Open Scholarship Award (2018) Honorable Mention to Editors of The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship

Canadian Social Knowledge Institute logo

I am delighted to share very happy news.

Dr Peter Wilkins and I have received an Open Scholarship Award 2018 Honorable Mention for our Comics Grid work.

The Open Scholarship Awards are sponsored by the Canadian Social Knowledge Institute and its partners.

From the announcement published by the Electronic Textual Cultures Lab (University of Victoria, Canada):

Open scholarship incorporates open access, open data, open education, and other related movements that have the potential to make scholarly work more efficient, more accessible, and more usable by those within and beyond the academy. By engaging with open practices for academic work, open scholarship shares that work more broadly and more publicly.

Nature of the Awards

Award recipients demonstrate exemplary open scholarship via research, projects, or initiatives. These awards are intended to acknowledge and celebrate exemplary open scholarship, nominated via an open process. In addition to the recognition of accomplishment that comes with such acknowledgement, the Canadian Social Knowledge Institute will also offer one tuition scholarship for each award recipient to the Digital Humanities Summer Institute (DHSI; dhsi.org).

The Canadian Social Knowledge Institute would like to thank Clare Apavoo (Canadian Research Knowledge Network), Alyssa Arbuckle (ETCL, U Victoria), Jon Bath (U Saskatchewan), Jonathan Bengtson (U Victoria), Rachel Hendry (Western Sydney U), Tanja Niemann (Érudit), Peter Severinson (Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences), Ray Siemens (U Victoria), and Dan Sondheim (ETCL, U Victoria) for their involvement in the 2018 awards.

About the Canadian Social Knowledge Institute
The Canadian Social Knowledge Institute (C-SKI) actively engages issues related to networked open social scholarship: creating and disseminating research and research technologies in ways that are accessible and significant to a broad audience that includes specialists and active non-specialists. Representing, coordinating, and supporting the work of the Implementing New Knowledge Environments (INKE) Partnership, C-SKI activities include awareness raising, knowledge mobilization, training, public engagement, scholarly communication, and pertinent research and development on local, national, and international levels. Originated in 2015, C-SKI is located in the Electronic Textual Cultures Lab in the U Victoria Digital Scholarship Commons.

C-SKI’s partners, through INKE, include: Advanced Research Consortium (ARC), Canadian Association of Learned Journals (CALJ), Canadian Association of Research Libraries (CARL), Canadian Institute for Studies in Publishing (CISP), Canadian Research Knowledge Network (CRKN), Compute Canada, Canadian Writing Research Collaboratory (CWRC), Canadiana, Digital Humanities Research Group (DHRG; Western Sydney U), Digital Humanities Summer Institute (DHSI), Electronic Textual Cultures Lab (ETCL), Edith Cowan U, Érudit, Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences, Iter: Gateway to the Renaissance, J.E. Halliwell Associates, Public Knowledge Project (PKP), Simon Fraser U Library, Society for the History of Authorship, Reading and Publishing (SHARP), Scholarly and Research Communication (SRC), U Victoria Libraries, and Voyant Tools, among others.

 

Priego and Wilkins’ Comics Grid [https://www.comicsgrid.com/] is a pioneering open access, open peer review academic journal dedicated to comics scholarship, promoting the area within academia and the general public via contributions that present specialised knowledge in an accessible language, publishing content licensed with a Creative Commons Attribution license. As a publishing platform The Comics Grid encourages digital research, public engagement and collaboration. By integrating with ORCID, and requesting that supplementary data is deposited in open access repositories, The Comics Grid introduces a new generation of scholars to open, reproducible research. It uses Ubiquity Press and the Open Library of Humanities as their publishers; working closely with their web developer and designer, Andy Byers, the journal employs Open Journal Systems with an overlay skin that offers an accessible (and dyslexia friendly) reading mode and a visual UI at both front- and back-end that improves the basic OJS and turns it into a user-friendlier platform that supports general and specialised readers as much as academic authors, editors and reviewers.

