Comics as COVID-19 Response: Now Deposited ‘Green’ Open Access

Art by Peter Wilkins; Editing by Ernesto Priego (2020)
Art by Peter Wilkins; Editing by Ernesto Priego (2020) https://doi.org/10.25383/city.12348959.v1

 

Unfortunately it’s not always possible to publish all of one’s academic work as open access versions of record. In those cases the least one can do in my opinion is ensure one keeps one’s copyright and that the publisher allows legal self-archiving without an embargo. (If in doubt, check before submitting: https://v2.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/).

My article with Peter Wilkins, “Comics as COVID-19 Response: Visualising the Experience of Video-conferencing with Ageing Relatives” was published on Friday June 12 2020 in the COVID-19 response blog section of ACM Interactions Magazine (see our announcement on this blog here).

We are pleased the article will also be featured in the print version of the magazine in the June-July issue. Once again our gratitude to the editors!

ACM Interactions is published bi-monthly by the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) and the licensing agreement allows for Green Open Access without embargo.

We have deposited the accepted manuscript (adding an abstract to facilitate discovery and archiving) in City Research Online and can be downloaded from https://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/24428/

The comic we discussed was published open access on figshare as

Wilkins, Peter; Priego, Ernesto (2020): A Comic Visualising the Experience of Video-conferencing with Aging Parents During the COVID-19 Pandemic. City, University of London. Figure. https://doi.org/10.25383/city.12348959.v1

The published version of the article is online at at https://interactions.acm.org/blog/view/comics-as-covid-19-response-visualizing-the-experience-of-videoconferencing.

We did explore getting the funding to pay for the Open Access option at the ACM, but since ACM Interactions is not a peer reviewed publication and the cost is far from negligible we decided to be strategic in this instance and save the funds for, hopefully, a future peer-reviewed publication, if need be.

The path towards wider fully-fledged openness in research is a long and convoluted one. It shouldn’t have to be.

This was 2019 in The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship (Vol. 9)

Comics Grid logo

It’s that time of the year and at The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship we are closing our 9th volume, corresponding to 2019. We are getting ready for the holidays and next year.

Here’s a listing of the articles we published during 2019 by section:

Research

Lipenga, K.J., 2019. The New Normal: Enfreakment in Saga. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.2. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.161

Davies, P.F., 2019. New Choices of the Comics Creator. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.3. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.153

Grant, P., 2019. The Board and the Body: Material Constraints and Style in Graphic Narrative. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.4. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.145

del Rey Cabero, E., 2019. Beyond Linearity: Holistic, Multidirectional, Multilinear and Translinear Reading in Comics. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.5. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.137

McGovern, M. and Eve, M.P., 2019. Information Labour and Shame in Farmer and Chevli’s Abortion Eve. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.6. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.158

Hornsby, I., 2019. …Comic Books, Möbius Strips, Philosophy and…. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.7. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.151

Pickering, T., 2019. Diabetes Year One. Drawing my Pathography: Comics, Poetry and the Medical Self. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.8. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.147

Hagan, R.J., 2019. Touch Me/Don’t Touch Me: Representations of Female Archetypes in Ann Nocenti’s Daredevil. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.9. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.148

Misemer, L., 2019. A Historical Approach to Webcomics: Digital Authorship in the Early 2000s. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.10. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.162

Tan, X., 2019. Guoxue Comics: Visualising Philosophical Concepts and Cultural Values through Sequential Narratives. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.11. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.149

Austin, H.J., 2019. “That Old Black Magic”: Noir and Music in Juan Díaz Canales and Juanjo Guarnido’s Blacksad. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.12. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.156

Kottas, L. and Schwarzenbacher, M., 2019. The Comic at the Crossroads: The Semiotics of ‘Voodoo Storytelling’ in The Hole: Consumer Culture Vol. 1. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.13. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.150

Dodds, N., 2019. The Practice of Authentication: Adapting Pilgrimage from Nenthead into a Graphic Memoir. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.14. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.154

Manouach, I., 2019. Peanuts minus Schulz: Distributed Labor as a Compositional Practice. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.16. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.139

D’Arcy, J., 2019. Troubling Boundaries and Negotiating Dominant Culture: Fun Home as a Transmedial Text. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.17. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.146

Review

Evans, J., 2019. Challenging Adaptation Studies: A Review of Comics and Adaptation. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.1. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.159

Commentary

Christmas, S., 2019. The Citi Exhibition Manga マンガ (British Museum, 2019). The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.15. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.181

Creating Comics, Creative Comics

As you can see from the list above for us in the journal our 9th volume had a strong focus on the Special Collection: Creating Comics, Creative Comics.

The collection expanded on the themes of the symposium held in June 2018 at the University of South Wales, Cardiff.

Edited by Geraint D’Arcy (University of South Wales), Brian Fagence (University of South Wales) and Yours Truly (City, University of London), this collection sought to explore the dilemmas and potentials of construction and creation, ideology and authorship, philosophies and embodiment, histories and practices. It’s been both a pleasure and an honour to collaborate with Geraint and Brian and all the authors and reviewers. An editorial rounding up the collection is forthcoming next year.

Articles published in this collection were listed at https://www.comicsgrid.com/collections/special/creating-comics-creative-comics/.

Contribute

The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship seeks scholarly submissions on the technical, theoretical, cultural, and historical aspects of comics studies that gives vitality to the form and challenges readers’ assumptions about it.

