Podcasting for Research Dissemination: Launching the City Interaction Lab Podcast

Panel by Peter Wilkins, from I Know How This Ends
Panel by Peter Wilkins, from I Know How This Ends

City Interaction Lab Podcast – Episode 1 – Discussing Graphic Medicine and Co-Designed Comics 

Earlier this week we launched the City Interaction Lab Podcast with an inaugural episode where we talk about graphic medicine with Dr Simon Grennan (University of Chester) and Peter Wilkins (Douglas College, Vancouver Canada).

Brought to you by City Interaction Lab and the Centre for Human-Computer Interaction Design at City, University of London, the City Interaction Lab Podcast will be a series of thought-provoking design-focused audio episodes featuring interviews and opinions hosted by Stuart Scott and myself.

In this inaugural episode we discuss work co-designing the comics ‘Parables of Care‘ and ‘I Know How This Ends’ centred on dementia care. These complementary issues shine  light on those living with dementia and their carers.

We are aware of the issues with audio levels in this episode; we’ll do better next time!

Our gratitude to Professor Martin Eve for allowing us to use his track The Learning Experience as our podcast theme track.

The original audio file of the podcast has also been deposited in City Figshare.

Citation:

Priego, Ernesto; Scott, Stuart; Wilkins, Peter; Grennan, Simon (2019): City Interaction Lab Podcast – Episode 1 – Discussing Graphic Medicine and Co-Designed Comics – Parables of Care. City, University of London. Media. https://doi.org/10.25383/city.11347799.v1

More on Parables of Care

Parables of Care explores the potential of comics to enhance the impact of dementia care research.

The 16-page publication presents in comics form true stories of creative responses to dementia care, as told by carers, adapted from a group of over 100 case studies available at http://carenshare.city.ac.uk.

Parables of Care can be downloaded as a PDF file, under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License, from

If you work in a library, hospital, GP practice or care home- or care for someone with dementia in the UK, you can order a free copy of Parables of Care here: in the UK you can request printed copies at no cost here.

From the original post at https://blogs.city.ac.uk/hcidcomicsgames/2019/12/09/launching-the-interaction-lab-podcast/

Inaugural meeting of the Comics, Games & Media Research Group & First Blog Post

Panel from “Traitors to the Earth”, Captain Science #1, November 150; pencils by Gustav Schrotter, edited by Adolphe Barreaux. Public domain.
Panel from “Traitors to the Earth”, Captain Science #1, November 150; pencils by Gustav Schrotter, edited by Adolphe Barreaux. Public domain.

We had the inaugural meeting of the City HCID Comics, Games & Media Research Group this week!

The Comics, Games & Media Research Group is dedicated to exploring the interconnections between interaction design and narrative media.

The Group’s membership is comprised by academic staff and research students at the Centre for Human-Computer Interaction Design and the City Interaction Lab at City, University of London.

The group is particularly interested in narrative and speculative design activities that employ a variety of comics, games and related media as components of interaction design thinking.

The first session of the Comics, Games & Media Research Group took place on Wednesday 20th November 2019.

I have set up a blog for the group and made a first post to document our first meeting. More updates lined up.

I have copied and pasted the text of our first post below.

Launching the City HCID Comics, Games & Media Research Group

Photo of the inaugural meeting table on 2019-11-20 at 15.15.41

On Wednesday 20th November 2020 we held the inaugural meeting of the Comics, Games & Media Research Group at the Centre for Human-Computer Interaction Design at City, University of London.

This is a busy time of the academic year and we had a quorum of 6 members of HCID, with the membership still being dynamic and open. We took the opportunity to discuss our expectations for the group, our respective backgrounds and interests in the domains relevant to the group and discussed the next steps.

The launching of this group follows the beginning of the AHRC Collaborative Doctoral Project in partnership with the British Library, “UK Digital Comics: from creation to consumption” last month (there will be updates about that on this site soon).