Read the full announcement at http://etcl.uvic.ca/?p=2086

Needless to say, this reconginition means a lot to us.

We would like to thank the colleagues who kindly nominated us, as well as everyone involved in the awards.

We would also like to congratulate all the winners and fellow honorable mentions, who have been for some time now an inspiration for our own work.

We would also like to give a sincere thank you to every single colleague who is or has been involved with The Comics Grid— the effort is collective and collaborative and everyone’s contribution remains crucial for the project. We share this honorable mention with you.

A special shout-out to everyone at Ubiquity Press and the Open Library of Humanities for believing in us. Thank you.

Last but not least an all-encompassing thank you to our partners and families for their love, encouragement, and support.

Onwards!

Interviewed by Abi Roper re: Parables of Care

Dr Abi Roper is a Research Fellow at City, University of London. She is a speech and language therapist and researcher passionate about technology use within atypical speech & language populations.

Recently Abi asked me some questions about working on Parables of Care for the project’s blog. I have copied and pasted the original post below.


Parables of Care: A Q&A with Ernesto Priego

by Abi Roper

This post was originally published at the Parables of Care blog on 26 October 2017 at https://blogs.city.ac.uk/parablesofcare/2017/10/26/parables-of-care-a-qa-with-ernesto-priego/. If at some point in the future links to embedded media appear broken it is because the source post may have been changed location or is undergoing maintenance.

 

Dr Ernesto Priego
Dr Ernesto Priego, City, University of London

 

Ernesto Priego is a lecturer at the Centre for Human-Computer Interaction Design at City, University of London and the Editor of The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship.

Ernesto worked in partnership with Dr Simon Grennan of the University of Chester, Dr Peter Wilkins of Douglas College, Vancouver, Canada, an NHS Trust, and colleages from HCID, leading the team to produce Parables of Care.

I asked Ernesto some questions about working on Parables of Care.

 

As a speech and language therapist researcher, I work with people who have aphasia and may have difficulty in reading large amounts of written text. People with dementia can experience similar challenges. What do you think the comics format offers that other mediums might not?

Ernesto Priego: My view is that comics are a unique medium because they often rely on a unique, complementary combination of writing, still graphic images and other components of visual communication. There are, of course, comics that are very wordy—they employ a lot (and I mean a lot) of written text. And there are, of course, comics that include almost no text at all (titles, indicia, series names are also written text). Unlike animation, video, TV or cinema, most comics, particularly printed ones, allow users / readers to linger on the comics page. Comics are therefore, in their own way, a very ‘mindful’ medium, as they often rely on a type of hyper awareness of concrete and abstract constraints, of context.

In most comics, time passes through different vehicles so to speak: through the time of the written text, the time represented through layout (panel size and arrangement and the placement of characters, backgrounds, props, narrative components), the time represented through panels in sequence and the gap between them, and the time it takes each reader to read or navigate the comic itself. So comics are a very complex medium indeed, but at the same time they give users a freedom to linger and to interpret information in a way that synchronic media such as music, video, TV or film do not allow them to.

Rather than just a question of comics being able to present ideas without the need for many words, in this case we think of comics as a medium that can actually evoke the kind of de-structured and re-structured experience of time that is akin to dementia but also to illness, ageing and caring in general (Paco Roca’s Wrinkles does this very well).

 Illustration from Wrinkles, a graphic novel by Paco Roca (© Knockabout Comics, 2015) Illustration from Wrinkles, a graphic novel by Paco Roca (© Knockabout Comics, 2015)
Illustration from Wrinkles, a graphic novel by Paco Roca. © Knockabout Comics, 2015

In many cases, people with dementia, as well as their carers, experience a time which is ‘out of joint’ (Hamlet, that tragic hero…). The fragmentary yet sequential structure of the comics in Parables of Care seeks to communicate and empathise with this experience, and in this way it attempts to share a way of experiencing the world.

I’m more familiar with comics being used to tell stories of superheroes. How are Care’N’Share stories similar and/or different to these more traditional comics narratives?

