The Lockdown Chronicles 20: Edith

This is just a thumbnail. To go to the comic strip, click on the blog post URL.

Click on the image below to read the comic strip in full size. Sources and references on this post under the comic strip below.

Edith is studying to become a nurse.
Click on image for full size.

As in the rest of this series, this is a homage; liberties were taken with the historical source material.

Edith Louisa Cavell (4 December 1865 – 12 October 1915) was a British nurse. She is celebrated for saving the lives of soldiers from both sides without discrimination and in helping some 200 Allied soldiers escape from German-occupied Belgium during the First World War, for which she was arrested. She was accused of treason, found guilty by a court-martial and sentenced to death. Despite international pressure for mercy, she was shot by a German firing squad. Her execution received worldwide condemnation and extensive press coverage. The night before her execution, she said, “Patriotism is not enough. I must have no hatred or bitterness towards anyone.” These words were later inscribed on a memorial to her near Trafalgar Square. Her strong Anglican beliefs propelled her to help all those who needed it, both German and Allied soldiers. She was quoted as saying, “I can’t stop while there are lives to be saved.” The Church of England commemorates her in its Calendar of Saints on 12 October. Cavell, who was 49 at the time of her execution, was already notable as a pioneer of modern nursing in Belgium. [Wikipedia entry]

Source texts:  Belgian Edith Cavell Commemoration Group, (2015) “Edith Cavell Story”; Pickles, Katie (2017) “Cavell, Edith Louisa”, International Encyclopedia of the First World War, Freie Universität Berlin, Berlin; quotes from St George’s Hospital medical staff as quoted in Bayley, Sian (23 March 2020) “Coronavirus deaths at St George’s Hospital rises to 15”, News. The Wandsworth Times; White, Emma (2016) A History of Britain in 100 Dogs, Cheltenham: The History Press.

Source images: Panel 1: Harcourt, Bosworth W. Swardeston Common, August 15 1895 (drawing, Norwich Castle Museum & Art Gallery, © Norfolk Museums Service, CC-BY-NC-SA 4.0 Panels 2-4: Edith Louisa Cavell in Red Cross uniform. Colour process print after E. M. Ross, 1915. Wellcome Library no. 9872i, Wellcome Images, Wellcome Collection. CC-BY 4.0. This comic strip CC-BY-NC-SA.

References

Belgian Edith Cavell Commemoration Group, (2015) “Edith Cavell Story”; available at http://www.edith-cavell-belgium.eu/edith-cavell-story.html [Accessed 5 May 2020]

Pickles, Katie: Cavell, Edith Louisa (Version 1.1), in: 1914-1918-online. International Encyclopedia of the First World War, ed. by Ute Daniel, Peter Gatrell, Oliver Janz, Heather Jones, Jennifer Keene, Alan Kramer, and Bill Nasson, issued by Freie Universität Berlin, Berlin 2017-01-24. DOI: 10.15463/ie1418.10214/1.1. [Accessed 5 May 2020]

Tweets by Tooting MP and A&E doctor at St George’s Hospital, Dr Rosena Allin-Khan, and Dr Lisa Anderson, consultant cardiologist at St George’s Hospital, to the BBC’s Andrew Marr (22 March 2020), as quoted by Bayley, Sian (23 March 2020) “Coronavirus deaths at St George’s Hospital rises to 15”, News. The Wandsworth Times, available at  https://www.wandsworthguardian.co.uk/news/18328407.coronavirus-deaths-st-georges-hospital-rises-15/ [Accessed 5 May 2020]

White, Emma (2016) A History of Britain in 100 Dogs, Cheltenham: The History Press. Excerpt available at https://www.thehistorypress.co.uk/articles/edith-cavell-and-her-furry-four-legged-friends/ [Accessed 5 May 2020]

Harcourt, Bosworth W. Swardeston Common, August 15 1895 (drawing) Norwich Castle Museum & Art Gallery, Norfolk Museums Service, available at http://norfolkmuseumscollections.org/collections/objects/object-3860293849.html [Accessed 5 May 2020]

Edith Louisa Cavell in Red Cross uniform. Colour process print after E. M. Ross, 1915. Wellcome Library no. 9872i, Wellcome Images, Wellcome Collection, available at https://wellcomecollection.org/works/ym9xg9kp [Accessed 5 May 2020]

Judson, Helen (1941) “Edith Cavell”. The American Journal of Nursing. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. 41 (7): 871. doi:10.2307/3415077

The Lockdown Chronicles is a series of periodical comic strips made at night (in candlelight!) adapting and reusing openly-licensed or public domain items from online digital collections. Publication and tweetage are scheduled in advance. Historical sources are adapted and updated for the current pandemic; please refer to each strip’s references on each post for further context.  Catch up with the series at https://epriego.blog/tag/the-lockdown-chronicles/.

