The Lockdown Chronicles 30: Eric

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Eric is a newsreader.
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Eric Arthur Blair (1903–1950), better known by his pen name George Orwell, fled London’s smog for Jura on 10 April 1947 mostly for health reasons, where he worked on Nineteen Eighty-Four (1949). During that period he would be diagnosed with tuberculosis (Taylor 2003) [Wikipedia entry]

The masses never revolt of their own accord, and they never revolt merely because they are oppressed. Indeed, so long as they are not permitted to have standards of comparison, they never even become aware that they are oppressed. The recurrent economic crises of past times were totally unnecessary and are not now permitted to happen, but other and equally large dislocations can and do happen without having political results, because there is no way in which discontent can become articulate.”

-George Orwell, Nineteen Eighty-Four (1949)

Text sources: Taylor, D.J. (2003) Orwell: The Life. Henry Holt and Company; Sabbagh, D., Perraudin, F., Stewart, H., and Walker, P. (20 May 2020) “UK plans for contact-tracing in doubt as app not ready until June”. The Guardian; Hawkins, R (20 May 2020) “Coronavirus: Serco apologises for sharing contact tracers’ email addresses”. BBC Radio 4 Today. BBC News;  Perraudin, F. (20 May 2020) “No one had any idea’: Contact tracers lack knowledge about Covid-19 job”. The Guardian; Culnane, C., and Teague, V. (19 May 2020) Security analysis of the NHS COVID-19 App, StateofIT.

Source image: photograph of George Orwell at the BBC, photographer unknown, 1940, via Wikimedia Commons. Public Domain. This comic strip CC-BY-NC-SA.

 

References

Taylor, D.J. (2003) Orwell: The Life. Henry Holt and Company

Orwell, G. (1949) Nineteen Eighty-Four, via Internet Archive, available at https://archive.org/details/Orwell1984preywo/mode/2up [Accessed 20 May 2020]

Culnane, C., and Teague, V. (19 May 2020) Security analysis of the NHS COVID-19 App, available via  https://www.stateofit.com/UKContactTracing/ [Accessed 20 May 2020]

Sabbagh, D., Perraudin, F., Stewart, H., and Walker, P. (20 May 2020) “UK plans for contact-tracing in doubt as app not ready until June”. The Guardian; available at https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/may/20/uk-plans-for-contact-tracing-in-doubt-as-app-not-ready-until-june [Accessed 20 May 2020]

Hawkins, R (20 May 2020) “Coronavirus: Serco apologises for sharing contact tracers’ email addresses”. BBC Radio 4 Today. BBC News; available at https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-52732818# [Accessed 20 May 2020]

Perraudin, F. (20 May 2020) “No one had any idea’: Contact tracers lack knowledge about Covid-19 job”. The Guardian; available at https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/may/20/no-one-had-any-idea-contact-tracers-lack-knowledge-about-covid-19-job [Accessed 20 May 2020]

Photograph of George Orwell at the BBC, photographer unknown, 1940, via Wikimedia Commons, available at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Orwell#/media/File:George-orwell-BBC.jpg [Accessed 20 May 2020]

 

The Lockdown Chronicles is a series of periodical comic strips made at night (in candlelight!) adapting and reusing openly-licensed or public domain items from online digital collections. Publication and tweetage are scheduled in advance. Historical sources are adapted and updated for the current pandemic; please refer to each strip’s references on each post for further context.  Catch up with the series at https://epriego.blog/tag/the-lockdown-chronicles/.

The Lockdown Chronicles 29: Mary Jane

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Mary Jane wanted to be a nurse.
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Mary Seacole (née Mary Jane Grant, 1805, Kingston, Jamaica – 1881, London, UK), businesswoman who provided sustenance and care for British soldiers at the battlefront during the Crimean War. Despite her nursing experience during a cholera epidemic in Panama and in Jamaica caring for yellow fever victims, her offers to serve as an army nurse were refused. She attributed her rejection to racial prejudice (Seacole 1857: 74-80). After her death she fell into obscurity but in 2004 took first place in the 100 Great Black Britons poll in the UK. [Wikipedia entry] [Britannica entry]

In a 2014 letter to the Guardian, Professor Lynn McDonald, editor of the Collected Works of Florence Nightingale, wrote of Seacole that “[y]es, she was kind and generous, to ordinary soldiers as well as officers. These are good qualities, but not the sort that saves lives or pioneers health care” (Monday 27 October 2014).

It seems to me, as a humble reader, that all these years after her death Mary Seacole keeps suffering from the rejection she described experiencing in her 1857 autobiography (see chapter VIII).