Founded by Ernesto Priego and Stuart Scott, the Group is particularly interested in narrative and speculative design activities that employ a variety of comics, games and related media as components of interaction design thinking. (There will also be updates about that!)

The Group has clear objectives of research grant capture, developing scholarly outputs, and organising and hosting academic and enterprise events.

Stay tuned, for there will hopefully be more news soon.


 

Sobre co-diseño para recursos digitales en el sector cultural – Rostros del tiempo, 2o Coloquio de Vida Cotidiana en México

Hoy martes 3 de septiembre del 2019 participaré en el Segundo Coloquio de Vida Cotidiana en México, “Rostros del tiempo” a las 13:30hrs, en el Museo de Arte de la SHCP, Moneda 4, Centro Histórico, Ciudad de México. Entrada libre.

Mi presentación sintetizará aproximaciones de las ciencias sociales, el diseño interactivo o diseño centrado en el usuario (HCID) y las humanidades digitales explorando qué métodos podemos utilizar para buscar integrar más sustentablemente la vida cotidiana en México y los recursos digitales abiertos en el sector cultural mexicano.

Las principales preguntas que guiarán mi presentación serán:

 

  • ¿De qué hablamos cuando hablamos de “recursos” digitales en el sector cultural?
  • ¿Qué tipo de contextos, y qué tipo de instituciones y recursos digitales tenemos?
  • ¿Cómo puede contribuir la disciplina del diseño interactivo, o diseño centrado en el usuario (HCI; UX) a ‘conectar’ los recursos digitales con el público en su vida cotidiana?
  • ¿Qué significaría diseñar para conectar con usuarios de un modo sustentable y específico al contexto local?

 

 

El programa completo abajo.

Rostros del tiempo. Programa. Talleres.

Rostros del tiempo. Coloquio. Programa

Es un honor estar de vuelta en México para participar en este evento.

MakeWrite: Supporting Writing with Constrained Creativity

MakeWrite screenshot

I am pleased to announce that the INCA project has now launched MakeWrite, an iPad app that was co-designed by and for people with aphasia (a language difficulty following brain injury).

The app offers an accessible way for anyone to create and share texts in English. However, you don’t need to live with aphasia to try it out. Users can use existing text to make their own new piece of creative writing in four simple stages: choose, erase, arrange and share.

It was launched yesterday as part of UNESCO’s World Poetry Day.
This is its first release- it is a worldwide release for all iPad models, but if you are not in the UK and you experience difficulties downloading please do let us know- there should be no problems though.

Needless to say I’d personally love to see a multilingual MakeWrite, and of course one with a wider variety of source texts and an Android version too.

Link to the release on iTunes:

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/makewrite/id1456271313?mt=8 

Find out more about the INCA Project at https://blogs.city.ac.uk/inca/

Digital Comics AHRC Collaborative PhD Opportunities with the British Library

I am delighted to announce that The British Library (British Library) and City, University of London (City) will be offering a fully-funded PhD studentship (including fees and living allowance) on the research theme of ‘Understanding UK digital comics information and publishing practices: From creation to consumption.’ The supervision team for this particular collaborative PhD will be:

  • City, University of London Supervisors: Dr Ernesto Priego (Lecturer, Centre for Human Computer-Interaction Design) and Dr Stephann Makri (Senior Lecturer in Human-Computer Interaction)
  • British Library Supervisors: Ian Cooke (Head of Contemporary British Publications) and Stella Wisdom (Digital curator)

We are super excited that another collaborative studentship on UK Digital Comics, between the British Library and the University of the Arts London (co-supervised by Dr Ian Hague and Professor Roger Sabin) will soon be advertised too.

This means that two of four fully-funded AHRC British Library Collaborative Doctoral Partnerships will focus on UK digital comics. These are incredible news for UK comics scholarship, and a testament of the growth of the field in recent years.