The Lockdown Chronicles 14: Virginia

This is just a thumbnail. To go to the comic strip, click on the blog post URL.

Work, even in poverty and obscurity, is worth while.”

– Virginia Woolf, A Room of One’s Own (1929)

 

Click on the image below to read the comic strip in full size. Sources and references on this post under the comic strip below.

Virginia said she would order the flowers herself.
Click on image for full size.

Adeline Virginia Woolf ( 25 January 1882 – 28 March 1941) was an English writer, considered one of the most important modernist 20th-century authors. Her novel Mrs Dalloway (1925) and her essay  A Room of One’s Own (1929) (in which she wrote the much-quoted dictum, “A woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction”) are among her best-known works. [Wikipedia Entry].

Source text: Panel 1: BBC News. 28 April 2020. “Coronavirus: Remembering 100 NHS and healthcare workers who have died”. bbc.co.uk; Woolf, Virginia (1925) Mrs. Dalloway, text via Project Gutenberg of Australia; panels 2 and 4: Woolf, Virginia (1935) [1929] A Room of One’s Own, text via Project Gutenberg of Australia; both originally published in London by Hogarth Press.

Source image: Photograph of Virginia Woolf aged 20, (January 25, 1882 – March 28, 1941) by George Charles Beresford (10 July 1864 – 21 February 1938), via Wikimedia Commons. Public Domain. This comic strip CC-BY-NC-SA.

 

References

BBC News (28 April 2020). “Coronavirus: Remembering 100 NHS and healthcare workers who have died”. Available at https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-52242856# [accessed 28 April 2020]

Woolf, Virginia (1925) Mrs. Dalloway, text via Project Gutenberg of Australia: http://gutenberg.net.au/ebooks02/0200991h.html [accessed 28 April 2020]

Woolf, Virginia (1935) [1929] A Room of One’s Own, text via Project Gutenberg of Australia: http://gutenberg.net.au/ebooks02/0200791.txt [accessed 28 April 2020]

A Room of One’s Own by Virginia Woolf. Book. Collection Items. The British Library. Available at https://www.bl.uk/collection-items/a-room-of-ones-own-by-virginia-woolf [accessed 28 April 2020]

Bradshaw, David (25 May 2016). “Mrs Dalloway and the First World War”. The British Library. Available at https://www.bl.uk/20th-century-literature/articles/mrs-dalloway-and-the-first-world-war [accessed 28 April 2020]

Bowlby, Rachel (25 May 2016). “An introduction to A Room of One’s Own” Available at https://www.bl.uk/20th-century-literature/articles/an-introduction-to-a-room-of-ones-own  [accessed 28 April 2020]

George Charles Beresford – Virginia Woolf in 1902. Wikimedia Commons. Available at https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:George_Charles_Beresford_-_Virginia_Woolf_in_1902_-_Restoration.jpg [accessed 28 April 2020]

 

P.S. Needless to say the National Portrait Gallery, London, has an extraordinary online collection of digitised Virginia Woolf portraits in their collection. However their licensing impedes derivatives (why?!) so  my only option was to use the Wikimedia Commons version.  [If you read all the way here thank you- you are my ideal reader!].

The Lockdown Chronicles is a series of periodical comic strips made at night (in candlelight!) adapting and reusing openly-licensed or public domain items from online digital collections. Publication and tweetage are scheduled in advance. Historical sources are adapted and updated for the current pandemic; please refer to each strip’s references on each post for further context.  Catch up with the series at https://epriego.blog/tag/the-lockdown-chronicles/.

The Lockdown Chronicles 13: Dr Mead

 

This is just a thumbnail. To go to the comic strip, click on the blog post URL.Click on the image below to read the comic strip in full size. Sources and references on this post under the comic strip below.

Dr Mead prescribes continuing the 'quarentine'.
Click on image for full size.

