon-33504  [Accessed 4 May 2020]

The Lockdown Chronicles is a series of periodical comic strips made at night (in candlelight!) adapting and reusing openly-licensed or public domain items from online digital collections. Publication and tweetage are scheduled in advance. Historical sources are adapted and updated for the current pandemic; please refer to each strip’s references on each post for further context.  Catch up with the series at https://epriego.blog/tag/the-lockdown-chronicles/.

The Lockdown Chronicles 18: Walt

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Walt sits and looks out.
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Walt Whitman (May 31, 1819 – March 26, 1892) was an American poet, essayist, and journalist. A humanist, he was a part of the transition between transcendentalism and realism, incorporating both views in his works. After suffering a paralytic stroke in early 1873, Whitman was induced to move from Washington to the home of his brother—George Washington Whitman, an engineer—at 431 Stevens Street in Camden, New Jersey. While in residence there he was very productive, publishing three versions of Leaves of Grass among other works. [Wikipedia entry] You can read Leaves of Grass in its entirety via The Walt Whitman Archive.

Source texts: Whitman, Walt (1819 – 1892), “I Sit and Look Out”, from Leaves of Grass (1891–92), via The Walt Whitman Archive, CC BY-NC-SA 3.0; “New Jersey is now reporting more virus deaths per day than New York” in “New York Closes Schools Through End of Academic Year” (1 May 2020), New York. The New York Times;  Benner, Katie (April 13 2020) “Inmates at N.J. Women’s Prison Endured Years of Sex Abuse, Justice Dept. Finds”, Politics. The New York Times; MacFarquhar, Neil (May 3 2020), “The Coronavirus Becomes a Battle Cry for U.S. Extremists”. U.S: The New York Times, © 2020 NYTCo.

Source images: Panel 1: The Walt Whitman House in Camden, NJ (2007), via Wikimedia Commons; Public Domain. Panel 2: Portrait of Walt Whitman taken at Mathew Brady’s studio in Washington, D.C. between 1865 and 1867, wet plate negative, U.S. National Archives 111-B-1672; National Archives Flickr, Unrestricted Use. This comic strip CC-BY-NC-SA.

 

References

Whitman, Walt (1891–92), “I Sit and Look Out”,  from Leaves of Grass, via The Walt Whitman Archive, Gen. ed. Ed Folsom and Kenneth M. Price. Available at https://whitmanarchive.org/published/LG/1891/poems/129 [Accessed 3 May 2020]

“New Jersey is now reporting more virus deaths per day than New York” in “New York Closes Schools Through End of Academic Year” (1 May 2020), New York. The New York Times; available at https://www.nytimes.com/2020/05/01/nyregion/coronavirus-new-york-update.html [Accessed 3 May 2020]

Benner, Katie (13 April 2020) “Inmates at N.J. Women’s Prison Endured Years of Sex Abuse, Justice Dept. Finds”, Politics. The New York Times; available at https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/13/us/politics/prisons-civil-rights-justice-department.html  [Accessed 3 May 2020]

MacFarquhar, Neil (3 May 2020), “The Coronavirus Becomes a Battle Cry for U.S. Extremists”. U.S: The New York Times, available at https://www.nytimes.com/2020/05/03/us/coronavirus-extremists.html  [Accessed 3 May 2020]

Pavlovitz, John (1 May 2020) “The White Privilege to Terrorize”. Available at https://johnpavlovitz.com/2020/05/01/the-white-privilege-to-terrorize/ [Accessed 3 May 2020]

Price, Kenneth M. (2011) ‘“Whitman, Walt, Clerk”. The Poet Was a Seer of Democracy and Bureaucracy’. National Archives Prologue Magazine, Winter 2011, Vol. 43, No. 4, available at https://www.archives.gov/publications/prologue/2011/winter/whitman.html [Accessed 3 May 2020]