EP: That’s a very good question. For many people the term ‘comics’ means ‘superheroes’. Comics are much more than superheroes but in the case of the Care’N’Share stories the analogy achieves the status of poetic justice. Peter said in the previous Q&A that the Care’N’Share caregiver-storytellers are poets. This is true. Your question makes me think that they are similar to Romantic poets, and in this sense to heroes. Caregiving is heroic because it is a journey, and the hero’s journey is both motivated and defined by a sense of ethics, a thirst for justice and order, and fate or destiny. I also think people with dementia are poets: they see the world in a way that forces the carer and other people to realign their way of seeing things. Like the poet, they often see things that others don’t. The carer is a poet-hero because they need to learn to interpret that poetry and engage in creative endeavour themselves.

The best superhero comics, in my mind, are not about invincible heroes but about vulnerable folk that are somewhat different: their ‘superpowers’ lie in their difference and in their ability to find solutions to problems for the betterment of their communities. (Think of Peter Parker, for example). There is a lot of doubt, anxiety and pain in the hero’s journey.

Peter Parker takes care of his aunt May after she suffers a heart attack. In Stan Lee (w), Steve Ditko (p), Sam Rosen (l), The Amazing Spider-Man, Vol 1, No. 17, October 1964.
Peter Parker cares for his aunt May after she suffers a heart attack. In Stan Lee (writer), Steve Ditko (artist), Sam Rosen (letterer), The Amazing Spider-Man, Vol 1, No. 17, October 1964. © Marvel Comics
 John Keats, by Joseph Severn, 1821-1823 - NPG 58 - © National Portrait Gallery, London
John Keats, by Joseph Severn, 1821-1823 – NPG 58 – © National Portrait Gallery, London

 

The caregiver-storytellers of Care’N’Share however do not see themselves as heroes, but what they do is heroic, it requires a sacrifice and a determination that is only possible when our deepest fears are defeated and our inner super powers come to the fore. I have the uttermost respect for dementia carers/caregivers. The stories they share are lessons to us all on our duty to our fellow human beings on how to empathise with what is often completely incomprehensible and find solutions that are respectful, loving and fair.

So it’s important to say that to me the beauty of ‘Graphic Medicine’ is that it’s not about idealisation or about fitting into generic narrative structures and archetypes. It’s about the personal journey, the vulnerabilities that make us human, and discovering the ways in which we can overcome serious challenges.

 

 

http://carenshare.city.ac.uk/

 

What have you learnt about dementia through your experience in creating Parables of Care?

EP: I am still learning a lot. The statistics alone provide sufficient evidence that dementia is one of the key public health and social challenges of today, not just in the UK but around the world. Working in this project required having an open mind about what we could achieve and be willing to accept that our contribution would be relativelly small but potentially impactful on some level.

To come back to my previous answer I think all of us working in the project learnt that a lot is achievable in terms of health care of incurable conditions if there is tolerance, empathy, creativity and imagination. In general working in adapting the stories forced us to attempt walking in the carers’ shoes. Susan Sontag wrote a beautiful book discussing the im-possibility of experiencing the pain of others through photography. I hope Parables of Care can contribute to share the experience of dementia care in a respectful and sensitive way.

Where else might comics be applied in healthcare? Where do you want to go next?

EP: Ah, that is the question! Short answer: almost everywhere. We believe that comics can be brilliant health information resources. And I think that Health Informatics and Graphic Medicine are a match made in heaven. We are already working on that next step. I am definitely interested in developing more work that explicitly connects the dots between graphic narrative and User-Centred Design and Interaction Design. I won’t say more for the time being. Watch this space!

Dr Abi Roper is a Research Fellow at City, University of London. She is a speech and language therapist and researcher passionate about technology use within atypical speech & language populations.

Parables of Care can be downloaded as a PDF file, under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License, from City Research Online: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/18245/.

If you live in the UK you can request printed copies at no cost here.

This post was originally published at the Parables of Care blog on 26 October 2017 at https://blogs.city.ac.uk/parablesofcare/2017/10/26/parables-of-care-a-qa-with-ernesto-priego/. If at some point in the future links to embedded media appear broken it is because the source post may have been changed location or is undergoing maintenance.