The projects have been developed for the AHRC Collaborative Doctoral Partnerships scheme. The successful candidates will be able to work with the project supervisors to further develop and refine the agreed focus of the research.

Initial announcement on the British Library website at https://www.bl.uk/news/2019/february/ahrc-cdp-2019

Application deadline and further details coming soon… watch this space!

HCID Research Seminar: The Question Concerning Comics as Technology: Gestell and Grid. Implications for HCID

A. (2015). When the Last Story is Told. Malmo: C’est Bon Kultur. © 2015.
A page from Allan Haverholm’s When the Last Story is Told. Haverholm, A. (2015). When the Last Story is Told. Malmo: C’est Bon Kultur. © 2015.

 

Today I will give a talk as part of the Centre for Human Computer Interaction Design‘s HCID Research Seminar series.

Talk Title: The Question Concerning Comics as Technology: Gestell and Grid. Implications for HCID

Time: 13:00, Friday 23 November 2018
Room: AG11

Abstract:

In this presentation I will discuss recent research (Priego and Wilkins 2018) where we propose that the goal of the comics grid is to manage, dynamically, what we call “a potentially overwhelming sublime space” through a process of “enframing”. I will argue that this enframing continues to take place well beyond the printed page, and that therefore traditional comic scholarship approaches will need to continue adapting their focus to what new technologies reveal about comics. I will provide examples of how the notion of the  ‘page’ is getting continuously redefined by screen-based media and by comics reading applications.

 In this context, I will argue that fields concerned with screen-based media interactions, such as Human-Computer Interaction Design, should be expected to continue making important contributions to our understanding of comics, for instance, through methods of visual analysis where technology (such as eye-tracking) are used for evaluating how people interact with media. Understanding comics as a type of information architecture, with the grid as a particular type of interface design, can potentially provide different types of explanations of its effectiveness as a means to display and manage otherwise overwhelming volumes and types of information (see for example Kammerer and Gerjets 2010; Bach et al 2018; Tabassum et al 2018).

References

Priego, E. and Wilkins, P., 2018. The Question Concerning Comics as Technology: Gestell and Grid. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 8, p.16. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.133

Kammerer, Y and Gerjets, P. 2010. How the interface design influences users’ spontaneous trustworthiness evaluations of web search results: comparing a list and a grid interface. In: Proceedings of the 2010 Symposium on Eye-Tracking Research & Applications (ETRA ‘10), 299–306. ACM, New York, NY, USA. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/1743666.1743736

Bach, B, Wang, Z, Farinella, M, Murray-Rust, D and Riche, NH. 2018. Design Patterns for Data Comics. In: Proceedings of the 2018 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI ‘18), 12. ACM, New York, NY, USA, Paper 38. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/3173574.3173612

Tabassum, M, Alqhatani, A, Aldossari, M and Richter Lipford, H. 2018. Increasing User Attention with a Comic-based Policy. In: Proceedings of the 2018 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI ‘18), 6. ACM, New York, NY, USA, Paper 200. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/3173574.3173774

Presenting at HCID Open Day 2018: On Comics and Collaborative Art Practice as Human-Computer Interaction Methodology

The HCID Open Day 2018 is a mini conference on Friday 4th May run by the Centre for Human Computer Interaction Design (HCID) at City, University of London.

The theme for this year will be ‘Beyond the Screen’ and will focus on designing non screen based interactions, exploring technology that has made the jump from science fiction into reality and how UX thinking can be used for more than just interfaces.

I will present at the HCID Open Day 2018 as part of the knowledge exchange and impact activities around the Parables of Care project. My presentation is titled Meaningful Patterns: Comics and Collaborative Art Practice as HCI Research.’

Recent research has explored the use of collaborative art practice as a Human-Computer Interaction methodology (Kang et al 2014 and 2018; Benford et al 2013; Brynjarsdyttir et al 2013). In this talk I will describe how the Parables of Care project is employing collaborative comics-making as a user-centred methodology as a means to collect and disseminate data, reflect, design and propose strategies for dementia care.