The Walt Whitman House in Camden, NJ (2007), via Wikimedia Commons; Public Domain, available at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walt_Whitman#/media/File:WhitmanHouse-CamdenNJ1.jpg [Accessed 3 May 2020]

Portrait of Walt Whitman taken at Mathew Brady’s studio in Washington, D.C. between 1865 and 1867; wet plate negative; U.S. National Archives 111-B-1672; National Archives Flickr; available at https://www.flickr.com/photos/35740357@N03/4222278143/ [Accessed 3 May 2020]

Portrait of Walt Whitman taken at Mathew Brady’s studio in Washington, D.C.; wet plate negative; purchased from Brady for the U.S. National Archives in 1873, via The Walt Whitman Archive, available at https://whitmanarchive.org/multimedia/image022.html [Accessed 3 May 2020]

The Lockdown Chronicles is a series of periodical comic strips made at night (in candlelight!) adapting and reusing openly-licensed or public domain items from online digital collections. Publication and tweetage are scheduled in advance. Historical sources are adapted and updated for the current pandemic; please refer to each strip’s references on each post for further context.  Catch up with the series at https://epriego.blog/tag/the-lockdown-chronicles/.

The Lockdown Chronicles 17: Frida

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Frida hadn't thought of it.
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Frida Kahlo (6 July 1907 – 13 July 1954) was a Mexican painter known for her many portraits, self-portraits, and works inspired by the nature and artifacts of Mexico. [Wikipedia entry].

On September 17, 1925, Frida was in a serious traffic accident which resulted in multiple body fractures and internal lesions inflicted by an iron rod that had pierced her stomach and uterus. It took her three months in full-body cast to recover and though she eventually willed her way to walking again, she spent the rest of her life battling frequent relapses of extreme pain and enduring frequent hospital visits, including more than thirty operations. As a way of occupying herself while bedridden, Kahlo made her first strides in painting — then went on to become one of the most influential painters in modern art. [Popova 2013]

“I never thought of painting until 1926, when I was in bed on account of an automobile accident,” she wrote to gallery owner Julien Levy before her 1938 show. “I was bored as hell in bed . . . so I decided to do something. I stoled [sic] from my father some oil paints, and my mother ordered for me a special easel because I couldn’t sit down [the letter was written in English; she meant sit up], and I started to paint.”  [Karbo 2019]

“Viva la Vida” (1954) is known to be the last painting that Frida Kahlo did. Despite her deteriorated health, the title of this work is a tribute to life. [Google Arts & Culture]

Text based on the 1938 letter from Frida Kahlo (1907–1954) to Julien Levy (1906–1981), as cited in Karbo, Karen (2018) In Praise of Difficult Women, New York: Simon & Schuster.

Source image: Frida Kahlo, Mexico, 16 October 1932, photograph by Guillermo Kahlo (1871–1941), gelatin silver print, original via Sotheby’s Modern and Contemporary Latin American Art; version used sourced via Wikimedia Commons; image is in the public domain in its country of origin and other countries and areas where the copyright term is the author’s life plus 70 years or fewer. This comic strip CC-BY-NC-SA.

References

Karbo, Karen (2018) In Praise of Difficult Women, New York: Simon & Schuster. Excerpt available via National Geographic, 9 April  2019, at https://www.nationalgeographic.co.uk/2019/01/excerpt-inconvenient-spectacle-frida-kahlo [Accessed 1 May 2020]

Museo Frida Kahlo, Mexico City, “El universo íntimo”, available at http://www.museofridakahlo.org.mx/EluniversointimoINGLES.html [Accessed 1 May 2020]

The diary of Frida Kahlo: an intimate self-portrait, available to borrow online from the Internet Archive, available at https://archive.org/details/diaryoffridakahl00kahl/ [Accessed 1 May 2020]