The impacts of “Impact” [video, slides, charts, dataset] #uksglive

Update: Research Information published an article based on my UKSG presentation below. Read it here.

The UKSG 2014 Annual Conference and Exhibition took place from 14-16 April at the Harrogate International Centre, Harrogate, United Kingdom.

Originally, UKSG stood for the United Kingdom Serials Group. Now that their geographic appeal has grown beyond the UK, and the scope has broadened to include e-books, e-learning and other e-resources as well as serials and e-journals, UKSG have stopped expanding the acronym.

I was honoured to participate in the morning plenary on Tuesday 15 April 2014 9:30-10:30 AM BST. My title was “The Impacts of ‘Impact’: challenges and opportunities of ‘multichannel’ academic work”. You can now see it on UKSG’s YouTube channel… [embedded below].

I also shared the slides on figshare as

Thanks to Penny Andrews for this photo she tweeted…

The conference had a lively backchannel under the #uksglive hashtag. I archived the tweets using Martin Hawksey’s Twitter Archiving Google Spreadsheet (TAGS).

Some insights from the conference’s backchannel:

Number of tweets in archive started 09/04/2014 17:14:33 BST; last tweet in archive 16/04/2014 18:24:45 BST:

Archive contains 4293 tweets. Archive started 09/04/2014 17:14:33 BST; last tweet in archive 16/04/2014 18:24:45 BST
Archive contains 4293 tweets. Archive started 09/04/2014 17:14:33 BST; last tweet in archive 16/04/2014 18:24:45 BST

Twitter Activity during the 3 days of the conference:

#uksglive Twitter Activity during the 3 days of the conference, 14-16 April 2014
#uksglive Twitter Activity during the 3 days of the conference, 14-16 April 2014

Top tweeters, 9-16 April 2014:

#uksglive top tweeters, 9-16 April 2014
#uksglive top tweeters, 9-16 April 2014

I have shared the source data on figshare as a CSV file containing tweets tagged with #uksglive from Friday April 11 12-00-51 +0000 2014 to Wednesday April 16 17:24:45 +0000 2014. The dates in the CSV file are GMT (not BST).

The original archive contained tweets dating back to 9 April 2014 but for relevance this dataset concentrates on the main activity immediately before, during and a few hours after the actual conference. Some of the data has been cleaned but duplications and even one or two spam tweets might have remained. The data is shared as is.

Please note there was also some Twitter activity around the conference using the hashtags #uksg and #uksg14, but those tweets were not included in this collection.

If you find this data useful and/or use it for your research, please kindly cite this file as indicated above and share it openly with others. Please feel free to get in touch via Twitter @ernestopriego or by sending me an email via my contact page on this blog.

Research Information published an article based on my UKSG presentation. Read it here.

#LibPub Session 10: Libraries, Publishing: The Future?

Image from ‘An Introduction to the Study of Metallurgy, etc’, 000144847 via the Mechanical Curator
Image from ‘An Introduction to the Study of Metallurgy, etc’, 000144847 via the Mechanical Curator

Today we’ll have our last taught session of the term. Time flies when you are having fun…

For the past ten weeks we’ve been unveiling pieces of the complex, large jigsaw puzzle of the libraries and publishing landscape. “Libraries and publishing”, “library publishing” and “libraries as publishers” are three distinct inter-connected terms that refer to distinct issues and different levels of granularity. It can be argued that each of them create different scenarios, like neighbour countries in a larger map, often the borders blurring yet still present. We must also remember that the “landscape” we can see is possible by a series of layers we cannot always see (they might be below us… or above), and that the map is not the territory.

Through a series of lectures from different professional voices and points of view, the aim has to been to facilitate an understanding of the ways in which publishing (and this means current understandings of what the term means) and to explore the impact that this will have on libraries, other information providers, and their users.