I worked in partnership with Dr Simon Grennan of the University of Chester, Dr Peter Wilkins of Douglas College, Vancouver, Canada, an NHS Trust, and colleagues from HCID, leading the team to produce Parables of Care, that uses comics as a medium to evoke the kind of de-structured and re-structured experience of time that is akin to dementia, to illness, ageing and caring.

Register here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/hcid-open-day-2018-beyond-the-screen-tickets-44666147650

Hashtags: ;

Parables of Care is a project of the Centre for Human Computer Interaction Design, City, University of London, The University of Chester, UK, and Douglas College, Vancouver, Canada.

Parables of Care can be downloaded as a PDF file, under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License, from City Research Online: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/18245/.

If you live in the UK you can request printed copies at no cost here.

HCID Research Seminar: Making Parables of Care

Simon Grennan, Disposession

HCID Research Seminar: Making Parables of Care – Presenting creative responses to dementia care in comic book form

Friday 17 November 2017, 1:00-1:50 PM, A214

Dr Simon Grennan (University of Chester) will present at the HCID Research Seminar series at City, University of London (College Building, Room A214) tomorrow Friday 17 November at 1pm.

All welcome. If you are not a member of City, University of London and would like to join us for this seminar, please contact Katerina.Bourazeri@city.ac.uk for further details.

This seminar will discuss the practical rationale, theorisation and production of Parables of Care, a new 16-page colour comic book, which presents creative responses to dementia care, as told by carers, derived from a group of existing case studies available at http://carenshare.city.ac.uk.

Parables of Care is an impact project of the Centre for HCID, City, University of London, the University of Chester and Douglas College, Canada. Distributed as free hard copies and a free download to carers and those engaged in debates about dementia care, the book investigates the ways in which specific habits of reading comics can be activated in order to engage readers emotionally, as well as informatively, concerning the challenges of caring for people with dementia.

Full info at https://blogs.city.ac.uk/parablesofcare/2017/11/16/hcid-research-seminar-making-parables-of-care-presenting-creative-responses-to-dementia-care-in-comic-book-form

https://www.city.ac.uk/events/2017/november/hcid-research-seminar-making-parables-of-care-presenting-creative-responses-to-dementia-care-in-comic-book-form

If you are not a member of City, University of London and would like to join us for this seminar, please contact Katerina.Bourazeri@city.ac.uk for further details.

Parables of Care can be downloaded as a PDF file, under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License, from City Research Online: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/18245/.

If you live in the UK you can request printed copies at no cost here.

An Interview with Peter Wilkins re: Parables of Care

I interviewed Peter Wilkins a few days ago for the Parables of Care blog, and I have copied and pasted the post below:

Dr Peter Wilkins, Douglas College
Dr Peter Wilkins, Douglas College

Dr Peter Wilkins is the Research and Innovation Coordinator at Douglas College (Canada), and he manages programs for at-risk youth for the Douglas College Training Group. Peter is a founding editor (with David N. Wright) of Graphixia and the Deputy Editor of The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship.

Peter worked in partnership with Dr Simon Grennan of the University of Chester, Dr Ernesto Priego of City, University of London, and an NHS Trust, to produce Parables of Care.

We asked Peter some questions about working on Parables of Care.

What is it that most interested you about Care’N’Share as a resource?

Peter Wilkins: Care‘N’Share gives a startling insight into the caregivers’ relationship to the dementia situation and their patients. I think we were all struck by the power of the stories even though they often occur in the most mundane settings. If we looked at it from a literary or narrative point of view, the stories often begin in realist mode and then suddenly shift into a surrealist or absurdist one.