Text sources: Syal, R. (18 May 2020) “Points-based UK immigration bill passes initial Commons stage”. The Guardian; Sparrow, A., Murphy, S. and Perraudin, F. (19 May 2020) “UK coronavirus live: excess deaths reached almost 55,000 in early May, says ONS”. The Guardian; Sample, I. (18 May 2020) “Over three-quarters of BAME doctors fear they will contract Covid-19”. The Guardian; Seacole, M. (2003)[1857] Wonderful Adventures of Mrs. Seacole in Many Lands, via Project Gutenberg.

Source image: Photograph of Mary Seacole c. 1873, unknown photographer, Maull & Company London, in the public domain in its country of origin and other countries and areas where the copyright term is the author’s life plus 70 years or fewer, via Wikimedia Commons. This comic strip CC-BY-NC-SA.

References

Syal, R. (18 May 2020) “Points-based UK immigration bill passes initial Commons stage”. The Guardian; https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2020/may/18/points-based-uk-immigration-bill-passed-by-parliament [Accessed 19 May 2020].

Sparrow, A., Murphy, S. and Perraudin, F. (19 May 2020) “UK coronavirus live: excess deaths reached almost 55,000 in early May, says ONS”. The Guardian; Available at https://www.theguardian.com/world/live/2020/may/19/uk-coronavirus-live-latest-updates [Accessed 19 May 2020].

Sample, I. (18 May 2020) “Over three-quarters of BAME doctors fear they will contract Covid-19”. The Guardian; Available at https://www.theguardian.com/society/2020/may/18/over-three-quarters-of-bame-doctors-fear-they-will-contract-covid-19 [Accessed 19 May 2020].

Seacole, M. (2003)[1857] Wonderful Adventures of Mrs. Seacole in Many Lands, via Project Gutenberg. Available at http://www.gutenberg.org/files/23031/23031-h/23031-h.htm [Accessed 19 May 2020].

Photograph of Mary Seacole c.1873, unknown photographer, Maull & Company London, via Wikimedia Commons, available at https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Seacole_photo.jpg [Accessed 19 May 2020].

The Lockdown Chronicles is a series of periodical comic strips made at night (in candlelight!) adapting and reusing openly-licensed or public domain items from online digital collections. Publication and tweetage are scheduled in advance. Historical sources are adapted and updated for the current pandemic; please refer to each strip’s references on each post for further context.  Catch up with the series at https://epriego.blog/tag/the-lockdown-chronicles/.

The Lockdown Chronicles 22: W.G.

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W.G. is a doctor in Bristol.
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Note: the phrase “it’s just not cricket” is used in English to say that something is unfair or dishonest.

An outstanding all-rounder, William Gilbert “W. G.” Grace MRCS LRCP (18 July 1848 – 23 October 1915) was a an English amateur cricketer and a doctor. He obtained his medical diploma from the University of Edinburgh and qualified as a Licentiate of the Royal College of Physicians (LRCP) and became a Member of the Royal College of Surgeons (MRCS). After qualifying he worked at 61 Stapleton Road in Easton, Bristol, employing two locums during the cricket season. He was the local Public Vaccinator and had additional duties as the Medical Officer to the Barton Regis Union, which involved tending patients in the workhouse (Rae 1998).

W.G. Grace was important in the development of cricket and is widely considered one of its greatest-ever players. Generally known as “W. G.”, he played first-class cricket for a record-equaling 44 seasons, from 1865 to 1908, during which he captained England, Gloucestershire, the Gentlemen, Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC), the United South of England Eleven (USEE) and several other teams. Right-handed as both batsman and bowler, Grace dominated the sport during his career. His technical innovations and enormous influence left a lasting legacy. [Wikipedia entry]

Text sources: Rae, Simon (1998) W. G. Grace: A Life. Faber; Boobyer, Leigh (7 May 2020) “Two-thirds of COVID-19 patients in Gloucestershire’s two main hospitals discharged”, Gloucestershire Live; Campbell, Denis et al (5 May 2020) “Calls for inquiry as UK reports highest Covid-19 death toll in Europe”, The Guardian; Rawlinson, Kevin (7 May 2020) “Coronavirus PPE: all 400,000 gowns flown from Turkey for NHS fail UK standards”. The Guardian.

Source image: portrait of W. G. Grace, Woodburytype, late 1880s, by Herbert Rose Barraud (1845-1896), via Wikimedia Commons, Public Domain. This comic strip CC-BY-NC-SA.