Kahlo, Guillermo (16 October 1932) Frida Kahlo. Photograph, gelatin silver print, available via Wikimedia Commons: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Frida_Kahlo,_by_Guillermo_Kahlo.jpg . Original via Sotheby’s Modern and Contemporary Latin American Art, available via http://www.sothebys.com/en/auctions/ecatalogue/2014/latin-american-art-n09152/lot.148.html [Accessed 1 May 2020]

The Lockdown Chronicles is a series of periodical comic strips made at night (in candlelight!) adapting and reusing openly-licensed or public domain items from online digital collections. Publication and tweetage are scheduled in advance. Historical sources are adapted and updated for the current pandemic; please refer to each strip’s references on each post for further context.  Catch up with the series at https://epriego.blog/tag/the-lockdown-chronicles/.

The Lockdown Chronicles 16: Albert

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Albert is bored
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Albert Camus (7 November 1913 – 4 January 1960) was a French philosopher, author, and journalist. He won the Nobel Prize in Literature at the age of 44 in 1957, the second-youngest recipient in history.  [Wikipedia entry]

The Plague (French: La Peste) is a novel by Albert Camus, published in 1947, that tells the story of a plague sweeping the French Algerian city of Oran. The characters in the book, ranging from doctors to vacationers to fugitives, all help to show the effects the plague has on the population, and in so doing poses questions about the human condition.  [Wikipedia entry]

Camus finished a first draft of his novel L’Étranger (1942) alone in a hotel room in Montmartre. The former Hôtel du Poirier on the rue Ravignan sits atop one of Paris’s “buttes” or hills, whose cleaner air might have benefited the young writer, who struggled with chronic tuberculosis. [The Paris Review]

Text adapted from Camus, Albert (1913 – 1960) La Peste, Paris: Gallimard, 1947; Aarons, Ed, and Lowe, Sid (28 April 2020) “French football season will not resume but La Liga has new hope of restart”, the Guardian.; Jones, A. (2009), Football as a metaphor: learning to cope with life, manage emotional illness and maintain health through to recovery. Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, 16: 488-492. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2850.2009.01403.x

Source image: Albert Camus, Nobel prize winner, half-length portrait, seated at desk, facing left, smoking cigarette. Photograph by United Press International, via Wikimedia Commons, Public Domain. This comic strip CC-BY-NC-SA.

References

Camus, Albert (1947) La Peste, Paris: Gallimard. English version text available via the Internet Archive at https://archive.org/stream/plague02camu/plague02camu_djvu.txt (Accessed 30 April 2020)

Aarons, Ed, and Lowe, Sid (28 April 2020) “French football season will not resume but La Liga has new hope of restart”, the Guardian. Available at https://www.theguardian.com/football/2020/apr/28/french-football-season-cancelled-with-no-games-until-at-least-august-prime-minister-coronavirus (Accessed 30 April 2020)

Jones, A. (2009), Football as a metaphor: learning to cope with life, manage emotional illness and maintain health through to recovery. Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, 16: 488-492. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2850.2009.01403.x 

Kaplan, Alice (19 September 2016) “Paris from Camus’s Notebooks”, The Paris Review. Available at https://www.theparisreview.org/blog/2016/09/19/paris-camuss-notebooks/ (Accessed 30 April 2020)

Illing, Sean (16 March 2020). “This is a Time for Solidarity”. Vox. Available at https://www.vox.com/2020/3/13/21172237/coronavirus-covid-19-albert-camus-the-plague (Accessed 30 April 2020)

The Lockdown Chronicles is a series of periodical comic strips made at night (in candlelight!) adapting and reusing openly-licensed or public domain items from online digital collections. Publication and tweetage are scheduled in advance. Historical sources are adapted and updated for the current pandemic; please refer to each strip’s references on each post for further context.  Catch up with the series at https://epriego.blog/tag/the-lockdown-chronicles/.

The Lockdown Chronicles 15: Mary

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Click on the image below to read the comic strip in full size. Sources and references on this post under the comic strip below.

