The Power of Sharing in English, Spanish and French

Symbola Comics Logo

 

I am happy to announce that today we published ‘The Power of Sharing‘, a comic resulting from the collaboration between figshare, Symbola Comics, and LaGrúa Estudio (1).

You can view the comic, download it, cite it, comment and share it from

https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.5993392

Concept and story by Francisco De La Mora & Ernesto Priego

Art by Cristina Durán La Grúa Estudio

Design by Daniela Rocha

The comic is also available in Spanish (2):

https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.6061460

and French (3):

https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.6204755

The whole set, including the whole InDesign package, are available in a figshare collection (4) at:

https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.c.4052732

As you know I strongly believe that sustainable open access to research and open research data can break barriers of all types and empower the researchers of the future.

I personally hope we’ve been able to share an optimisitc message of empowerment and encouragement.

There’s too many reasons to get dispirited and to just get with the programme. We can change the future by the actions we take in the present- sharing and collaboration are inherently optimistic expressions of trust.

I have faith that what we do today, no matter how apparently insignificant, will have an effect on others tomorrow.

References

  1. de la Mora, F., Priego, E., Durán, C., Rocha, D., and Hardeman, M., 2018. The Power of Sharing. Available from: https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.5993392
  2. de la Mora, F., Priego, E., Durán, C., Rocha, D., and Hardeman, M., 2018. El Poder de Compartir. Available from: https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.6061460
  3. de la Mora, F., Priego, E., Durán, C., Rocha, D., and Hardeman, M., 2018. Le Pouvoir de Partager. Available from: https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.6204755
  4. de la Mora, F., Priego, E., Durán, C., Rocha, D., and Hardeman, M., 2018. The Power of Sharing. Available from: https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.c.4052732

A #HEFCEmetrics Twitter Archive (Friday 16 January 2015, Warwick)

HEFCE logo

The HEFCE metrics workshop: metrics and the assessment of research quality and impact in the arts and humanities took place on Friday 16 January 2015, 1030 to 1630 GMT at the Scarman Conference Centre, University of Warwick, UK.

I have uploaded a dataset of 821 Tweets tagged with #HEFCEmetrics (case not sensitive):

Priego, Ernesto (2015): A #HEFCEmetrics Twitter Archive (Friday 16 January 2015, Warwick). figshare.
http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.1293612

TheTweets in the dataset were publicly published and tagged with #HEFCEmetrics between 16/01/2015 00:35:08 GMT and 16/01/2015 23:19:33 GMT. The collection period corresponds to the day the workshop took place in real time.

The Tweets contained in the file were collected using Martin Hawksey’s TAGS 6.0. The file contains 2 sheets.

Only users with at least 2 followers were included in the archive. Retweets have been included. An initial automatic deduplication was performed but data might require further deduplication.

Please note the data in this file is likely to require further refining and even deduplication. The data is shared as is. The contents of each Tweet are responsibility of the original authors. This dataset is shared to encourage open research into scholarly activity on Twitter. If you use or refer to this data in any way please cite and link back using the citation information above.

For the #HEFCEmetrics Twitter archive corresponding to the one-day workshop hosted by the University of Sussex on Tuesday 7 October 2014, please go to

Priego, Ernesto (2014): A #HEFCEmetrics Twitter Archive. figshare.
http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.1196029

You might also be interested in

Priego, Ernesto (2014): The Twelve Days of REF- A #REF2014 Archive. figshare.
http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.1275949

#MLA15 Twitter Archive, 8-11 January 2015

130th MLA Annual Convention Vancouver, 8–11 January 2015

#MLA15 is the hashtag which corresponded to the 2015 Modern Language Association Annual Convention. The Convention was held in Vancouver from Thursday 8 to Sunday 11 January 2015.

We have uploaded a dataset as a .xlsx file including data from Tweets publicly published with #mla15:

Priego, Ernesto; Zarate, Chris (2015): #MLA15 Twitter Archive, 8-11 January 2015. figshare.
http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.1293600

The dataset includes Tweets posted during the actual convention with #mla15: the set starts with a Tweet from Thursday 08/01/2015 00:02:53 Pacific Time and ends with a Tweet from Sunday 11/01/2015 23:59:58 Pacific Time.