We have discussed how the technical (this includes “technological”) economic, social and political factors defining the transformations in publishing, and consequently in librarianship. The module has had a strong emphasis on scholarly publishing, but we also covered trade publishing and the industry as a whole. As technologies diversify the forms in which information is recorded and disseminated, the quantity, quality, form and content of the recorded information that libraries acquire, collect, archive, preserve and make available has also changed, and this includes the methods for performing these functions. These discourses, technologies and methodologies have not evolved out of a vacuum, but as integral/integrated pieces of the social, cultural, economic and political landscape.

Today we’ll have a guest lecture by Alastair Horne (@pressfuturist); one of the best-known UK specialists spearheading online innovation and social media engagement  in UK publishing. He will discuss with us his vision of the role that social media currently plays in the publishing landscape. Though we have covered and discussed social media throughout the module, Alastair’s presentation will give us a chance to zoom in and grasp the key issues.

The intention of this last session is also to discuss the key issues we covered throughout the course and to brainstorm all together as a rehearsal in preparation of the coursework submission.

As usual, this #LibPub #citylis post was originally published on my City University London blog.

#LibPub Session 9: Researcher-led Open Access Publishing & Reference Management

Image from ‘Illustrated Battles of the Nineteenth Century. [By Archibald Forbes, Major Arthur Griffiths, and others.]’, 001266335. Via the Mechanical Curator, British Library
Image from ‘Illustrated Battles of the Nineteenth Century. [By Archibald Forbes, Major Arthur Griffiths, and others.]’, 001266335. Via the Mechanical Curator, British Library

Session 9 is taking place today. As every week our lecture will be divided in two segments.

The first one will cover researcher-led open access publishing, and the second one will concentrate on tools for online reference management. I see open access publishing and online reference software, including altmetrics or alternative metrics, as important components of the scholarly publishing landscape and research cycle, working closely together.

Paywalls create friction as they require scholars from different institutions (and those not working at  academic institutions) to subscribe to the same journals at the same time in order to successfully share publications. A reference without access to an output’s full text and/or resources is like an empty signifier, a roadsign leading to a wall. For online reference managers to fulfill their function fully, openness is required, not only for successful sharing amongst individuals but for successful metadata sharing. This often means going beyond the PDF…

So for the first segment of today’s session we will be honoured to have a guest lecture from Brian Hole, a researcher and publisher working within the humanities and information science, with a focus on ethics and inclusive systems.

He is the founder of a researcher-focused publishing company called Ubiquity Press, which specialises in open access academic journals and open data. He will talk to us about how they work on different ways to break down barriers to publishing, and the several interesting projects they have underway.

Ubiquity Press in on Twitter @ubiquitypress.  Brian is on Twitter @brian_hole.

In the second section of the lecture we’ll take a closer look at online reference managers, and why they matter for publishers, libraries and the research process, including funding and research assessment. As we are on the days in which you are getting ready to start working on final coursework and dissertations, I am hoping greater awareness of what you can achieve with these tools will be helpful. Though we will mention software like EndNote and RefWorks, we will be focusing on Zotero and Mendeley, and particularly the latter, which is currently my personal favourite.*

*I know this is controversial as Mendeley was bought by Elsevier. That didn’t make me happy either. I use Zotero too, as I know I’ll want to stop using Mendeley eventually. However, so far Mendeley works very smoothly online and I really like that.

#LibPub Session 6: Libraries and Archives Disrupting Publishing?

Winchell, Alexander. Image from ‘Preadamites; or a demonstration of the existence of men before Adam, etc’, British Library 003949013. Via The Mechanical Curator. Public Domain.
Winchell, Alexander. Image from ‘Preadamites; or a demonstration of the existence of men before Adam, etc’, British Library 003949013. Via The Mechanical Curator. Public Domain.

Today we’re back at our Libraries and Publishing module at #citylis. Last week there was no lecture due to Reading Week. I hope students had a chance to catch up with the readings on Moodle!