Mary is teaching online from home.
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Mary Somerville (née Fairfax, formerly Greig; 26 December 1780 – 29 November 1872) was a Scottish science writer and polymath. She studied mathematics and astronomy, and was nominated to be jointly the first female member of the Royal Astronomical Society at the same time as Caroline Herschel. In 1819 her husband was appointed physician to Chelsea Hospital and the family moved to Hanover Square into a government house in Chelsea. Somerville was a friend of Anne Isabella Milbanke, Baroness Wentworth, and was mathematics tutor to her daughter, Ada Lovelace. With Somerville, Ada attended the scientific gatherings where she met Charles Babbage. [Wikipedia entry]

Text adapted from Somerville, Mary [1780–1872] On the connexion of the physical sciences (1834). London: J. Murray. Wellcome Collection. Public Domain Mark; Somerville, Martha (1873). Personal Recollections, from Early Life to Old Age, of Mary Somerville: With Selections from Her Correspondence. London: J. Murray. Wellcome Collection. Public Domain Mark.

Source image: Mary Somerville [Fairfax]. Stipple engraving by W. Holl, 1858, after J. R. Swinton, 1848.Wellcome Library no. 8891i; Wellcome Collection. CC BY 4.0. This comic strip CC-BY-NC-SA.

References

Somerville, Mary (1834) On the connexion of the physical sciences. London: J. Murray. Wellcome Collection. Available at https://wellcomecollection.org/works/t8qef4k4 [Accessed 29 April 2020]

Somerville, Martha (1873) Personal Recollections, from Early Life to Old Age, of Mary Somerville: With Selections from Her Correspondence. London: J. Murray. Wellcome Collection. Available at https://wellcomecollection.org/works/we9qcvzx [Accessed 29 April 2020]

Mary Somerville [Fairfax]. Stipple engraving by W. Holl, 1858, after J. R. Swinton, 1848.Wellcome Library no. 8891i; Wellcome Collection. Available at https://wellcomecollection.org/works/uww3svfm [Accessed 29 April 2020]

 

The Lockdown Chronicles is a series of periodical comic strips made at night (in candlelight!) adapting and reusing openly-licensed or public domain items from online digital collections. Publication and tweetage are scheduled in advance. Historical sources are adapted and updated for the current pandemic; please refer to each strip’s references on each post for further context.  Catch up with the series at https://epriego.blog/tag/the-lockdown-chronicles/.

The Lockdown Chronicles 14: Virginia

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Work, even in poverty and obscurity, is worth while.”

– Virginia Woolf, A Room of One’s Own (1929)

 

Click on the image below to read the comic strip in full size. Sources and references on this post under the comic strip below.

Virginia said she would order the flowers herself.
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Adeline Virginia Woolf ( 25 January 1882 – 28 March 1941) was an English writer, considered one of the most important modernist 20th-century authors. Her novel Mrs Dalloway (1925) and her essay  A Room of One’s Own (1929) (in which she wrote the much-quoted dictum, “A woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction”) are among her best-known works. [Wikipedia Entry].

Source text: Panel 1: BBC News. 28 April 2020. “Coronavirus: Remembering 100 NHS and healthcare workers who have died”. bbc.co.uk; Woolf, Virginia (1925) Mrs. Dalloway, text via Project Gutenberg of Australia; panels 2 and 4: Woolf, Virginia (1935) [1929] A Room of One’s Own, text via Project Gutenberg of Australia; both originally published in London by Hogarth Press.

Source image: Photograph of Virginia Woolf aged 20, (January 25, 1882 – March 28, 1941) by George Charles Beresford (10 July 1864 – 21 February 1938), via Wikimedia Commons. Public Domain. This comic strip CC-BY-NC-SA.

