#OABooks and the Guide to Creative Commons for Humanities and Social Science Authors

The Guide to Creative Commons for Humanities and Social Science Monograph Authors

[Another belated post… trying to catch up…]

On the 1 and 2 July 2013, JISC Collections, and the OAPEN Foundation, held the Open Access Monographs in the Humanities and Social Sciences conference (#OAbooks). It was hosted at the British Library conference centre and was attended by over 250 international delegates from from all areas of scholarly communications.

If you click on the link you’ll find slides and videos from the main presentations.

The conference saw the launch of the Guide to Creative Commons for Humanities and Social Science Monograph Authors (2013) developed by the OAPEN-UK team: Ellen Collins, Caren Milloy and Graham Stone.

James Baker, Martin Paul Eve and I had the opportunity to work as editors of the guide. The editing process was a real joy as we followed open collaboration practices; we worked on a shared Google Document and held discussions in real time on the document itself, and as inserted comments and via email.

We worked with representatives of the publishing and legal sectors, and with experts from Creative Commons UK. Different opinions were considered and disagreements were solved in a professional manner, and in the end we showed online, open, horizontal, collaborative methods can have satisfactory results.

The Guide was distributed on print at the conferece in every delegate pack, and is also available to read online or to download as a PDF. Needless to say, the Guide is licensed with a Creative Commons- Attribution license.

I had the pleasure to give a brief introduction to the Guide on the second day of the conference, within the first strand, titled “How exactly do you get your monograph published in open access?”

For my presentation I showed the ISSUU version embedded on the JISC site for the Guide, here, contextualising the rationale for the Guide and its contents, giving the audience a personal ‘guided tour’ of the document, section by section.

I thoroughly enjoyed the conference, particularly the keynotes by Kathleen Fitzpatrick (view video) (view presentation) and Cameron Neylon  (view video) (view presentation).

At the British Library: Open Access Monographs in the Humanities and Social Sciences Conference

 Open Access Monographs in the Humanities and Social Sciences Conference

As many of you already know the Open Access Monographs in the Humanities and Social Sciences conference will take place the 1st and 2nd of July 2013 at the British Library in London.

I will participate within the second strand, titled “How exactly do you get your monograph published in open access?.” I will focus on issues around copyright and Creative Commons for HSS researchers.

I am honoured for the kind invitation; the whole programme (still being updated) is looking amazing!

Visualising #digitrans

Screenshot of a fragment of a #digitrans TAGSExplorer visualisation
Screenshot of a fragment of a #digitrans TAGSExplorer visualisation, 20/11/2012 1:07 PM GMT

Yesterday I attended the Digital Transformations Moot organised by the Arts and Humanities Research Council in London. My colleague Sarah Quinnell and I participated in the ‘Yack Space’ with a ten-minute flash presentation on our Networked Researcher project. You can view our slides here.

This morning I used Martin Hawksey‘s TAGSExplorer to create a visualisation of a Google spreadsheet archive of the #digitrans tweets. You can view it here.

By tweaking the visualisation’s URL you can also see the nodes connected by @ mentions and @ replies, here.

And if you want to push your browser to the limit and see web entanglement in full effect, the archive can also visualise RTs (here).

Note that the visualisation is in fact an interactive, searchable arhive. You can click on nodes to find out more and also search by keyword.

The Google spreadsheet archive was created once the event had finished (this morning around 9:00am GMT) and it updates itself every fifteen minutes. Nevertheless since the RL event officially concluded last night we can argue most of the event’s backchannel tweets have been collected. At the time of writing this post the archive had collected 1517 unique tweets:

#digitrans archive summary with top 20 tweeters
 #digitrans archive summary with top 20 tweeters. Screen shot taken 20/11/2012 12:48 PM GMT.

As expected most of the tweets were posted during the day of the event (19 November 2012), with some activity some days before and the day after:

#digitrans tweet volume over time graph
 #digitrans tweet volume over time. Screenshot taken 20/11/2012 12:54  PM GMT.

The top tweeters were divided between the organisers, speakers and attendants:

#digitrans top tweeters percentages pie chart
#digitrans top tweeters percentages. Screenshot taken 12:53 PM GMT.

I have found Martin Hawksey’s tool very useful to collect, archive, visualise and analyse Twitter activity, particularly academic conference backchannels. It offers a way of revealing the intrinsically networked and social (as in, involving human interaction) nature of a Twitter’s stream data.

As a form of data mining and distant reading, visualising archives of Twitter backchannels (and therefore networks) can be a useful way of demonstrating an event’s public impact and of discovering key participants, topics, sentiment and links.