The caregiver is like a character who passes through the wardrobe into a Narnia painted by Salvador Dali. Or like Marlowe going into the Congo in Heart of Darkness. They bring back something that gives us a glimpse into an alternative reality that shocks and frightens us. The uncanniness of the stories made me think of an untapped potential in using art, not as therapy, but as a means of accounting for dementia in a way that medical discourse doesn’t allow us to do.

http://carenshare.city.ac.uk/

Some stories in Parables of Care appear to be more or less difficult to ‘get’. What was the thinking behind it?

PW: Well, dementia is difficult to ‘get.’ Indeed, it is what philosophers would call sublime, unpresentable. This is where the idea of parable as a form or genre comes from and why we were so interested in the stories in the app. They are stories of practical reason, of enigmatic utility, of not knowing what to do in a difficult situation. This quality of the stories lends to the caregivers a kind of poetic heroism: they are faced with demands from the other side of rationality, dementia world, that they have to respond to in creative ways. So our conclusion was that caregivers are poets. To present the comics as easy solutions to the difficult problems of caring for people with dementia would not do justice to the caregivers.

On a related note, we were not interested in using the comics medium as a way of making things appear simple, in an “instrumental” use of comics. We don’t care for the idea of comics as simplistic communication; we care for the idea of comics as provocative works of art that will make their audience think and think again. It was great to work with Simon because he understands this through and through, and his drawings work really well at managing the audience’s response.

Peter Wilkins and members of the Douglas College Psychiatric Nursing team participate remotely at a Parables of Care workshop at City, 22 March 2017
Dr Peter Wilkins and members of the Douglas College Nursing team participate remotely with City Publishing & Creative Industries and HCID participants at a Parables of Care workshop, 22 March 2017, City, University of London

You are based in Vancouver, Canada. Can you tell us more about Douglas College‘s involvement in Parables of Care?

PW: We want to produce a companion volume to Parables that depicts the attitudes towards, and knowledge about, dementia from faculty and students across our Health Sciences faculty. We are working with focus groups from a range of programs, from Nursing through Dental Assisting, to generate material for the comic. The enthusiasm for the project here is tremendous, so we are very excited.

We are involving students in the work, which is important to us. They are running the focus groups and collecting the data. We have a young artist who has more experience in video game design than comics, but she is very committed and enthusiastic. It will be interesting to see how her work plays off of Simon [Grennan]’s. Sarah Leavitt, whose Tangles: A Story of Alzheimer’s, My Mother and Me is a groundbreaking graphic memoir on the subject, is consulting on the project, working with the artist.

Cover of Tangles, by Sarah Leavitt (Broadview Press, 2010)
Cover of Tangles, by Sarah Leavitt (Broadview Press, 2010)

A number of people from the faculty have told me about how they are professional caregivers, but when one of their family members has been struck by dementia they have been incapable of dealing with it. I’m interested in capturing those stories.

In any event, I see Parables of Care as the beginning of a much larger project that explores and documents dementia in comic book form.

Did you identify differences in how Canada and the UK approach dementia care?

PW: I can’t answer this question yet, but I hope to have some clues as we compare the data we collect with that from the Care‘N’Share app. I suspect that there will be differences and that they will be meaningful because even within Canada the different caregiving disciplines that engage with dementia don’t seem to communicate with each other that much. There are all kinds of gaps in the responses. I hope that the project allows people who work with dementia sufferers and their families to connect some dots and work towards a more holistic and universal approach to care.

There’s more than a hundred cases in Care’N’Share. As an editor, how did you approach the collection?

Our approach was to identify cases that represented particular strands of the dementia situation. While each case is unique, the stories do fall into categories: broken analogies, misrecognition, confinement and a desire for freedom and so on. What is important is that there are lots of satisfying though enigmatic eureka moments, where the undoubtable horror of dementia is relieved temporarily by the caregiver’s sympathy and genius.

Parables of Care can be downloaded as a PDF file, under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License, from City Research Online: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/18245/.

If you live in the UK you can request printed copies at no cost here.