The total number of Tweets in this dataset sums 23,609 Tweets. Only Tweets from users with at least two followers were collected.

A combination of Twitter Archiving Google Spreadsheets (Martin Hawksey’s TAGS 6.0; available at https://tags.hawksey.info/ ) was used to harvest this collection. OpenRefine (http://openrefine.org/) was used for deduplicating the data.

Please note the data in the file is likely to require further refining and even deduplication. The data is shared as is. The dataset is shared to encourage open research into scholarly activity on Twitter. If you use or refer to this data in any way please cite and link back using the citation information above.

For the #MLA14 datasets, please go to
Priego, Ernesto; Zarate, Chris (2014): #MLA14 Twitter Archive, 9-12 January 2014. figshare.
http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.924801

Internet Librarian International ’14. A #ili2014 Twitter Archive

Internet Librarian 2014 logo

I have uploaded file contains a dataset of ∼ 2958 Tweets tagged with #ili2014 (case not sensitive). These Tweets were published publicly and tagged with #ili2014 between 13/10/2014 09:49 and 26/10/2014 17:36 GMT.
Priego, Ernesto (2014): Internet Librarian International ’14. A #ili2014 Twitter Archive. figshare.
http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.1217605

Internet Librarian International 2014 (#ili2014) took place between 20 and 22 October 2014 in the Olympia Centre, London, UK.

The Tweets contained in the file were collected using Martin Hawksey’s TAGS 6.0. This file contains 3 sheets.

Only users with at least 2 followers were included in the archive. Retweets have been included. An initial automatic deduplication was performed but data might require further deduplication.

Please note that both research and experience show that the Twitter search API isn’t 100% reliable. Large tweet volumes affect the search collection process. The API might “over-represent the more central users”, not offering “an accurate picture of peripheral activity” (Gonzalez-Bailon, Sandra, et al. 2012). It is not guaranteed this file contains each and every Tweet tagged with #ili2014 during the indicated period, and is shared for comparative and indicative educational and research purposes only.

Please note the data in the file is likely to require further refining and even deduplication. The data is shared as is. The contents of each Tweet are responsibility of the original authors. This dataset is shared to encourage open research into scholarly activity on Twitter.

If you use or refer to this data in any way please cite and link back using the citation information above.

A #HEFCEmetrics Twitter Archive

#hefcemetrics top tweeters

I have uploaded a new dataset to figshare:
Priego, Ernesto (2014): A #HEFCEmetrics Twitter Archive. figshare.
http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.1196029

“In metrics we trust? Prospects & pitfalls of new research metrics” was a one-day workshop hosted by the University of Sussex, as part of the Independent Review of the Role of Metrics in Research Assessment. It took place on Tuesday 7 October 2014 at the Terrace Room, Conference Centre, Bramber House, University of Sussex, UK.

The file contains a dataset of 1178 Tweets tagged with #HEFCEmetrics (case not sensitive). These Tweets were published publicly and tagged with #HEFCEmetrics between 02/10/2014 10:18 and 08/10/2014 00:27 GMT.

The Tweets contained in the file were collected using Martin Hawksey’s TAGS 6.0. The file contains 3 sheets.

Please note the data in this file is likely to require further refining and even deduplication. The data is shared as is. The contents of each Tweet are responsibility of the original authors. This dataset is shared to encourage open research into scholarly activity on Twitter.

For more information refer to the upload itself.

If you use or refer to this data in any way please cite and link back using the citation information above.

Ebola: Publisher, Access and License Types of the 100 Most Mentioned Papers

I made a quick alluvial diagram showing the publisher, access and license types of the top 100 papers in our dataset.