Richard Mead, FRS, FRCP, (11 August 1673 – 16 February 1754) was an English physician. His work, A Short Discourse concerning Pestilential Contagion, and the Method to be used to prevent it (1720) [text] [digitised] was written in reaction to the outbreak at Marseilles. In 1703 he was elected physician to St. Thomas’ Hospital. [Wikipedia entry] [On Marseille, cfr this case study from The Edward Worth Library].

Text adapted from A Short Discourse concerning Pestilential Contagion, and the Method to be used to prevent it (1720), by Richard Mead (1673-1754). Text version via Eighteenth Century Collections Online, Text Creation Partnership.

Source images: Panel 1: Old St. Thomas’s Hospital, Southwark: the entrance courtyard. Engraving. Wellcome Library no. 39315i; Wellcome Collection, Wellcome Images, CC BY 4.0. Panels 2-4: Richard Mead. Reproduction of drawing, 1888, after W. Hogarth. Wellcome Library no. 6457iM; Wellcome Collection, Wellcome Images, CC BY 4.0 This comic strip CC-BY-NC-SA.

 

References

Mead, Richard. (1720). A short discourse concerning pestilential contagion: and the methods to be used to prevent it.  London: printed for Sam. Buckley, and Ralph Smith, 1720. Text version via Eighteenth Century Collections Online, Text Creation Partnership, available at: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/004833363.0001.000. The digitised version is available via the Wellcome Library, Wellcome Collection, at https://wellcomecollection.org/works/gg3azyks [Accessed 27 April 2020].

The Edward Worth Library, “Case Study: Plague at Marseilles 1720”. Infectious Diseases at The Edward Worth Library. Available at https://infectiousdiseases.edwardworthlibrary.ie/plague/marseilles-case-study/ [Accessed 27 April 2020].

Old St. Thomas’s Hospital, Southwark: the entrance courtyard. Engraving. Wellcome Library no. 39315i; Wellcome Collection, Wellcome Images, available at https://wellcomecollection.org/works/m7xt98x2 [Accessed 27 April 2020].

Richard Mead. Reproduction of drawing, 1888, after W. Hogarth. Wellcome Library no. 6457iM; Wellcome Collection, Wellcome Images, available at https://wellcomecollection.org/works/ufzwpn7c [Accessed 27 April 2020].

NHS England and NHS. Coronavirus. Primary Care. (2020). Accessing supplies of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE). Available at  https://www.england.nhs.uk/coronavirus/primary-care/infection-control/ppe/ [Accessed 27 April 2020].

The Lockdown Chronicles is a series of periodical comic strips made at night (in candlelight!) adapting and reusing openly-licensed or public domain items from online digital collections. Publication and tweetage are scheduled in advance. Historical sources are adapted and updated for the current pandemic; please refer to each strip’s references on each post for further context.  Catch up with the series at https://epriego.blog/tag/the-lockdown-chronicles/.

“In a sickly time”: Reading Pepys in 2020

Samuel Pepys, Image via Wikipedia. Image file by John Hayls - Walthamstow Weekender (file), Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=210769

 

I have a little bookcase where I have books about London, short story collections and other brief volumes (such as Penguin’s Little Black Classics) thinking of visitors who might want a quick read. Lately this bookcase has been my go-to resource when I can’t sleep.

Last night, unable to go to bed early worrying about everything that’s happening in the world, at work and at home, nearby and faraway, I grabbed one of those Penguins, number 47, “The Great Fire of London”, containing entries from The Diary of Samuel Pepys dated May 1st to June 31st, 1665, and September 2nd to 15th, 1666.

It’s common-place now to think of Pepys as a 17th century protoblogger. I have, in the past, many a time recurred to the Diary in a second-hand two-volume Everyman edition I treasure. I like dipping in and out from it at random.

 

My copy of The Diary of Samuel Pepys, Vol I., Everyman's Classics

The first half of the little Penguin volume, May 1st to June 31st, 1665, contains many references to the plague. What’s striking to me is how contemporary the account feels- though Pepys was noticeably concerned about the “encrease” of the plague, he also continued his daily life as socially active as ever, kissing people’s hands and all.

Pepys keeps count of the increasing fatalities, and the safety he feels being in the “City” relatively diminishes as the plague gets very close home:

10 June 1665

In the evening home to supper, and there to my great trouble hear that the plague is come into the City (though it hath these three or four weeks since its beginning been wholly out of the City); but where should it begin but in my good friend and neighbour’s, Dr Burnett in Fanchurch-street – which in both points troubles me mightily.