Our current call for papers was published on 30th October 2019 on the journal web site and it is available to download as a PDF from figshare:

Priego, E.; Wilkins, P.; Dunley, K. (2019): The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship: Call for Papers 2019-2020. City, University of London. Online resource. https://doi.org/10.25383/city.10100252.v1

If you are interested in submitting work for review or you just want to find out more about the journal, or catch up with all our previous volumes, please do click on https://www.comicsgrid.com/!

It must be said again: the Journal is only possible because of the work volunteered by our editors, reviewers and authors: thank you all!

I would also like to thank the Open Library of Humanities (https://www.openlibhums.org/) for their ongoing support: without their funding we wouldn’t be able to do what we do.

We always need academic reviewers. If you would like to become a peer reviewer, please register, including enough details of your areas of expertise, at https://www.comicsgrid.com/author/register/reviewer/.

Wishing you all a very happy Christmas and an excellent new year 2020! Looking forward to The Comics Grid’s 10th volume!

Now Receiving Full-Text Submissions. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship: Call for Papers 2019-2020

The Comics Grid logo

I am very glad to share here that The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship is open for submissions once again.

Our Call for Papers 2019-2020 for our tenth volume includes detailed information about the scope of the call, our selection, editorial and peer review processes, authorship attribution guidelines,  information on copyright and licensing and archiving information.

I would like to emphasise the following section of the Call:

We invite energetic writing that is theoretically and interpretively bold. While academic rigour, the inclusion and close discussion of images and citational correctness are important to us as a precondition, a key feature our editors and reviewers will consider is the argument, the discovery, the evidence-based eureka moments conveyed in economical, precise, and, ideally, subtle prose. We believe academic writing about comics should be as striking and immediate as the medium itself.”

I have published our Call for Papers 2019-2020 in the Humanities Commons CORE repository. Metadata below.

The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship: Call for Papers 2019-2020

Author(s):
Kathleen Dunley, Ernesto Priego , Peter Wilkins
Date:
2019
Group(s):
Comics Scholarship/Comics Studies, Digital Humanists, Medical Humanities
Subject(s):
Comics studies, Publishing, Research, Media studies, Comics, Graphic novels, Popular culture, Visual culture
Item Type:
Online publication
Tag(s):
Digital Comics
Permanent URL:
http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/jwm3-9k54
Abstract:
The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship seeks scholarly submissions on the technical, theoretical, cultural, and historical aspects of comics studies that gives vitality to the form and challenges readers’ assumptions about it. This document is the full call for papers published on 30th October 2019 on the journal web site.

This was January-August 2019 at The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship

Comics Grid logo

Here’s a listing of the articles we have published so far in 2019 in the journal (our 9th volume!) until the 30th of August 2019.

Research

Lipenga, K.J., 2019. The New Normal: Enfreakment in Saga. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.2. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.161

Davies, P.F., 2019. New Choices of the Comics Creator. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.3. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.153

Grant, P., 2019. The Board and the Body: Material Constraints and Style in Graphic Narrative. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.4. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.145

del Rey Cabero, E., 2019. Beyond Linearity: Holistic, Multidirectional, Multilinear and Translinear Reading in Comics. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.5. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.137

McGovern, M. and Eve, M.P., 2019. Information Labour and Shame in Farmer and Chevli’s Abortion Eve. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.6. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.158

Hornsby, I., 2019. …Comic Books, Möbius Strips, Philosophy and…. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.7. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.151

Pickering, T., 2019. Diabetes Year One. Drawing my Pathography: Comics, Poetry and the Medical Self. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.8. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.147

Hagan, R.J., 2019. Touch Me/Don’t Touch Me: Representations of Female Archetypes in Ann Nocenti’s Daredevil. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.9. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.148

Misemer, L., 2019. A Historical Approach to Webcomics: Digital Authorship in the Early 2000s. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.10. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.162

Tan, X., 2019. Guoxue Comics: Visualising Philosophical Concepts and Cultural Values through Sequential Narratives. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.11. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.149

Austin, H.J., 2019. “That Old Black Magic”: Noir and Music in Juan Díaz Canales and Juanjo Guarnido’s Blacksad. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.12. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.156

Kottas, L. and Schwarzenbacher, M., 2019. The Comic at the Crossroads: The Semiotics of ‘Voodoo Storytelling’ in The Hole: Consumer Culture Vol. 1. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.13. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.150 

Dodds, N., 2019. The Practice of Authentication: Adapting Pilgrimage from Nenthead into a Graphic Memoir. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.14. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.154

Review

Evans, J., 2019. Challenging Adaptation Studies: A Review of Comics and Adaptation. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.1. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.159

Commentary

Christmas, S., 2019. The Citi Exhibition Manga マンガ (British Museum, 2019). The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.15. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.181

Creating Comics, Creative Comics

As you can see from the list above for us in the journal this year has had a strong focus on the Special Collection: Creating Comics, Creative Comics.

The collection expands on the themes of the symposium held in June 2018 at the University of South Wales, Cardiff.

Edited by Geraint D’Arcy (University of South Wales),  Brian Fagence (University of South Wales) and Yours Truly (City, University of London), this collection seeks to explore the dilemmas and potentials of construction and creation, ideology and authorship, philosophies and embodiment, histories and practices. It’s been both a pleasure and an honour to collaborate with Geraint and Brian and all the authors and reviewers.

Articles published in this collection are listed at https://www.comicsgrid.com/collections/special/creating-comics-creative-comics/ .

More articles to come!

Please note that we are currently closed for submissions until 1st November 2019. Please keep an eye on Twitter and our journal web site for news. We are currently working in drafting our new Call for Papers with revised guidelines.