 

References

BBC News (28 April 2020). “Coronavirus: Remembering 100 NHS and healthcare workers who have died”. Available at https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-52242856# [accessed 28 April 2020]

Woolf, Virginia (1925) Mrs. Dalloway, text via Project Gutenberg of Australia: http://gutenberg.net.au/ebooks02/0200991h.html [accessed 28 April 2020]

Woolf, Virginia (1935) [1929] A Room of One’s Own, text via Project Gutenberg of Australia: http://gutenberg.net.au/ebooks02/0200791.txt [accessed 28 April 2020]

A Room of One’s Own by Virginia Woolf. Book. Collection Items. The British Library. Available at https://www.bl.uk/collection-items/a-room-of-ones-own-by-virginia-woolf [accessed 28 April 2020]

Bradshaw, David (25 May 2016). “Mrs Dalloway and the First World War”. The British Library. Available at https://www.bl.uk/20th-century-literature/articles/mrs-dalloway-and-the-first-world-war [accessed 28 April 2020]

Bowlby, Rachel (25 May 2016). “An introduction to A Room of One’s Own” Available at https://www.bl.uk/20th-century-literature/articles/an-introduction-to-a-room-of-ones-own  [accessed 28 April 2020]

George Charles Beresford – Virginia Woolf in 1902. Wikimedia Commons. Available at https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:George_Charles_Beresford_-_Virginia_Woolf_in_1902_-_Restoration.jpg [accessed 28 April 2020]

 

P.S. Needless to say the National Portrait Gallery, London, has an extraordinary online collection of digitised Virginia Woolf portraits in their collection. However their licensing impedes derivatives (why?!) so  my only option was to use the Wikimedia Commons version.  [If you read all the way here thank you- you are my ideal reader!].

The Lockdown Chronicles is a series of periodical comic strips made at night (in candlelight!) adapting and reusing openly-licensed or public domain items from online digital collections. Publication and tweetage are scheduled in advance. Historical sources are adapted and updated for the current pandemic; please refer to each strip’s references on each post for further context.  Catch up with the series at https://epriego.blog/tag/the-lockdown-chronicles/.

The Lockdown Chronicles 13: Dr Mead

 

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Dr Mead prescribes continuing the 'quarentine'.
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Richard Mead, FRS, FRCP, (11 August 1673 – 16 February 1754) was an English physician. His work, A Short Discourse concerning Pestilential Contagion, and the Method to be used to prevent it (1720) [text] [digitised] was written in reaction to the outbreak at Marseilles. In 1703 he was elected physician to St. Thomas’ Hospital. [Wikipedia entry] [On Marseille, cfr this case study from The Edward Worth Library].

Text adapted from A Short Discourse concerning Pestilential Contagion, and the Method to be used to prevent it (1720), by Richard Mead (1673-1754). Text version via Eighteenth Century Collections Online, Text Creation Partnership.

Source images: Panel 1: Old St. Thomas’s Hospital, Southwark: the entrance courtyard. Engraving. Wellcome Library no. 39315i; Wellcome Collection, Wellcome Images, CC BY 4.0. Panels 2-4: Richard Mead. Reproduction of drawing, 1888, after W. Hogarth. Wellcome Library no. 6457iM; Wellcome Collection, Wellcome Images, CC BY 4.0 This comic strip CC-BY-NC-SA.

 

References

Mead, Richard. (1720). A short discourse concerning pestilential contagion: and the methods to be used to prevent it.  London: printed for Sam. Buckley, and Ralph Smith, 1720. Text version via Eighteenth Century Collections Online, Text Creation Partnership, available at: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/004833363.0001.000. The digitised version is available via the Wellcome Library, Wellcome Collection, at https://wellcomecollection.org/works/gg3azyks [Accessed 27 April 2020].

The Edward Worth Library, “Case Study: Plague at Marseilles 1720”. Infectious Diseases at The Edward Worth Library. Available at https://infectiousdiseases.edwardworthlibrary.ie/plague/marseilles-case-study/ [Accessed 27 April 2020].

Old St. Thomas’s Hospital, Southwark: the entrance courtyard. Engraving. Wellcome Library no. 39315i; Wellcome Collection, Wellcome Images, available at https://wellcomecollection.org/works/m7xt98x2 [Accessed 27 April 2020].