15 June 1665

The town grows very sickly, and people to be afeared of it – there dying this last week of the plague 112, from 43 the week before – whereof, one in Fanchurch-street and one in Broadstreete by the Treasurer’s office.

26 June 1665

The plague encreases mightily- I this day, seeing a house, at a bittmakers over against St Clements church in the open street, shut up; which is a sad sight.

The last entry from 1665 in the Penguin edition I read last night is from 30 June, where Pepys writes:

Myself and family in good health, consisting of myself and wife – Mercer, her woman – Mary, Alice and Su, our maids; and Tom, my boy. In a sickly time, of the plague growing on.

The Diary of Samuel Pepys is online at https://www.pepysdiary.com/and selections from entries mentioning the plague can be found at http://www.pepys.info/1665/plague.html.

 

In Memoriam Pleasures of Past Times

“…for more than thirty years my happiest dreams have been of second-hand bookshops…”

-Graham Greene, 1973, in Reflections, 1991

 

One of my favourite things of London is its second-hand shops. Over the years I’ve developed personal routes where, when I have the time (read: make the time for it) I walk from one to another in a sort of individual pilgrimage often including book shops, record shops, comics shops and other pop culture memorabilia, maps, stamps, all sorts of print and material culture shops.

These establishments (without them necessarily knowing it) become a type of friend, someone you get to know intimately who can offer just the right thing to satisfy a particular need at a given moment in time. This need is not only materialistic or consumerist. It’s not what people call “retail therapy”. It’s more like a type of emotional, spiritual counseling or mentorship- one pays a visit to these shops because they offer, like libraries, serendipitous journeys of discovery. One steps into them often without looking for something very specific in mind- it’s not the item that gets you there but the place itself, its reputation as the consequence of careful or accidental curatorial work. The drive to visit them can be described as a very particular type of physical and intellectual hunger for a special, unexpected artifact waiting for the right collector to appreciate its relative rarity or uniqueness, a star in a constellation with links waiting to be traced, a lost piece in the ever-growing jigsaw puzzle of who we have been and are in the process of becoming.

Over the years I have seen many of these establishments close down. The other day I added another one to my own personal graveyard of closed shops- Pleasures of Past Times (PoPT), on 11 Cecil Court, which had stood in that same location since 1967, as its store sign proudly announced.

How can one explain the feeling of loss when one arrives to a location and finds it empty and closed for good? This feeling can be easily dismissed as conservative, retrograde and dangerous nostalgia. This is not to deny it is a nostalgic feeling: it is, of course, since we are talking about second-hand shops of a particular type, a feeling always-already embedded in nostalgia understood as an ongoing attempt to recover, as collector, what one always wanted and never had, or what one feels deserves appreciation, for one reason or another, beyond its relative obsolescence or even practical meaninglessness in the contemporary world. I’d argue that it’s not necessarily toxic or dangerous to feel a sense of loss when we witness a transformation in the urban landscape, particularly when it is tied to changing paradigms in our relationships to otherwise symbolically meaningful objects that increasingly are thought of as obsolete.

Can such contradictory, complex emotion be entertained or described? Benjamin’s theses on the philosophy of history, his reading of Klee’s Angelus Novus? I feel like there can be a type of critical, self-aware nostalgia that, rather than idealising a mythical past, performs itself as a critique of “progress” disguised as higher rents, the rejection of the symbolic in favour of the strictly practical (estate agents, food and clothes, not print books, music in physical formats or non-digital art) as expressed by the ongoing demystification of material culture, accelerated by the belief that all experience can be digitized, that material objects are clutter, etc. A kind of “progress” defined by an ethos of individualism and isolation: why go anywhere if you can just get it delivered to your own home?

Storefront of Pleasures of Past Times,  11 Cecil Court, London WC2N 4EZ
Pleasures of Past Times, 11 Cecil Court, London WC2N 4EZ, now closed
11 Cecil Court blue plaque, "In a building on this site W.A. Mozart and his family lodged in April-August 1764
11 Cecil Court blue plaque

Checking PoPT’s website I realise it is now only an online shop- which is better than the worse alternative of its total disappearance, and a fate many other similar shops have had of late. The sense of loss for its brick-and-mortar address is not necessarily for the items it used to stock, buy and sell, but for the social, collective, cultural experience it contributed to as part of a bigger formal or informal network of similar shops. I could never afford to spend much money at PoPT, and I must say I used to find it a tad intimidating- my limited budget meant sometimes I just looked at its window and marveled at much stuff I would have loved to add to my collection.

