Open Access Futures in the Humanities and Social Sciences; The Conversation

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Today I’m attending the Open Access Futures in the Humanities and Social Sciences event at Senate House, University of London. It is an event organised by SAGE and the London School of Economics in association with the British Academy and Academy of Social Sciences. The hashtag for the conference is #HSSOA.

As I reporter here earlier this week, my article  “Open Access: Towards Fairer Access to Research” is up on the Impact of Social Sciences blog and it is also included in the printed collection that will be made available today at the conference.

As you may know this week has been international Open Access Week. Last night The Conversation UK  published a piece by me in their “Hard Evidence” section, which they titled “Is open access working?“.

At the LSE Impact Blog: Towards Fairer Access to Research

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My piece “Open Access: Towards Fairer Access to Research” is up on the Impact of Social Sciences blog.

There I argue that practical and sustainable ways of increasing access to scholarly materials will require a more thorough transformation of the entire academic landscape, which includes publication, assessment and promotion.

I reused two previous blog posts to emphasise yet again that ultimately, open access advocates are fighting for the right of scholars at all career stages to ensure their work has more prospects of getting read, cited and ‘reused’. I believe that the role of early career scholars in adopting open access is essential if the model is to have a sustainable future.

This piece will also appear in the eCollection in for the Open Access Futures in the Humanities and Social Sciences conference on Thursday 24 October 2013 in Senate House, University of London. Printed copies will be available as well as electronic versions then.

 More information on the collection and the conference is available here:

http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/impactofsocialsciences/2013/10/16/open-access-perspectives-collection/

At the LSE Impact Blog: “Predatory journals and defective peer review are general academic problems, not just open access problems.”

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Thank you to the LSE Impact of Social Sciences blog for publishing my rebuttal of that Science magazine article on predatory journals. You can read it here: http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/impactofsocialsciences/2013/10/07/whos-afraid-of-open-access/.

At LSE Impact of Scoial Sciences: Alt-metrics, Digital Opportunity and Africa

Social Sciences blog bannerToday the LSE Impact of Social Sciences blog republished my “Alt-metrics, Digital Opportunity and Africa” Altmetric blog post. You can read it here.

Many thanks to the editorial team of the LSE Impact blog for republishing the piece and therefore opening it up to a different audience, and to Altmetric for having commissioned the original post.

At the LSE Impact blog and Open Access Now

 

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My Altmetric blog post on the LSE Future of Academic Impact conference (7 December 2012) was  published as “Editor’s Choice” at Open Access Now (11 December 2012).

It was also published by the LSE Impact of Social Sciences blog under the title “A new paradigm of scholarly communications is emerging: A report from the Future of Impact conference” (12 December 2012).

With many thanks to both publications and to Altmetric for allowing the reblogging of the piece.

For another report on the LSE event, see Dr David McGillivray’s Storify, “Narrating impacts in the Arts & Humanities” (12 December 2012).