Alluvial Diagram Showing the Publishers of the Top 100 Ebola Papers According to Altmetric as of Wed Aug 06 2014 16:44:28 GMT+0000 (UTC)  By License and Access Type

Source:
Priego, Ernesto; Lewandowski, Tomasz; Atenas, Javiera; Andrés Delgado; Isabel Galina; Levin, John; Murtagh, John; Brun, Laurent; Whitton, Merinne; Pablo de Castro; Sarah Molloy; Petersen, Sigmund; Gutierrez, Silvia (2014): Articles with Ebola mentioned online anytime as tracked by Altmetric, with crowdsourced type of access and license. figshare.
http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.1137162

Retrieved 10:22, Aug 15, 2014 (GMT)

Ebola: Access and Licenses of 497 Papers Crowdsourced in 7 Days

From  (2014): Articles with Ebola mentioned online anytime as tracked by Altmetric, with crowdsourced type of access and license. figshare. http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.1137162

Yesterday I shared a spreadsheet containing references to 497 papers on Ebola including the access and license type of each paper. The access and license types of each paper were crowdsourced. Fourteen volunteers participated in completing the dataset.

On Wednesday 6 August 2014 I shared a dataset on a Google spreadsheet of references to 497 papers on Ebola exported from an Altmetric Explorer report (see my previous post here).

One of the intentions of sharing the dataset, apart from sharing a file containing links to 497 scientific articles on Ebola mentioned online, was to crowdsource the access and license type of each paper. I promoted the file and the task amongst my followers on Twitter.

The task was to manually click on each link and personally verify which papers were open access, which were paywalled, which were ‘free to read’, etc., and to verify under which licenses they were published. We also added another column for ‘Publisher’. Contributors were asked to add their names and Twitter usernames on a column next to the Access, License and Publisher rows they had completed.

By Wednesday 13 August 2014, the whole dataset was complete (only a few Publisher rows remained to be completed, which I did). I closed the shared Google spreadsheet for editing and did a little bit of manual data refining; and verified some of the access and licenses types. I then downloaded it and did a bit more refining on Excel; and edited the spreadsheet so it contained a documentation ReadMe sheet and two extra sheets; one sheet with only the Open Access (in this case we included SA, ND and NC Creative Commons Licenses; though as we know fully-fledged Open Access requires CC-BY licenses) and another one with only the CC-BY entries for easier location of the open papers. I shared it last night on figshare, including everyone who helped crowdsource as co-authors of the spreadsheet:

Priego, Ernesto; Lewandowski, Tomasz; Atenas, Javiera; Andrés Delgado; Isabel Galina; Levin, John; Murtagh, John; Brun, Laurent; Whitton, Merinne; Pablo de Castro; Sarah Molloy; Petersen, Sigmund; Gutierrez, Silvia (2014): Articles with Ebola mentioned online anytime as tracked by Altmetric, with crowdsourced type of access and license. figshare.
http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.1137162
Retrieved 07:39, Aug 14, 2014 (GMT)

Last night I did a quick chart about the number of papers per type of access. It was late so it may contain errors. One of the reasons why the spreadsheet has been shared openly is so that others can do their own analyses and contrast any information about it.

Number of Ebola Papers in Dataset Per Access Type chart CC-BY Ernesto Priego
Number of Ebola Papers in Dataset Per Access Type. Click to enlarge.

 

Access type Number of papers in dataset per access type
All Open Access (includes NC; 95 CC-BY) 133
Paywalled 138
Free to Read but not OA (All Rights Reserved research papers) 211
“Advance Access” (Free to read but not OA) 1
News Items (Free to Read but not OA) 6
DOIs not found or unresolved 4

[Please note total is not 497 in the charts above as some license/access types were either not present or unclear; for example there’s cases of papers labeled as “Open Access” but the license for that article was absent of hard to find. In any case this chart needs to be revised and editorial decisions need to be taken about what will count as what. The charts are shared in the knowledge errors can still remain].

Depending on your interests, there is a series of different analyses that could be done from the data. I’ll be working on that; but since we have shared the dataset openly, why not see what you can do with it? (Don’t forget to cite the dataset!)