In what could potentially be called today a “psychogeographic” essay titled “Second-hand Bookshops” (1973), Graham Greene describes evocatively his passion for these establishments. “I don’t know how Freud would have interpreted them”, writes Greene in the opening line, “but for more than thirty years my happiest dreams have been of second-hand bookshops” (I personally rarely dream of bookshops, but indeed for more than thirty years my happiest memories include them).

Greene also describes the always-changing landscape of second-hand bookshops in London:

“No, the West End is no longer my hunting ground any more than Charing Cross Road, but, thank God! Cecil Court remains Cecil Court…” (Reflections, 1991).

In a way, Cecil Court still remains Cecil Court. But it is rapidly changing. Without PoPT Cecil Court is, for those of us who have visited it over the years, significantly different- Pleasures of Past Times will be missed as a shop that once made Cecil Court remain Cecil Court.

Addressing Sylvia: A Comic about Sylvia Plath’s Last Address

Panel 5 from Priego, Ernesto (2019): Adressing Sylvia. figshare. Poster. https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.7803530
Panel 5 from Priego, Ernesto (2019): Adressing Sylvia. figshare. Poster. https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.7803530
In early January 2019 I took a walk.
I made a comic about it and shared it on Figshare. (I subsequently did a a new version with a minor revision, and updated the description in the record; the link should take you to the latest version).
Priego, Ernesto (2019): Addressing Sylvia. figshare. Poster. https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.7803530

Pint of Science: Comics, Humans and Technology in the Pub! 16 May 2017

I am pleased to announce I will participate at the following Pint of Science event:

Humans and technology: in life and in death

Tuesday 16 May 2017

Doors open 6.30 PM, Event 7.00 PM – 9.30 PM

The Artillery Arms 102 Bunhill Row,
London EC1Y 8ND

Come along and live it up – it’ll be dead fun.  The function room is on the first floor, with no wheelchair access.

Technology is everywhere. Its involvement in our world changes across the lifespan. This evening will explore some of the ways researchers are applying different technologies as we age. You’ll hear how technology can be used both as we live and as we die. Expert speakers from City, University of London will introduce you to a world of smart homes, virtual rehabilitation and mobile phone autopsies – a world where online comics are being used to make sense of both life and death.

Full programme info and registration at https://pintofscience.co.uk/event/humans-and-technology-in-life-and-in-death-

Hope to see you there!

1:AM London Altmetrics Conference: A #1AMconf Twitter Archive

1:AM  London 2014 logo

I have uploaded a new dataset to figshare:

Priego, Ernesto (2014): 1:AM London Altmetrics Conference: A #1AMconf Twitter Archive .  figshare.
http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.1185443

1:AM London, “the 1st Altmetrics Conference: London”, took place 25th—26th September 2014 at the Wellcome Collection, London, UK.

The  file contains a dataset of 4267 Tweets tagged with #1AMconf (case not sensitive). These Tweets were published publicly and tagged with #1AMconf  between Thursday September 18 17:29:56 +0000 2014 and Sunday September 28 16:07:49 +0000 2014.

Only users with at least 2 followers were included in the archive. Retweets have been included. An initial automatic deduplication was performed but data might require further deduplication. The Time column (D) has times in British Summer Time (BST).

Please go to the file cited above for more information.

 

“Popy!”

From my present:

At the Natural History Museum, London
At the Natural History Museum, London, photo taken 2014-05-25, 16-02-56 BST.

 

From my past:

Página final de "Mundo Perdido", autores desconocidos, con introducción de Georgina Llorente, Compañía General de Ediciones, México, DF, 1979. Página 46. Colección del autor. Fotografía tomada 2014-05-25 20.49.45 BST.
Last page of  “Mundo Perdido”, authors unknown, with an introduction by  Georgina Llorente, Compañía General de Ediciones, México, DF, 1979. Page 46. From the author’s collection. Photo taken 2014-05-25 20.49.45 BST.

Sensational Butterflies

Natural History Museum 2014-05-25 14.09.04
Natural History Museum 2014-05-25 14.09.04 photo CC-BY Ernesto Priego

 

More living creatures

-organisms-

in a teaspoon of soil

than human beings

on Earth.