References

Booth, Lawrence, editor (2020) Wisden Cricketers’ Almanack 2020, Wisden, available to buy from https://www.wisden.com/ [Accessed 7 May 2020]

ECB (30 April 2020) “Cricket and COVID-19: your questions answered”, available from https://www.ecb.co.uk/news/1657168/cricket-and-covid-19-your-questions-answered [Accessed 7 May 2020]

Rae, Simon (1998) W. G. Grace: A Life. Faber, available to buy from https://www.faber.co.uk/9780571195732-w-g-grace-a-life.html [Accessed 7 May 2020]

Boobyer, Leigh (7 May 2020) “Two-thirds of COVID-19 patients in Gloucestershire’s two main hospitals discharged”, Gloucestershire Live. Available from https://www.gloucestershirelive.co.uk/news/health/two-thirds-covid-19-patients-4112573  [Accessed 7 May 2020]

Campbell, Denis et al (5 May 2020) “Calls for inquiry as UK reports highest Covid-19 death toll in Europe”, The Guardian. Available from https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/may/05/uk-coronavirus-death-toll-rises-above-32000-to-highest-in-europe [Accessed 7 May 2020]

Rawlinson, Kevin (7 May 2020) “Coronavirus PPE: all 400,000 gowns flown from Turkey for NHS fail UK standards”. The Guardian. Available from https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/may/07/all-400000-gowns-flown-from-turkey-for-nhs-fail-uk-standards [Accessed 7 May 2020]

Barraud, Herbert Rose (late 1880s)  Portrait of W. G. Grace, cricketeer,  Woodburytype, via Wikimedia Commons, available at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/W._G._Grace#/media/File:W._G._Grace,_cricketer,_by_Herbert_Rose_Barraud.jpg [Accessed 7 May 2020]

 

The Lockdown Chronicles is a series of periodical comic strips made at night (in candlelight!) adapting and reusing openly-licensed or public domain items from online digital collections. Publication and tweetage are scheduled in advance. Historical sources are adapted and updated for the current pandemic; please refer to each strip’s references on each post for further context.  Catch up with the series at https://epriego.blog/tag/the-lockdown-chronicles/.

The Lockdown Chronicles 14: Virginia

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Work, even in poverty and obscurity, is worth while.”

– Virginia Woolf, A Room of One’s Own (1929)

 

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Virginia said she would order the flowers herself.
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Adeline Virginia Woolf ( 25 January 1882 – 28 March 1941) was an English writer, considered one of the most important modernist 20th-century authors. Her novel Mrs Dalloway (1925) and her essay  A Room of One’s Own (1929) (in which she wrote the much-quoted dictum, “A woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction”) are among her best-known works. [Wikipedia Entry].

Source text: Panel 1: BBC News. 28 April 2020. “Coronavirus: Remembering 100 NHS and healthcare workers who have died”. bbc.co.uk; Woolf, Virginia (1925) Mrs. Dalloway, text via Project Gutenberg of Australia; panels 2 and 4: Woolf, Virginia (1935) [1929] A Room of One’s Own, text via Project Gutenberg of Australia; both originally published in London by Hogarth Press.

Source image: Photograph of Virginia Woolf aged 20, (January 25, 1882 – March 28, 1941) by George Charles Beresford (10 July 1864 – 21 February 1938), via Wikimedia Commons. Public Domain. This comic strip CC-BY-NC-SA.

 

References

BBC News (28 April 2020). “Coronavirus: Remembering 100 NHS and healthcare workers who have died”. Available at https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-52242856# [accessed 28 April 2020]

Woolf, Virginia (1925) Mrs. Dalloway, text via Project Gutenberg of Australia: http://gutenberg.net.au/ebooks02/0200991h.html [accessed 28 April 2020]

Woolf, Virginia (1935) [1929] A Room of One’s Own, text via Project Gutenberg of Australia: http://gutenberg.net.au/ebooks02/0200791.txt [accessed 28 April 2020]

A Room of One’s Own by Virginia Woolf. Book. Collection Items. The British Library. Available at https://www.bl.uk/collection-items/a-room-of-ones-own-by-virginia-woolf [accessed 28 April 2020]

Bradshaw, David (25 May 2016). “Mrs Dalloway and the First World War”. The British Library. Available at https://www.bl.uk/20th-century-literature/articles/mrs-dalloway-and-the-first-world-war [accessed 28 April 2020]

Bowlby, Rachel (25 May 2016). “An introduction to A Room of One’s Own” Available at https://www.bl.uk/20th-century-literature/articles/an-introduction-to-a-room-of-ones-own  [accessed 28 April 2020]

George Charles Beresford – Virginia Woolf in 1902. Wikimedia Commons. Available at https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:George_Charles_Beresford_-_Virginia_Woolf_in_1902_-_Restoration.jpg [accessed 28 April 2020]

 

P.S. Needless to say the National Portrait Gallery, London, has an extraordinary online collection of digitised Virginia Woolf portraits in their collection. However their licensing impedes derivatives (why?!) so  my only option was to use the Wikimedia Commons version.  [If you read all the way here thank you- you are my ideal reader!].