If you are interested in submitting work for review or you just want to find out more about the journal, or catch up with all our previous volumes, please do click on https://www.comicsgrid.com/!

We always need academic reviewers. If you would like to become a peer reviewer, please register, including enough details of your areas of expertise, at https://www.comicsgrid.com/author/register/reviewer/.

 

Oligopolies of Knowledge, {Digital Humanities} and Open Access: Looking at Scopus from the Global South… [form the North]

Oligopolies of Knowledge, {Digital Humanities} and Open Access: Looking at Scopus from the Global South… [form the North]

 

To download and cite the slides: Priego, Ernesto (2019): Oligopolies of Knowledge, {Digital Humanities} and Open Access: Looking at Scopus from the Global South… [form the North]. figshare. Presentation. https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.8850863

Presentation for P-11: Society, Media, Politics, Engagement Time: Wednesday, 10/Jul/2019: 4:00pm – 5:30pm Session Chair: Amelia Sanz DH2019 Conference, Utrecht, the Netherlands. Location: Pandora Zaal Part of the panel: Twining Digital Humanities and Humanidades Digitales: A set of actual experiences from the South.

All the slides from the panel can be viewed and/or downloaded and cited from:

Fiormonte, Domenico; Numerico, Teresa; Priego, Ernesto; Rodríguez-ortega, Nuria; Sanz, Amelia; Sapiera, Eugenia (2019): Twining Digital Humanities and Humanidades Digitales: A Set of Actual Experiences from the South [Slides]. figshare. Presentation. https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.8874998

Spring has sprung: The Comics Grid Volume 9 (2019) so far

[Comics Grid Spring 2019 Newsletter text below]

Please note our 31st March deadline has now passed.

Due to the high volume of submissions, please note that we are now closed for submissions until 1st November 2019.

Below you will find a listing of the articles published so far in Volume 9 (2019).

We will continue publishing throughout the year as part of Volume 9- keep an eye on the journal’s site (https://www.comicsgrid.com/) and our Twitter account (@ComicsGrid) for new article updates.

Volume 9 (2019) so far:

Lipenga, K.J., 2019. The New Normal: Enfreakment in Saga. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.2. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.161

Davies, P.F., 2019. New Choices of the Comics Creator. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.3. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.153

Grant, P., 2019. The Board and the Body: Material Constraints and Style in Graphic Narrative. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.4. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.145

del Rey Cabero, E., 2019. Beyond Linearity: Holistic, Multidirectional, Multilinear and Translinear Reading in Comics. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.5. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.137

McGovern, M. and Eve, M.P., 2019. Information Labour and Shame in Farmer and Chevli’s Abortion Eve. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.6. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.158

Evans, J., 2019. Challenging Adaptation Studies: A Review of Comics and Adaptation. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.1. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.159

You can catch up with our Volume 8 (2018) here: https://www.comicsgrid.com/7/volume/8/issue/0/

 


We are always in need of more expert reviewers. If you are a self-defined comics scholar or scholar with an interest in comics, have a PhD or are about to get one, you can do peer review for us.

Please register here indicating your areas of expertise.

If you are an author interested in submitting an article for consideration to The Comics Grid, you can start by learning about our submission guidelines. We will re-open our call for submissions on the 1st of November 2019.

Subscribe to the Comics Grid Newsletter at http://eepurl.com/iOYAj

We will continue publishing throughout the year as part of Volume 9- keep an eye on the journal’s site (https://www.comicsgrid.com/) and our Twitter account (@ComicsGrid) for new article updates.

El extraño caso de los archivos reaparecidos / The Strange Case of the Reappeared Archives: Carta Abierta/Open Letter: Periódico de Poesía 2007-2018

[Leer y firmar carta aquí / read sign the letter here]

 

[English version below]

[He compartido aquí esta carta abierta para que quede registro de su existencia. Cuando recibí noticia de esta carta, iniciada por Jorge Fondebrider, el 29 de enero, el archivo de los números 2007-2018 del Periódico de Poesía no estaba disponible de manera clara y visible al visitar https://periodicodepoesia.unam.mx/.  Para mayor contexto sobre la genealogía de este misterioso caso de archivos desaparecidos y reaparecidos, ver el post de Jorge en https://buenosairespoetry.com/2019/01/30/carta-abierta-las-razones-de-un-texto-y-muchas-firmas-jorge-fondebrider/.

Es mi opinión que este es un caso que deja claro que cuestiones de infraestructura académica y humanística, que son casos de arquitectura de la información, son casos políticos. El diseño es político. Lo es porque este es un caso de mal diseño de la interface y del archivo, dejando 10 años (y probablemente más años) de trabajo humanísitico a la intemperie, en riesgo constante de accidente y desaparición. Por eso la carta sigue siendo relevante, pues la reaparición de los archivos desaparecidos no soluciona el problema: es hora de llamar a un experto en ciencias de la información (¡un bibliotecario y archivista!) para que ponga en orden las cosas en el sitio del Periódico de Poesía. Su futuro depende de que eso pase.

I have shared here this open letter for the record. At the time we began collecting the initial signatures, the 2007-2018 issues of Periódico de Poesía were not clearly and visibly available when visiting https://periodicodepoesia.unam.mx/. A day later, once the word had spread, they suddenly reappeared on its home page. For more context on the genealogy of this strange case of disappeared and reappeared archives, please read Jorge’s post at https://buenosairespoetry.com/2019/01/30/carta-abierta-las-razones-de-un-texto-y-muchas-firmas-jorge-fondebrider/.