This post was originally published on the Parables of Care blog on 19 October 2017 at https://blogs.city.ac.uk/parablesofcare/2017/10/19/parables-of-care-a-qa-with-peter-wilkins/. If links to embedded media appear broken it is because the original post may have been changed or undergoing maintenance.

An Interview with Simon Grennan re: Parables of Care

I interviewed Simon Grennan last week for the Parables of Care blog, and I have copied and pasted the post here.

 

Dr Simon Grennan, University of Chester
Dr Simon Grennan, University of Chester

Dr Simon Grennan, is a Post-Doctoral Research Fellow in Art and Design at the Department of Art and Design, University of Chester. He is an internationally acclaimed contemporary artist, comics scholar and author of over 40 comics and artists’ books.

Simon worked in partnership with Dr Ernesto Priego of City, University of London, Dr Peter Wilkins of Douglas College, Vancouver, Canada and an NHS Trust, to produce Parables of Care.

We asked Simon some questions about working on Parables of Care.

What was your first impression of the Care’N’Share stories?

Simon Grennan: I was immediately fascinated by the combination of descriptions of emotional/physical challenges and the extreme brevity of the case studies. The stories told by carers already conformed to a rather strict pattern derived from a proforma, designed to enable speedy access to the information that each story provides, for readers. This might have denuded the case studies of their affective aspects, but in fact, it focused and intensified them. That was immediately striking and interesting.

 

http://carenshare.city.ac.uk/

 

What was the most challenging for you in the drawing process?


SG: The editorial task for Peter, Ernesto and I involved considering how this combination of emotional impact, information and brevity could be visualised. The concept of the parable offered an accurate description of the stories as told by carers: the original stories already had the effect of parables.

We lighted upon a key aspect of the parable – its function of representing big effects (issues, truths, significant ideas) by small means. This ‘big in small’ characteristic was actually quite easy to visualise, because there is a great range of visual models, particularly in the history and traditions of the comic strip: visual gags, for example.

We immediately thought of the four panel Japanese ‘yonkoma joke strips, which follow a set pattern for divisions of action. The form both produces and disperses ambiguity. That’s the way in which it works as a visual joke. Although the Care’N’Share stories aren’t jokes, by any means, part of their ‘parable’ character articulates exactly this manipulation of clarity and ambiguity. This seemed like a form particularly suited to these particular stories about dementia care, in which initial challenges to capacity, comprehension and communications are overcome by creative means.

In each story, there is a challenging scenario resulting from a specific experience of dementia, which is then reflected/acted up and finally resolved. For me, the task was then to visually articulate this balance of ambiguity and clarity in the narrative drawing, first creating a level of affective unclarity in the reader that I then develop and finally resolve.

As with visual jokes, creating the right affective balance between ambiguity and clarity is the main task. Too much ambiguity and the reader doesn’t know what’s happening. To much clarity and the reader has no emotional stake in the story. In both of these scenarios, the joke (or in this case, affect) disappears and the story fails.

I hope that I’ve managed to get the balance right! If so, each story should function as a parable, packing a lot of emotional punch (and taking the reader from ambiguity to clarity) with very few means.

 

 Dr Simon Grennan during one of the Parables of Care workshops, 22 March 2017, City, University of London
Dr Simon Grennan during one of the Parables of Care workshops, 22 March 2017, City, University of London

 

‘A Theory of Narrative Drawing’: what theoretical principles did you apply in Parables of Care?


That’s an interesting question. My new book A Theory of Narrative Drawing seeks to explain experiences of drawn stories, but it’s not quite a handbook for drawing stories! However, one of the interesting things about Parables of Care is its self-announcing, overt reliance upon the reader to articulate the visual story and the story world. Of course, the reader always undertakes this articulation, in every story.

However, in Parables of Care, this is entirely due to the creation of ambiguity in each story. These are stories where a reader feels that they can or are making mistaken readings or, if the stories don’t clarify themselves for some readers, they think that the stories are simply incoherent or/and badly told. It is only when a reader realises that ‘making mistakes’ is an affective substitute for aspects of the experiences of dementia that are told about in each story, for example, that the sensation of ambiguity is transformed, located and resolved. This is entirely the type of affective reading that A Theory of Narrative Drawing explains.

