The Lockdown Chronicles 18: Walt

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Walt sits and looks out.
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Walt Whitman (May 31, 1819 – March 26, 1892) was an American poet, essayist, and journalist. A humanist, he was a part of the transition between transcendentalism and realism, incorporating both views in his works. After suffering a paralytic stroke in early 1873, Whitman was induced to move from Washington to the home of his brother—George Washington Whitman, an engineer—at 431 Stevens Street in Camden, New Jersey. While in residence there he was very productive, publishing three versions of Leaves of Grass among other works. [Wikipedia entry] You can read Leaves of Grass in its entirety via The Walt Whitman Archive.

Source texts: Whitman, Walt (1819 – 1892), “I Sit and Look Out”, from Leaves of Grass (1891–92), via The Walt Whitman Archive, CC BY-NC-SA 3.0; “New Jersey is now reporting more virus deaths per day than New York” in “New York Closes Schools Through End of Academic Year” (1 May 2020), New York. The New York Times;  Benner, Katie (April 13 2020) “Inmates at N.J. Women’s Prison Endured Years of Sex Abuse, Justice Dept. Finds”, Politics. The New York Times; MacFarquhar, Neil (May 3 2020), “The Coronavirus Becomes a Battle Cry for U.S. Extremists”. U.S: The New York Times, © 2020 NYTCo.

Source images: Panel 1: The Walt Whitman House in Camden, NJ (2007), via Wikimedia Commons; Public Domain. Panel 2: Portrait of Walt Whitman taken at Mathew Brady’s studio in Washington, D.C. between 1865 and 1867, wet plate negative, U.S. National Archives 111-B-1672; National Archives Flickr, Unrestricted Use. This comic strip CC-BY-NC-SA.

 

References

Whitman, Walt (1891–92), “I Sit and Look Out”,  from Leaves of Grass, via The Walt Whitman Archive, Gen. ed. Ed Folsom and Kenneth M. Price. Available at https://whitmanarchive.org/published/LG/1891/poems/129 [Accessed 3 May 2020]

“New Jersey is now reporting more virus deaths per day than New York” in “New York Closes Schools Through End of Academic Year” (1 May 2020), New York. The New York Times; available at https://www.nytimes.com/2020/05/01/nyregion/coronavirus-new-york-update.html [Accessed 3 May 2020]

Benner, Katie (13 April 2020) “Inmates at N.J. Women’s Prison Endured Years of Sex Abuse, Justice Dept. Finds”, Politics. The New York Times; available at https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/13/us/politics/prisons-civil-rights-justice-department.html  [Accessed 3 May 2020]

MacFarquhar, Neil (3 May 2020), “The Coronavirus Becomes a Battle Cry for U.S. Extremists”. U.S: The New York Times, available at https://www.nytimes.com/2020/05/03/us/coronavirus-extremists.html  [Accessed 3 May 2020]

Pavlovitz, John (1 May 2020) “The White Privilege to Terrorize”. Available at https://johnpavlovitz.com/2020/05/01/the-white-privilege-to-terrorize/ [Accessed 3 May 2020]

Price, Kenneth M. (2011) ‘“Whitman, Walt, Clerk”. The Poet Was a Seer of Democracy and Bureaucracy’. National Archives Prologue Magazine, Winter 2011, Vol. 43, No. 4, available at https://www.archives.gov/publications/prologue/2011/winter/whitman.html [Accessed 3 May 2020]

The Walt Whitman House in Camden, NJ (2007), via Wikimedia Commons; Public Domain, available at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walt_Whitman#/media/File:WhitmanHouse-CamdenNJ1.jpg [Accessed 3 May 2020]

Portrait of Walt Whitman taken at Mathew Brady’s studio in Washington, D.C. between 1865 and 1867; wet plate negative; U.S. National Archives 111-B-1672; National Archives Flickr; available at https://www.flickr.com/photos/35740357@N03/4222278143/ [Accessed 3 May 2020]

Portrait of Walt Whitman taken at Mathew Brady’s studio in Washington, D.C.; wet plate negative; purchased from Brady for the U.S. National Archives in 1873, via The Walt Whitman Archive, available at https://whitmanarchive.org/multimedia/image022.html [Accessed 3 May 2020]

The Lockdown Chronicles is a series of periodical comic strips made at night (in candlelight!) adapting and reusing openly-licensed or public domain items from online digital collections. Publication and tweetage are scheduled in advance. Historical sources are adapted and updated for the current pandemic; please refer to each strip’s references on each post for further context.  Catch up with the series at https://epriego.blog/tag/the-lockdown-chronicles/.