In my opinion this is a case that proves that issues of academic infrastructure, which are issues of information architecture, are political issues. In other words, information architecture is political. Design is political. It is political because bad interface and archive design are endangering cultural heritage (particularly, but not only, in the Global South). The open letter below is still relevant because the sudden reappearance of the missing archives does not solve the main issue: it is time to call an information professional (a librarian and archivist!) to put things in order at the Periódico de Poesía site. Its future depends on it.]

Los abajo firmantes solicitamos a la UNAM volver a poner a disposición del público el archivo completo del Periódico de Poesía abierta y formalmente en línea, incluyendo todos los números publicados entre 2007 y 2018, los cuales hasta hace poco no aparecían en su archivo en línea, o aparecen/aparecían en locaciones confusas o poco adecuadas del sitio.

The undersigned request UNAM makes the complete archive of Periódico de Poesía (including all the issues published between 2007 and 2018, which until very recently were missing or misplaced) openly available to the public again in an appropriate location within the whole archive.

Para mayor contexto / more context at: https://buenosairespoetry.com/2019/01/30/carta-abierta-las-razones-de-un-texto-y-muchas-firmas-jorge-fondebrider/

[Firmar carta aquí / sign the letter here]

 

Periódico de Poesía: https://periodicodepoesia.unam.mx/

Texto completo de la carta abierta y firmantes iniciales / Full Open Letter in Spanish and initial signataries:

 

Carta Abierta

Periódico de Poesía 2007-2018: Solicitamos volver a poner a disposición del público el archivo completo del Periódico de Poesía en línea de manera formal, segura, sustentable y permanente.

Los abajo firmantes, colaboradores y lectores del Periódico de Poesía de la UNAM entre 2007 y 2018, solicitamos encarecidamente que se vuelva a poner a disposición del público, en formato PDF así como en HTML (ya que el Periódico también publicaba material interactivo) la totalidad de los números publicados en ese periodo, que actualmente no se encuentran donde corresponde, que es en el “Archivo de épocas anteriores de Periódico de Poesía” (http://www.archivopdp.unam.mx/index.php/del-papel-a-pdf).

Habiéndolos publicado ad honorem, los colaboradores entendemos que la única compensación posible por nuestros trabajos es permitir que los lectores, pasados, presentes y futuros, puedan acceder libremente al fruto de nuestros esfuerzos. Así mismo, dada la actual fragilidad del archivo, solicitamos que la UNAM resguarde todos los números del Periódico de Poesía de manera formal en su repositorio institucional, para así asegurar que el contenido esté disponible de manera segura, sustentable y permanente.

Nos sentimos orgullosos de haber colaborado en el Periódico de Poesía y de que nuestra labor sea parte de su patrimonio. Pedimos entonces que la UNAM atienda nuestro reclamo y corrija esta situación.

Atentamente,

[Firmar carta aquí / sign the letter here]

Firmantes iniciales:

ADOLFO CASTAÑÓN (México)
ALEJANDRO SANDOVAL ÁVILA (México)
ALEXIS GÓMEZ ROSA (Rep. Dominicana)
ALFONSO ALEGRE (España)
ALFONSO OREJEL SORIA (México)
ALICIA GARCÍA BERGUA (México)
ÁLVARO VALVERDE (España)
ANA FRANCO (México)
ANDRÉS EHRENHAUS (Argentina)
ANNA CROWE (Escocia)
ANTONIO MARTÍN ALBALATE (España)
ARGEL CORPUS (México)
ARMANDO ROA VIAL (Chile)
AURELIO MAJOR (España/México/Canadá)
BÁRBARA BELLOC (Argentina)
BERNARDO RUÍZ (México)
BLANCA STREPPONI (Argentina / Venezuela)
BRENDA RÍOS (México)
CARLA FAESLER (México)
CARLOS LÓPEZ (México)
CARLOS LÓPEZ BELTRÁN (México)
CARLOS MAPES (México)
CARLOS VITALE (Argentina)
CARMEN SÁNCHEZ (México)
CITLALI GUERRERO (México)
CLAUDIA LUNA FUENTES (México)
CLAUDIA MELNIK (Argentina)
CORAL BRACHO (México)
DANA GELINAS (México)
DANIEL GOLDIN HALFON (México)
DARÍO JARAMILLO (Colombia)
DIANA BELLESSI (Argentina)
EDUARDO ESPINA (Uruguay)
EDUARDO GARCÍA AGUILAR (Colombia)
EDUARDO HURTADO (México)
EDUARDO MILÁN (Uruguay/México)
EDUARDO MOGA (España)
EDWARD HIRSCH (Estados Unidos)
ELIOT WEINBERGER (Estados Unidos)
ENRIQUE JUNCOSA (España)
ENRIQUE WINTER (Chile)
ERNESTO PRIEGO (México/Reino Unido)
FABIO JURADO VALENCIA (Colombia)
FABIO MORÁBITO (México)
FERNANDO HERRERA GÓMEZ (Colombia)
FRANCISCO JOSÉ CRUZ (España)
FRANCISCO SEGOVIA (México)
GASTÓN ALEJANDRO MARTÍNEZ SALDIERNA (México)
GERARDO PINA (México)
GOYA GUTIÉRREZ (España)
GUSTAVO GUERRERO (Venezuela)
GWEN KIRKPATRICK (Estados Unidos)
HARRYETTE MULLEN (Estados Unidos)
HÉCTOR CARRETO (México)
HÉLÈNE CARDONA (Estados Unidos/España)
HERMANN BELLINGHAUSEN (México)
HUGH HAZELTON (Estados Unidos)
IGNACIO DI TULIO (Argentina)
INÉS GARLAND (Argentina)
JAN DE JAGER (Argentina)
JOHN BURNSIDE (Escocia)
JORGE AGUILAR MORA (México)
JORGE AULICINO (Argentina – Premio Nacional de Poesía)
JORGE FONDEBRIDER (Argentina)
JORGE VALDÉZ DÍAZ-VÉLEZ (México)
JOSÉ CARLOS CATAÑO (Canarias-Cataluña)
JOSÉ LUIS BOBADILLA (México)
JOSÉ MARÍA ESPINASA (México)
JOSÉ RAMÓN RIPOLL (España)
JUAN ANTONIO MASOLIVER (España)
JUAN ANTONIO MONTIEL (México/España)
JUAN ARABIA (Argentina)
JUAN CARLOS ABRIL (España)
JUAN CARLOS MARSET (España)
JUAN ESMERIO NAVARRO (México)
JULIA PIERA (España)
JULIÁN HERBERT (México)
JULIO ORTEGA (Perú)
KATHERINE SILVER (Estados Unidos)
LOREA CANALES (México)
LUCRECIA ORENSANZ (México)
LUIS ARMENTA MALPICA (México)
LUIS BRAVO (Uruguay)
LUIS CORTES BARGALLÓ (México)
LUIS MIGUEL AGUILAR (México)
MAGNUS WILLIAM-OLSSON (Suecia)
MARCOS RICARDO BARNATÁN (España)
MARÍA RIVERA (México)
MARINA SERRANO (Argentina)
MARIO CAMPAÑA (Ecuador)
MARIO MONTALBETTI (Perú)
MARK SCHAFER (Estados Unidos)
MARTÍN ESPADA (Estados Unidos)
MATT BROGAN (Estados Unidos)
MERCEDES ÁLVAREZ (Argentina)
MICAELA CHIRIF (Perú)
MICHAEL O’LOUGHLIN (Irlanda)
MIGUEL ÁNGEL PETRECCA (Argentina)
MIGUEL ÁNGEL ZAPATA (Perú)
MIGUEL CASADO (España)
PEDRO POITEVIN (Estados Unidos)
RAFAEL JOSÉ DÍAZ (España)
RICHARD GWYN (Gales)
RODICA GRIGORE (Rumania)
RODOLFO MATA (México)
SAMUEL BOSSINI (Argentina)
SERGIO GASPAR (España)
SILVANA FRANZETTI (Argentina)
SILVIA CAMEROTTO (Argentina)
SILVIA EUGENIA CASTILLERO (México)
SONIA HERNÁNDEZ (España)
SUSANA CABUCHI (Argentina)
SUSANNA RAFART (España)
TANYA HUNTINGTON (Estados Unidos)
TERESA ARIJÓN (Argentina)
TOM POW (Escocia)
VERÓNICA GROSSI (México)
VERÓNICA ZONDEK (Chile)
VÍCTOR RODRÍGUEZ NÚÑEZ (Cuba)
W. H. HERBERT (Escocia)
XANATH CARAZA (México)
XIMENA ATRISTAIN LÓPEZ (México)
VICTOR SOTO FERREL (Tijuana, México)
YOLANDA PANTIN (Venezuela)
ZAZIL COLLINS (México)

 

[Firmar carta aquí / sign the letter here]

Reference

Fondebrider, Jorge; Priego, Ernesto; et al. (2019): Carta Abierta/Open Letter: Periódico de Poesía 2007-2018. figshare. https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.7657976.v1

 

Parabeln der Pflege: new translation of Parables of Care makes comic about dementia care available to German-speaking audiences

Cover of the German version of Parables of Care
Cover of the German version of Parables of Care

A new translation of Parables of Care makes comic about creative responses to dementia care available to German-speaking audiences

 

Download Parables of Care (original English version) from City Research Online, City, University of London: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/18245/

Download Parabeln der Pflege. Kreative Reaktionen in der Demenzpflege, von Pflegenden erzählt [Parables of Care German version] from City Research Online, City, University of London: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/21252/

This new German translation is also available to download from ChesterRep, University of Chester: https://chesterrep.openrepository.com/handle/10034/621804

Parables of Care. Creative Responses to Dementia Care, As Told by Carers is a research-based comic book originally published in English in October 2017.

Parables of Care has now been released in German translation, translated by Dr Andrea Hacker, from the University of Bern, Switzerland.

About working on the German translation, Dr Hacker said:

“I wanted to share Parables of Care not only with my family and the wonderful carers that help us but with a wider German-speaking audience: Alzheimer, dementia – these affect hundreds of thousands of families in the world regardless of language. Widely sharing our experiences of what works will give everyone a chance to make the best of the affliction – patients and families alike.”

[Read our Q&A with Andrea here].

The comic book was created by Dr Simon Grennan, from the Department of Art and Design, University of Chester, UK; Dr Ernesto Priego, from the Centre for Human Computer Interaction Design, City, University of London, UK; and Dr Peter Wilkins from Douglas College, Vancouver, Canada.

The short comic book includes 14 informative and touching stories, drawn by Simon Grennan with Christopher Sperandio, which were adapted from more than 100 case studies of real-life dementia care situations described by a range of carers. These case studies are available at http://carenshare.city.ac.uk/

The small international team looked to expand the accessibility of this archive of carers’ stories and found that by creating short graphic art stories they could portray the emotional power of these situations. Each story is only four panels and just one page long.