Two #teachDH Outputs

View of Lewes Castle, 2014-05-07 11.39.09 BST photo by Ernesto Priego CC-BY
View of Lewes Castle, 2014-05-07 11.39.09 BST

We were lucky enough to be one of the participants in the Higher Education Academy’s Digital Humanities Summit, an invitation-only series of workshops that took place last week on Wednesday 7 and Thursday 8 May 2014 in the lovely town of Lewes, UK. The summit had the #teachDH tag on Twitter.

From the summit itself I posted some (not very good) photos I took with my mobile phone of the ideas jotted down by participants during the “Narrowing the Focus” session on 8 May 2014. They are on this blog here and you can click on the photos to enlarge them and hopefully read the words. I think the ideas there represent some kind of collective stream of consciousness on our part as participants interested in the digital humanities; many pointed out the differences between say “Dream” and “Solve”… it might also show differences (and similarities) in how “DH” is conceptualised in the UK in comparison to other countries.

Last week I also uploaded two summit outputs to figshare. The first is a quick slide show our group created and presented at the summit and the second is a #teachDH Twitter archive.  Citations below.

Deswarte, Richard; Mahoney, Simon; Priego, Ernesto; Tiedau, Urlich (2014): DH-DA The Digital Humanities Devil’s Advocate figshare. http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.1019845

Priego, Ernesto (2014): #teachDH Digital Humanities Summit Tweets Archive Monday 28 April to Friday 09 May 09 2014. figshare. http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.1021684

The uploads also include links to other summit outputs published online by other participants.

We could of course have left a private event private, with only the hand-picked participants benefiting from the proceedings. But that’s not how we do things today, is it? Anyway, I really hope these materials are of some interest to some of you.

Sharing Research: My Latest Uploads to Figshare

Image via Figshare
Figshare is a repository where users can make all of their research outputs available in a citable, shareable and discoverable manner.
It allows users to upload any file format to be made visualisable in the browser so that figures, datasets, media, papers, posters, presentations and filesets can be disseminated in a way that the current scholarly publishing model does not allow.
I have listed below my most recent uploads.

The Triple A: Africa, Access, Altmetrics

Time flies and I can’t contain my excitement that I will be participating in the Discoverability of African Scholarship Online. Practical strategies and collaborative approaches workshop in Nairboi, Kenya, organised by the Open UCT Initiative. For me there’s three very important A’s in scholarly communications: Africa, Access and Altmetrics.

I have been doing some digging, refining and visualising this week, and today I shared two first rough drafts of a couple of alluvial charts I made visualising a dataset of the 25 highest scoring peer-reviewed articles with the term “Africa” in the title (within the timeframe of one year). To collect the articles data I used the Altmetric Explorer. The data corresponds to a report I exported on the 19th of February 2014.

The Altmetric score is a quantative measure of the quality and quantity of attention that a scholarly article has received. It takes into account three main factors:

  1. Volume. The score for an article rises as more people mention it. The Explorer only counts one mention from each person per source, so if someone tweet about the same paper more than once Altmetric will ignore everything but the first.
  2. Sources. Each category of mention contributes a different base amount to the final score. For instance, a newspaper article contributes more than a blog post which contributes more than a tweet.  Altmetric looks at how often the author of each mention talks about scholarly articles, whether or not there’s any bias towards a particular journal or publisher and at who their audience is.
  3. Authors.  For example, a scholar sharing a link with other scholars counts for far more than a journal account pushing the same link out automatically.

The focus of my study, however, is not necessarily the Altmetric score itself. One of my goals is to try to discover patterns or correlations between journal title, country of affiliation of Principal Investigator, access type of the article and the attention the article in question gets online. Logically the dataset I obtained and refined and its visualisations are not representative of all scholarly outputs with “Africa” in the title out there, but only of the data Altmetric is able to track in the first place.

The original dataset contained 2826 articles. I refined this set using Open Refine, to ensure there were no duplicates, text encoding errors, irrelevant entries (for example articles not about Africa but by authors whose first name is Africa, or academic news items that are not peer-reviewed). I then manually edited a CSV file of the top 25 peer-reviewed articles, and then created another one so I had only the categories I wanted to visualise and added other columns like PI country and Access Type.

