At the LSE Impact of Social Sciences Blog: Publicly available data from Twitter does not constitute an “ethical dilemma”.

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The Impact Blog of the London School of Economics and Political Science has published today my post from yesterday (“Twitter as Public Evidence and the Ethics of Twitter Research”) under the title Publicly available data from Twitter is public evidence and does not constitute an “ethical dilemma”.

With many thanks to Sierra Williams.

At the LSE Impact Blog: “Predatory journals and defective peer review are general academic problems, not just open access problems.”

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Thank you to the LSE Impact of Social Sciences blog for publishing my rebuttal of that Science magazine article on predatory journals. You can read it here: http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/impactofsocialsciences/2013/10/07/whos-afraid-of-open-access/.

At the LSE Impact of Social Sciences Blog: Right to Open Access

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Today the Impact of Social Sciences blog has reblogged my article “The Right to Open Access to Humanities and Social Science Research”, originally published on ORG Zine: the Digital Rights magazine on 7 August 2013.

I am thankful to the LSE Impact blog; they have become an indispensable resource that effectively ensures new (and often considerably larger) audiences for posts written by academics on their own blogs or other online resources. The work of curation and aggregation they do, not only of the ‘content’ but of the audience itself, is unparalleled.

At the LSE Impact blog and Open Access Now

 

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My Altmetric blog post on the LSE Future of Academic Impact conference (7 December 2012) was  published as “Editor’s Choice” at Open Access Now (11 December 2012).

It was also published by the LSE Impact of Social Sciences blog under the title “A new paradigm of scholarly communications is emerging: A report from the Future of Impact conference” (12 December 2012).

With many thanks to both publications and to Altmetric for allowing the reblogging of the piece.

For another report on the LSE event, see Dr David McGillivray’s Storify, “Narrating impacts in the Arts & Humanities” (12 December 2012).