Unlike clinical descriptions, this form enhances the affective aspects of each story, putting the reader at the centre of situations that often verge on incomprehensibility, but which are all resolved. In this respect, each story is universalised and becomes a parable.

The book is available open access to dementia carers and the general public as part of ongoing engagement, training and development programmes at City, University of London, the Tavistock and Portman NHS Foundation Trust and The Faculty of Health Sciences at Douglas College, Vancouver, Canada.

About the Translator

Dr Andrea Hacker is an editor, translator and open science professional who lives in Switzerland where she works at the University of Bern. She has previously lived and worked in the US, Russia, Ireland and Germany. She was mentored in literary translation during her graduate studies at UCLA by Michael Henry Heim.

Download Parables of Care (original English version) from City Research Online, City, University of London: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/18245/

Download Parabeln der Pflege. Kreative Reaktionen in der Demenzpflege, von Pflegenden erzählt [Parables of Care German version] from City Research Online, City, University of London: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/21252/

Q&A with Andrea Hacker on her Parables of Care translation: https://blogs.city.ac.uk/parablesofcare/2019/01/24/parabeln-der-pflege-a-qa-with-parables-of-care-translator-andrea-hacker/

For more information, please visit: https://blogs.city.ac.uk/parablesofcare/

Press enquiries contact: John Stevenson, Senior Communications Officer, City, University of London

This post was originally published on the Parables of Care blog at https://blogs.city.ac.uk/parablesofcare/2019/01/24/parabeln-der-flege-parables-of-care-german-translation-release/

2018: A Very Good Year for The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship

This year we broke our own record and published a total of 18 articles during 2018. I cannot say it enough: the Journal is only possible because of the work volunteered by our editors, reviewers and authors: thank you all!

I would also like to thank the Open Library of Humanities (https://www.openlibhums.org/) for their ongoing support: without their funding we wouldn’t be able to do what we do.

Here’s a listing of the articles we published during 2018, our 8th volume, by section:

Research

Rageul, A., 2018. On the Pleasure of Coding Interface Narratives. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 8, p.3. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.107

Dell’Angelo, T. and DeGenova, M., 2018. “I am a Teacher”: Early Career Teachers in High Needs Schools. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 8, p.5. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.115

Baudry, J., 2018. Paradoxes of Innovation in French Digital Comics. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 8, p.4. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.108

Wysocki, L., 2018. Farting Jellyfish and Synergistic Opportunities: The Story and Evaluation of Newcastle Science Comic. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 8, p.6. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.119

Gavaler, C., 2018. Undemocratic Layout: Eight Methods of Accenting Images. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 8, p.8. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.102

Verstappen, N., 2018. Prayoon Chanyawongse’s Cartoon Likay: Amalgamating Likay Theatrical Form and Comics into a Unique Thai Genre. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 8, p.9. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.121

Kowalewski, H., 2018. Heart is for Love: Cognitive Salience and Visual Metonymies in Comics. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 8, p.10. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.117

Zhu, A., Phuong, M. and Giacobbe, P., 2018. The Story of ECT: Behind the Scenes of a Controversial yet Effective Treatment. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 8, p.13. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.129

Rifkind, C., 2018. Geneviève Castrée’s Unmade Beds: Graphic Memoir and Digital Afterlives. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 8, p.14. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.128

Priego, E. and Wilkins, P., 2018. The Question Concerning Comics as Technology: Gestell and Grid. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 8, p.16. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.133

Farinella, M., 2018. Of Microscopes and Metaphors: Visual Analogy as a Scientific Tool. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 8, p.18. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.130

Review

Gröppel-Wegener, A., 2018. Raiding the Superhero Wardrobe: A Review of The Superhero Costume – Identity and Disguise in Fact and Fiction. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 8, p.1. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.122

Bessette, L.S., 2018. We’re All YA Now: A Review of Graphic Novels for Children and Young Adults. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 8, p.2. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.124

Davies, P.F., 2018. Enacting Graphic Mark-Making: A Review of A Theory of Narrative Drawing. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 8, p.7. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.127

Priego, E., 2018. The Comics Page: Scholarly Books Briefly Noted (2017–2018). The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 8, p.11. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.136

Murel, J., 2018. On the Significance of the Graphic Novel to Contemporary Literary Studies: A Review of The Cambridge Companion to the Graphic Novel. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 8, p.15. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.138

Simmons, T.E., 2018. Unmasked Lex Text: A Review of On Comics and Legal Aesthetics – Multimodality and the Haunted Mask of Knowing. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 8, p.17. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.134

Interview

Giddens, T., 2018. “I’m Aware that a Lot of these People that I’m Feeling Sorry for are Wankers”: A Conversation with Hannah Berry. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 8, p.12. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.132


Other Grid-related News

Honourable Mention

This year fellow co-conspirator Dr Peter Wilkins and I received an Open Scholarship Award 2018 Honorable Mention for their Comics Grid editorial work. The Open Scholarship Awards are sponsored by the Canadian Social Knowledge Institute and its partners. The announcement was published on 13 April 2018 by the Electronic Textual Cultures Lab (University of Victoria, Canada). We were literally honoured.

Featured in Open Insights

I’d also like to hank you to Martin Eve and James Smith from the Open Library of Humanities for interviewing me for their Open Insights series, part of their EmpowOA programme. The URL for the interview is: https://www.openlibhums.org/news/275/. Make sure to follow the #EmpowOA hashtag for the whole series. Find out more about the Open Library of Humanities’ EmpowOA programme here.