The Lockdown Chronicles is a series of periodical comic strips made at night (in candlelight!) adapting and reusing openly-licensed or public domain items from online digital collections. Publication and tweetage are scheduled in advance. Historical sources are adapted and updated for the current pandemic; please refer to each strip’s references on each post for further context.  Catch up with the series at https://epriego.blog/tag/the-lockdown-chronicles/.

The Lockdown Chronicles 11: Gertrude

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Gertrude is a nurse in Manchester.
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With huge respect and gratitude for all the medical staff worldwide.

Gertrude Mary Giltinan (1881-1919) joined the Other Empire Force as a Voluntary Aid Detachment on the Joint War Committee and worked at the 2nd General Hospital in Manchester. A month after Gertrude signed up as a VAD, the influenza pandemic had reached an acute stage in Manchester. Gertrude died on the 19th November 1919 aged 38, from Spanish flu and subsequent pneumonia, which she contracted while nursing her patients. [Alice Low, Florence Nightingale Museum leaflet].

Text adapted from:  Low, Alice (2018) “Gertrude Giltinan (1881-1919)”, Nursing during WWI and the 1918 Influenza Pandemic, volunteer research leaflet, ©Florence Nightingale Museum; Blakey, Ashley, (20 April 2020), “Another 64 people lose their lives to Coronavirus in Greater Manchester”, Manchester Evening News; the Guardian Picture Essay (20 April 2020) “On the frontline: meet the NHS workers tackling coronavirus”; Marsh, Sarah (22 April 2020) “Doctors, nurses, porters, volunteers: the UK health workers who have died from Covid-19”, the Guardian.

Source images: Panel 1: Nicholls Hospital, Manchester, England. Transfer lithograph, 1879, after T. Worthington. Wellcome Images, Wellcome Collection. CC-BY 4.0; Panels 2-4: Photograph of Gertrude Giltinan, Voluntary Aid Detachments. Died of influenza contracted on duty 19 November 1919, WWC H2-169, Imperial War Museum, ©IWM, IWM Non-Commercial Licence. This comic strip CC-BY-NC-SA.

References

Florence Nightingale Museum, London (September 2018 to January 2020), “Spanish Flu: Nursing during history’s deadliest pandemic”. Available at https://www.florence-nightingale.co.uk/spanish-flu-nursing-during-historys-deadliest-pandemic/ [Accessed 22 April 2020]

Low, Alice (2018) “Gertrude Giltinan (1881-1919)”, Nursing during WWI and the 1918 Influenza Pandemic, volunteer research leaflet, Florence Nightingale Museum. Available as PDF at https://www.florence-nightingale.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/hlf-volunteer-research-leaflet.pdf [Accessed 22 April 2020]

Blakey, Ashley (20 April 2020), “Another 64 people lose their lives to Coronavirus in Greater Manchester”, Manchester Evening News. Available at https://www.manchestereveningnews.co.uk/news/greater-manchester-news/coronavirus-death-toll-greater-manchester-18119590 [Accessed 22 April 2020]

Elgot, Jessica (25 September 2015) “Police apologise for using sirens to settle ‘woo-woo’ or ‘nee-nah’ debate”. The Guardian. Available at
https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2015/sep/25/police-apologise-for-using-sirens-to-settle-woo-woo-or-nee-nah-debate [Accessed 22 April 2020]

The Guardian Picture Essay (20 April 2020) “On the frontline: meet the NHS workers tackling coronavirus”. Available at https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/apr/20/nhs-frontline-meet-people-risking-lives-tackle-coronavirus  [Accessed 22 April 2020]

Marsh, Sarah (22 April 2020) “Doctors, nurses, porters, volunteers: the UK health workers who have died from Covid-19”, the Guardian. Available at https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/apr/16/doctors-nurses-porters-volunteers-the-uk-health-workers-who-have-died-from-covid-19   [Accessed 22 April 2020]

Nicholls Hospital, Manchester, England. Transfer lithograph, 1879, after T. Worthington. Wellcome Images, Wellcome Collection. Available at https://wellcomecollection.org/works/n8urd46p/items?canvas=1&langCode=eng   [Accessed 22 April 2020]

Photograph of Gertrude Giltinan, Voluntary Aid Detachments. Died of influenza contracted on duty 19 November 1919, WWC H2-169, Imperial War Museum. Available at  https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205380418 [Accessed 22 April 2020]

 

The Lockdown Chronicles is a series of periodical comic strips made at night (in candlelight!) adapting and reusing openly-licensed or public domain items from online digital collections. Publication and tweetage are scheduled in advance. Historical sources are adapted and updated for the current pandemic; please refer to each strip’s references on each post for further context.  Catch up with the series at https://epriego.blog/tag/the-lockdown-chronicles/.