A butterfly landed

on a girl’s head

fluttering laying

eggs, as the girl’s

mother took photos

and the girl

stood still.

 

To be a butterfly:

the whole life

process for life’s sake

briefly, with its

moments of gruesomeness,

fear and beauty.

All worth it.

#LibPub Sessions 4 & 5: Scholarly Publishing and Reference Books -and comics!

Screen Shot from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Encyclopedia
Screen Shot from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Encyclopedia

I‘ve been so busy I just couldn’t find the time/energy to write a post for the fourth session of our Libraries and Publishing module at #citylis last week. But here I am!

Blogging is a great way of leaving a public register -even if limited- of the module sessions; I also like to feel like we are sharing a little bit of what happens within the four walls of the lecture theatre with other interested parties out there. Blogging therefore is definitely well worth the effort, but sometimes it’s just very hard to do it as regularly as one would like to.

Anyway, our fourth session last week was about scholarly publishing, which is one of my favourite topics. I really enjoyed being able to dedicate a whole session to it. We focused on scholarly publishing in the UK and I aimed at presenting a general picture of academic journal publishing today, what it means and how it generally works, particularly in relation to libraries and users.

We looked at some reasons why libraries cancel journal subscriptions and went over the “serials crisis”, gradually moving towards open access publishing, the different options out there, the differences between editorial workflow, access type and business models; briefly mentioned institutional/national mandates, as well as challenges and opportunities posed by openness, including licensing and atttitudes towards intellectual property.

Gosh Comics London: The Culture of Comics
Gosh Comics London: The Culture of Comics

This week a group of us also did a “research field trip” to two Central London comic book shops, Gosh! Comics and Forbidden Planet. This was an activity related to our third session, on comic book publishing and libraries. Though both shops sell comics they are two completely different establishments, and we went there hoping to get some insights into what different strategies they use to organise, classify and display their stock. We also came out with some nice books! (Thank you to those who came last Tuesday or who visited the shops in other days on your own!).

Gosh! Comics window... The Encyclopedia... #LIbPub everywhere!
Gosh! Comics window… The Encyclopedia… #LIbPub everywhere!

Tomorrow, for session 5, the topic is the past, present and future of reference book publishing. I have preapred two case studies, Palgrave Macmillan and Oxford University Press, to present an overview of how these two major publishers work, focusing specifically on their online products.

We will also have the honour of welcoming Dr Katharine Schopflin who will talk to us about her research in book history on encyclopaedias as a form of the book. Her lecture is titled “Encyclopaedias: publishers, librarians and end-users”, and will provide an overview of the status of the encyclopaedia from its origins to the present, inviting us “to consider whether the encyclopaedia has a generic signature which carries beyond the material form of the book.”

SpotOn London 2013: Interdisciplinary research: what can scientists, humanists and social scientists learn from each other?

Logo Spot On

This year’s SpotOn London conference will take place at the British Library.

I have cancelled my appearance. If I have time I might write a post about it later.

SpotOn is a series of community events for the discussion of how science is carried out and communicated online. The flagship conference is the annual SpotOn London two day event, formerly called Science Online London, and now in its fifth year. They also host monthly SpotOn NYC events in New York City.

This year I’ll be participating in the following workshop:

SpotOn London 2013: Interdisciplinary research: what can scientists, humanists and social scientists learn from each other?
Friday 8 November, 2013 4:30 pm-5:30 pm.

Academics are increasingly turning to interdisciplinary working to maximise the potential of their research. Benefits allegedly include increased access to funding, resources, knowledge and impact (to name but a few) – but how do these partnerships work in real life? What can researchers from polar opposites of the academy learn from each other? And can we ever really get along? This will be an interactive session which will include drafting of a new contract for interdisciplinary scientists, humanist and social scientists.

Coordinator: Dr Philippa Grand (Head of Social Sciences, Palgrave Macmillan, @PalgraveSoc)

Contributors:

  • Dr Simon Bastow, (Senior Research Fellow, LSE Public Policy Group @simonjbastow)
  • Laura Hood (The Conversation, @Lahoo)
  • Des Fitzgerald (Sociologist at Kings College London, @Des_Fitzgerald)
  • Dr Ernesto Priego (Lecturer in Library Science, City University London @ernestopriego)

Session hashtag: #solo13hss