Editorial Work Experience

This year we also started collaborating with the Creative Writing and Publishing MA Programme at City, University of London by offering our first editorial work experience placement for a postgraduate student. Angelica Curzi started her placement in December 2018. Welcome to the team, Angelica!


Articles received by or after our second yearly editorial deadline (October 2018) have been under review and editorial processes will restart from January 2019.

We completely appreciate scholarly publishing can be a frustrating affair- if you submitted work during 2018 and your submission is still under review (or was accepted but due to be published in 2019) please accept our gratitude for your patience and understanding.

After 8 years we remain a relatively small, volunteer-led scholarly publishing operation, and the volume of submissions this year increased significantly, with 2018 being our busiest year so far, which has meant longer waiting times for authors. This is far from ideal, but we keep working hard to find ways to continue engaging in faster and more efficient and rigorous editorial processes. Thank you once again for bearing with us.

If you are interested in submitting work for review or you just want to find out more about the journal, or catch up with all our previous volumes, please do click on https://www.comicsgrid.com/!

We are also in constant need for academic reviewers. If you would like to become a peer reviewer, please register, including your areas of expertise, at https://www.comicsgrid.com/author/register/reviewer/.

Here’s looking forward to a 2019 full of open access comics scholarship!

To be continued…


[This post was adapted from an email campaign I sent to the Comics Grid newsletter list yesterday. You can subscribe to the Comics Grid Newsletter at http://eepurl.com/iOYAj].

 

The 2018 Altmetric Top 100 Outputs with ‘Comics’ as Keyword

As it’s that time of the year and Altmetric has released its 2018 Top 100, in this post I share the 2018 Top 100 research outputs with ‘comics’ as a keyword according to Altmetric.

I queried the data from the Altmetric Explorer, looking for all outputs with this keyword between 13/12/2017 and 13/12/2018. I then refined the data to concentrate only on the Top 100 outputs about comics.

To see the complete Top 100, you can download the dataset I shared on figshare at https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.7467116.v1.

Below you can quickly take a look at the top 20 outputs with keyword “comics” ordered by their Altmetric Attention score :

Altmetric Attention Score Title Journal/Collection Title Publication Date
524 Ten simple rules for drawing scientific comics PLoS Computational Biology 04/01/2018
286 Comixify: Transform video into a comics 09/12/2018
154 Teaching Confidentiality through Comics at One Spanish Medical School AMA Journal of Ethics 01/02/2018
99 Bruised and Battered: Reinforcing Intimate Partner Violence in Comic Books Feminist Criminology 17/05/2018
84 Of Microscopes and Metaphors: Visual Analogy as a Scientific Tool The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship 10/10/2018
79 The potential of comics in science communication JCOM – Journal of Science Communication 23/01/2018
65 Alter egos: an exploration of the perspectives and identities of science comic creators JCOM – Journal of Science Communication 16/01/2018
61 Using comics to change lives The Lancet 01/01/2018
50 The Question Concerning Comics as Technology: Gestell and Grid The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship 24/09/2018
47 A survey of comics research in computer science 16/04/2018
41 Is There a Comic Book Industry? Media Industries 05/06/2018
38 The Utility of Multiplex Molecular Tests for Enteric Pathogens: a Micro-Comic Strip Journal of Clinical Microbiology 24/01/2018
38 Farting Jellyfish and Synergistic Opportunities: The Story and Evaluation
of Newcastle Science Comic
The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship 20/03/2018
35 Pitfalls in Performing Research in the Clinical Microbiology Laboratory: a Micro-Comic Strip Journal of Clinical Microbiology 25/09/2018
34 Neural Comic Style Transfer: Case Study 05/09/2018
31 Comics and the Ethics of Representation in Health Care … AMA Journal of Ethics AMA Journal of Ethics 01/02/2018
29 Undemocratic Layout: Eight Methods of Accenting Images The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship 25/05/2018
29 Communicating Science through Comics: A Method Publications 30/08/2018
26 Of Cornopleezeepi and Party Poopers: A Brief History of Physicians in Comics … AMA Journal of Ethics AMA Journal of Ethics 01/02/2018
26 On the Significance of the Graphic Novel to Contemporary Literary Studies: A Review of The Cambridge Companion to the Graphic Novel The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship 19/09/2018
DOI Altmetric Details Page URL
10.1371/journal.pcbi.1005845 https://www.altmetric.com/details/31266263
https://www.altmetric.com/details/52485006
10.1001/journalofethics.2018.20.2.medu1-1802 https://www.altmetric.com/details/32564583
10.1177/1557085118772093 https://www.altmetric.com/details/41904868
10.16995/cg.130 https://www.altmetric.com/details/49471637
10.22323/2.17010401 https://www.altmetric.com/details/32104944
10.22323/2.17010201 https://www.altmetric.com/details/31748235
10.1016/s0140-6736(17)33258-0 https://www.altmetric.com/details/31292645
10.16995/cg.133 https://www.altmetric.com/details/48839521
https://www.altmetric.com/details/37717650
10.3998/mij.15031809.0005.102 https://www.altmetric.com/details/43846275
10.1128/jcm.01916-17 https://www.altmetric.com/details/32171741
10.16995/cg.119 https://www.altmetric.com/details/34631498
10.1128/jcm.01144-18 https://www.altmetric.com/details/48881364
https://www.altmetric.com/details/47890394
10.1001/journalofethics.2018.20.2.fred1-1802 https://www.altmetric.com/details/32521484
10.16995/cg.102 https://www.altmetric.com/details/42619367
10.3390/publications6030038 https://www.altmetric.com/details/47265663
10.1001/journalofethics.2018.20.2.mhst1-1802 https://www.altmetric.com/details/32529286
10.16995/cg.138 https://www.altmetric.com/details/48647607

To see the complete Top 100, you can download the dataset I shared on figshare at https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.7467116.v1.