 

What are you hoping Parables of Care can achieve?


SG: I hope that Parables of Care will focus attention on the emotional aspects of dementia care. We have worked hard to introduce readers to the (largely non-clinical) experience of dementia care by providing them with affective sensations of ambiguity, including a sense of inexplicable altered capacity, frustration and maybe a sense of powerlessness. These sensations are turned around and articulated in each story, retaining the emotional intelligence and creativity of the resolutions to challenging situations. The reader goes throught this process too, and reaches a similar clarity and resolve.

Parables of Care can be downloaded as a PDF file, under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License, from City Research Online: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/18245/.

If you live in the UK you can request printed copies at no cost here.

This interview was originally published at https://blogs.city.ac.uk/parablesofcare/2017/10/12/parables-of-care-a-qa-with-simon-grennan/. If links to embedded media appear broken it is because the original post may have been changed or undergoing maintenance.

Parables of Care: A Comic About Dementia Care, Available for Free

Parables of Care unboxed

I am very pleased that Parables of Care. Creative Responses to Dementia Care, as Told by Carers is now available. It is a 16-page publication presenting true stories of creative responses to dementia care, as told by carers.

  • Parables of Care can be downloaded as a PDF file, under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License, from City Research Online: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/18245/.
  • If you live in the UK you can request printed copies at no cost here.

The stories were adapted from a group of over 100 case studies available at http://carenshare.city.ac.uk.

Parables of Care is a project of the Centre for Human Comuter Interaction Design, City, University of London, The University of Chester, UK, and Douglas College, Vancouver, Canada.

Parables of Care was edited and adapted by Dr Simon Grennan (University of Chester) Dr Ernesto Priego (City, University of London) and Dr Peter Wilkins (Douglas College).  Parables of Care was drawn by Dr Simon Grennan with Christopher Sperandio.

Research has shown that comics have the potential to have a positive impact on the health and quality of life of people who engage in comics reading and creation, contributing to transform attitudes, awareness and behaviour around illness and contributing to create new opportunities for empowerment and more positive behaviour (Cardiff University 2014). Parables of Care explores the potential of comics to enhance the impact of dementia care research in particular.

Parables of Care seeks to make a contribution to enhancing the public impact of the best practices in dementia care resulting from City HCID research by exploring and embracing the communicative affordances of graphic storytelling in general and graphic medicine in specific.

We hope that Parables of Care contributes to enabling stronger links between academia, dementia care practice and comics scholars and practitioners.

The response so far has been amazing. Read this review by John Freeman at the British Comics site Down the Tubes, published shortly after we announced the comic publicly.

Stay tuned for news regarding distribution points, events and more information about the project!

Parables of Care received funding from the MCSE School Impact Fund, City, University of London 2016-2017.

 

Pint of Science: Comics, Humans and Technology in the Pub! 16 May 2017

I am pleased to announce I will participate at the following Pint of Science event:

Humans and technology: in life and in death

Tuesday 16 May 2017

Doors open 6.30 PM, Event 7.00 PM – 9.30 PM

The Artillery Arms 102 Bunhill Row,
London EC1Y 8ND

Come along and live it up – it’ll be dead fun.  The function room is on the first floor, with no wheelchair access.

Technology is everywhere. Its involvement in our world changes across the lifespan. This evening will explore some of the ways researchers are applying different technologies as we age. You’ll hear how technology can be used both as we live and as we die. Expert speakers from City, University of London will introduce you to a world of smart homes, virtual rehabilitation and mobile phone autopsies – a world where online comics are being used to make sense of both life and death.

Full programme info and registration at https://pintofscience.co.uk/event/humans-and-technology-in-life-and-in-death-

Hope to see you there!