Richard Mead. Reproduction of drawing, 1888, after W. Hogarth. Wellcome Library no. 6457iM; Wellcome Collection, Wellcome Images, available at https://wellcomecollection.org/works/ufzwpn7c [Accessed 27 April 2020].

NHS England and NHS. Coronavirus. Primary Care. (2020). Accessing supplies of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE). Available at  https://www.england.nhs.uk/coronavirus/primary-care/infection-control/ppe/ [Accessed 27 April 2020].

The Lockdown Chronicles is a series of periodical comic strips made at night (in candlelight!) adapting and reusing openly-licensed or public domain items from online digital collections. Publication and tweetage are scheduled in advance. Historical sources are adapted and updated for the current pandemic; please refer to each strip’s references on each post for further context.  Catch up with the series at https://epriego.blog/tag/the-lockdown-chronicles/.

The Lockdown Chronicles 12: Giovanni

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Giovanni has stories to tell.
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Giovanni Boccaccio (6 June 1313 – 21 December 1375) was an Italian writer, poet, correspondent of Petrarch, and an important Renaissance humanist. Boccaccio wrote a number of notable works, including The Decameron and On Famous Women. Sometimes nicknamed l’Umana commedia (“the Human comedy”), The Decameron is structured as a frame story containing 100 tales told by a group of seven young women and three young men sheltering in a secluded villa just outside Florence to escape the Black Death, which was afflicting the city. Boccaccio probably conceived of The Decameron after the epidemic of 1348, and completed it by 1353. [Wikipedia entry]

Text adapted from: McKinley, Kathryn (2019) “How the rich reacted to the bubonic plague has eerie similarities to today’s pandemic”, The Conversation, April 18, 2020.

Source images: Panel 1: The plague of Florence in 1348, as described in Boccaccio’s Decameron. Etching by L. Sabatelli after himself. Wellcome Images, Wellcome Collection. CC-BY 4.0; Panels 2-4: Portrait of Giovanni Boccaccio, engraving by Raffaello Sanzio Morghen, .ca 1822. Sourced from Sumner, Charles (1875) The Best Portraits in Engraving (5th ed.), New York City: Keppel & Co. OCLC: 17144657, via Wikimedia. Public Domain. This comic strip CC-BY-NC-SA.

References

Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University (Last Updated at 4/24/2020, 2:31:34 PM BST) COVID-19 Dashboard. Available at https://coronavirus.jhu.edu/map.html [Accessed 24 April 2020]

Boccaccio, Giovanni. The Decameron (1353) (ebook Release Date: December 3, 2007). Translated by John Payne. Project Gutenberg. Available at http://www.gutenberg.org/files/23700/23700-h/23700-h.htm [Accessed 24 April 2020]

McKinley, Kathryn (2020) “How the rich reacted to the bubonic plague has eerie similarities to today’s pandemic”, The Conversation, April 18, 2020. Available at https://theconversation.com/how-the-rich-reacted-to-the-bubonic-plague-has-eerie-similarities-to-todays-pandemic-135925 [Accessed 24 April 2020]

The plague of Florence in 1348, as described in Boccaccio’s Decameron. Etching by L. Sabatelli after himself. Wellcome Images, Wellcome Collection. Available at https://wellcomecollection.org/works/awnp6vyq  [Accessed 24 April 2020]

Portrait of Giovanni Boccaccio, engraving by Raffaello Sanzio Morghen, .ca 1822. Sourced from Sumner, Charles (1875) The Best Portraits in Engraving (5th ed.), New York City: Keppel & Co. OCLC: 17144657. Wikipedia entry: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giovanni_Boccaccio   [Accessed 24 April 2020]

The Lockdown Chronicles are made at night in candlelight, and publication and tweetage are scheduled in advance, not in real time. Catch up with the series at https://epriego.blog/tag/the-lockdown-chronicles/.