I used Raw to make the diagrams. Alluvial diagrams can be helfpul to visualise flows and reveal correlations between categories; visually linking to the number of elements sharing the same categories. I wanted to see if this kind of diagram could provide a quick and clear insight on any possible correlations between access type and a higher number of online mentions. I manually looked at all the 25 articles, to check access type and country of affiliation of the Principal Investigators.

Though painstakingly time-consuming, I made some interesting discoveries in doing this by hand (for example many articles about Africa are co-authored by PIs based outside Africa with collaborators from African institutions, with an overwhelming South African majority). Another insight in the data but not visualised in these two charts is the dominance of articles with a focus on South Africa only.

I will share the original dataset file later on, as I still want to make sure the file is presentable enough to share publicly. In the meanwhile I have deposited both diagrams as figures to Figshare, and posted them here for your perusal. I will keep working on these diagrams, as they need to be edited to add different colours, etc., and to write-up a proper qualitative narrative of what we make of the data.

 Priego, Ernesto (2014): Alluvial Diagram- 25 Highest Scoring Academic Articles with 'Africa" in the Title, including Access Type. figshare. http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.942285
Priego, Ernesto (2014): Alluvial Diagram- 25 Highest Scoring Academic Articles with ‘Africa” in the Title, including Access Type. figshare.
http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.942285
 Priego, Ernesto (2014): Alluvial Diagram- 25 Highest Scoring Academic Articles with 'Africa" in the Title, including Access Type. figshare. http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.942285
Priego, Ernesto (2014): Alluvial Diagram- Country of Affiliation of Principal Investigator/Author of the 25 Highest Scoring Academic Articles with ‘Africa” in the Title, including Journal and Access Type. figshare.
http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.942286

A quick insight from both diagrams is that open access articles are having, according to Altmetric, more mentions online, on blogs, media and online social networks. African Principal Investigators, however, are the minority in this top 25 set, with only South African researchers representing the whole continent.

There is only one article which is not within the STEM disciplinary boundaries proper– on mobile phone coverage and its relationship to political violence, published in the American Political Science Review. This might also be a reflection on the sources Altmetric tracks (where social sciences, arts and humanities are a minority).

It is also noticeable there are two different articles in the Journal of Infectious Diseases on antiretroviral therapy, with very similar titles, one open access and the other paywalled. The former has a slightly higher Altmetric score. I could not find out if the authors of the paywalled article were the same, as the paywall did not link to author information.

It also appears that at least for articles with the term “Africa” in the title, from the journals that Altmetric tracks, UK authors are divided in their adoption of open access.

24 February 2014. Correction: I had accidentally added the same caption to both diagrams; I have corrected this so the second diagram has the correct caption and doi.

A follow-up was published here.

Public Knowledge Project Conference Tweets Archive #pkpconf

The Fourth International Public Knowledge Project Scholarly Publishing Conference was held August 19 – 21, 2013 in Mexico City, Mexico.

I have shared an archive of the tweets tagged with #pkpconf on figshare. I started the archive on Augutst 14 2013 at 15:02:58 GMT and the I closed the last tweet in the archive is from  01 September 2013 at 20:16:39 GMT.

The archive contains 841 tweets. Towards the end of the conference, the backchannel activity peaked at more than 450 tweets.

#pkpconf tweet volume over time
#pkpconf tweet volume over time

 

We found that our colleague Isabel Galina (@igalina) made the top of the list, closely followed by PKP’s Juan Pablo Alperin (@juancommander).

 

#pkpconf Top Tweeters
#pkpconf Top Tweeters

The tweets per person average was of 5.44, with a tweets per person median of 2.

Here’s hoping the archive is of some use to someone else.

#pkpconf Archive . Ernesto Priego. figshare.
http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.785782

Retrieved 15:23, Sep 02, 2013 (GMT)

 

 

 

 

At University of Venus/Inside Higher Education: Digital Humanities as Cognitive Dissidence

University of Venus

 

Thank you to University of Venus for publishing a bilingual version (English and Spanish) of my post on Digital Humanities as Cognitive Dissidence. Hopefully this will get it a new, different audience.