[On Wednesday evening I came back to London from Nairobi. I had the privilege of participating in the Discoverability of African Scholarship Online workshop that took place  on 10-11 March 2014. It was organised by the OpenUCT Initiative and the Carnegie Corporation of New York. I uploaded a fileset with relevant workshop materials to figshare, here, in case anyone is interested (if you are into the present and future of librarianship, you should!).]

Today we will be discussing how library collections and archives interrogate (disrupt?) previous and current conceptions of “publishing”. We’ll do this through two  presentations by two very special guest speakers:

  • Dr James Baker, Digital Curator, British Library
  • Dr Geoff Browell, Senior Archives Services Manager, Library Services, King’s College London

By hearing about their two different professional experiences in the present day, we will be hoping to stimulate a discussion about how future libraries and future publications will co-exist.

Some links to check out:

Don’t forget you can share resources and engage with us with the #LibPub and #citylis hashtags on Twitter.

I can’t wait. See you later!

 

En mi Día de HD: Café Científico: Acceso Abierto en la Investigación

Reblogueado de http://dhd2013.filos.unam.mx/ernestopriego/2013/06/09/cafe-cientifico-acceso-abierto-en-la-investigacion/

Open Access en la Investigación, Bar Novo's, Mexico DF 11 de Junio 2013, 7pm
Open Access en la Investigación, Bar Novo’s, Mexico DF 11 de Junio 2013, 7pm

Me dará mucho participar en esta sesión organizada por el “Centro de Investigaciones Medianamente Serias” [página de Facebook aquí] sobre acceso abierto en la investigación. Será un placer poder conversar con figuras prominentes del desarrollo del acceso abierto en México.

La sesión será en el Bar Novo’s, Madrid 13 entre Centenario y Aldama, Col. Del Carmen Coyoacán, México DF., 19:00 hrs.

¡Vengan a tomarse una cerveza!

Conferencia magistral: El académico digital: acceso abierto, licencias y derechos de autor

June 2014 Update: Slides now also on figshare:

Priego, Ernesto (2014): [2013] El académico digital: acceso abierto, licencias y derechos de autor (Conferencia magistral, Biblioteca Nacional, UNAM, México, 11 de Junio de 2013). figshare.
http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.1045361

[Slides on Slideshare].

[I have also announced this at my my Día de las Humanidades Digitales 2013 blog].

[También publiqué este anuncio en mi blog del Día de las Humanidades Digitales 2013].

[También publiqué esto en mi blog en / I also posted this at my HASTAC /blog].

I am honoured to announce I am giving a lecture at my alma mater on open access, Creative Commons licenses and copyright. It will take place at 12 PM on Tuesday 11 June 2013, at the National Library, Institute of Library Studies, National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM).

Es un honor para mí anunciar que daré una conferencia magistral en mi alma mater sobre acceso abierto, licencias de Creative Commons y derechos de autor. Tendrá lugar a las doce del día martes 11 de junio de 2013, en la Biblioteca/Hemeretoca Nacional, Instituto de Investigaciones Bibliográficas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México.

El académico digital: acceso abierto, licencias abiertas y derechos de autor, póster, Ernesto Priego, UNAM 11 de junio de 2013

¡Espero ver a algunos de ustedes por allá!

At Guardian Higher Ed: ‘Altmetrics’: quality of engagement matters as much as retweets

Guardian Higher Education banner

Today’s been a busy day; today the Guardian Higher Education Network published a piece by me on qualitative sharing, here.

It’s not meant to be a negative critique of altmetrics or statistical cybermetrics (both projects/methodologies I admire), but a call to combine the quantitative and the qualitative when it comes to assessing the correlations between online metrics and the impact of academic outputs.

At The Arts Pages: Comics Scholarship in the Digital Age

The Arts Pages banner

The Arts Pages is a muti-author blog whose aim is “to foster dialogue across the disciplines on research into the arts and to encourage a diverse and interesting collection of blogs and essays that showcase a variety of perspectives, research areas, and fields.”

My contribution, “Comics Scholarship in the Digital Age: Towards Media-specific Research”, was published today and can be read here.

The Arts Pages is coordinated by Kieran Fenby-Hulse, a research officer at the University of Brighton.