I am obviously very pleased to see The Comics Grid included in the Top 100.

It is interesting to note the diversity of countries associated to the profiles (where the metadata was available) giving attention to the outputs. According to Altmetric, there were 4,588 tweets about research outputs with ‘comics’ as keyword between 13/12/17 and 13/12/18 by 2,866 unique tweeters in 98 different countries. The map looks like this:

Countries and Number of Profiles that Gave Attention to Research Outputs with 'Comics' Keyword between 13/12/17 and 13/12/18 according to Altmetric. Chart by Altmetric Explorer.
Countries and Number of Profiles that Gave Attention to Research Outputs with ‘Comics’ Keyword between 13/12/17 and 13/12/18 according to Altmetric. Chart by Altmetric Explorer.

 

I shared the countries data on figshare at https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.7467455.v1.

For more information and context on Altmetric and using the Altmetric Explorer, see my 2016 post here. Many other posts about alternative metrics and the Altmetric Explorer can be found throghout my blog.

References

Priego, Ernesto (2018): Altmetric Top 100 Outputs with ‘Comics’ Keyword between 13/12/17 and 13/12/18. figshare. Dataset. https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.7467116.v1

Priego, Ernesto (2018): Countries and Number of Profiles that Gave Attention to Research Outputs with ‘Comics’ Keyword between 13/12/17 and 13/12/18 according to Altmetric. figshare. Dataset. https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.7467455.v1

Convegno di studi: Ricerca scientifica, monopoli della conoscenza e Digital Humanities – Rome

As part of my Open Access Week 2018 activities, I will be doing an express trip to Rome on Wednesday 24th October 2018 to participate in the following event:

Convegno di studi  

Ricerca scientifica, monopoli della conoscenza e Digital Humanities. Prospettive critiche dall’Europa del Sud

La investigación científca, los monopolios del conocimiento y Humanidades Digitales. Perspectivas críticas desde el Sur de Europa

Università Roma Tre, 24-25 ottobre 2018

http://scienzepolitiche.uniroma3.it/blog/archives/21635

I also added the event to the Open Access Week 2018 events listing: http://www.openaccessweek.org/events/ricerca-scientifica-monopoli-della-conoscenza-e-digital

Twitter hashtag for the event: #DHPIIGS18

La investigación científca, los monopolios del conocimiento y Humanidades Digitales. Perspectivas críticas desde el Sur de Europa; poster en español
La investigación científca, los monopolios del conocimiento y Humanidades Digitales. Perspectivas críticas desde el Sur de Europa; poster en español

 

I am looking forward to being at Roma Tre again.

My abstract:

Oligopolios del conocimiento y acceso abierto: perspectivas desde el sur
Oligopolies of Knowledge and Open Access: Perspectives from the Global South

Dr Ernesto Priego
Centre for Human Computer Interaction Design
City, University of London, Reino Unido

[sp]
En esta presentación discutiré las razones por las que hablamos de “oligopolios del conocimiento”, detallando la concentración de actividad de comunicaciones académicas (en este caso publicaciones) a través de compañías editoriales con fines de lucro con base en el norte global, por autores con afiliación a universidades del norte global y en la lengua inglesa. Me referiré al trabajo que he estado haciendo en los últimos cinco años documentando y mapeando dicha concentración localizada y en su mayoría monolingüe (con énfasis en las humanidades digitales; Priego et al 2014; Priego y Fiormonte, 2016 y 2018) mediante metodologías de bibliometría alternativa (Alperin et al 2014) para a su vez llamar la atención a la correlación de los imbalances de esta concentración geopolítica (Graham 2011; Fiormonte 2017) con modos de diseminación cerrados de alto costo para instituciones (Lawson 2016). A su vez, discutiré la correspondiente y apropiación de mecanismos de acceso abierto por parte de las mismas compañías editoriales con fines de lucro, mediante estrategias de negocio como los cargos de procesos de publicación (APCs, por sus siglas en inglés), y los retos que esto implica particularmente para los investigadores en las áreas de ciencias sociales, artes y humanidades, y en específico para aquellos con afiliación en el sur global (Priego et al 2017). Finalmente, habiendo detallado lo que es un panorama complejo para las comunicaciones académicas, presentaré ejemplos de alternativas existentes y discutiré los crecientes retos y dilemas específicos a los diversos contextos del sur global.

[eng]

In this presentation I will discuss the reasons why we speak of “oligopolies of knowledge”, detailing the concentration of activity of academic communications (in this case, publications) via for profit publishing companies based in the global north, by authors with affiliation with universities in the global north and in the English language. I will refer to the work I have been doing in the last five years, documenting and mapping this localised and mostly monolingual concentration (with an emphasis on the digital humanities, Priego et al 2014, Priego and Fiormonte, 2016 and 2018) through alternative bibliometric methodologies (Alperin et al 2014), in order to draw attention to the correlation of the imbalances of this geopolitical concentration (Graham 2011, Fiormonte 2017) with closed modes of dissemination of high cost for institutions (Lawson 2016). In turn, I will discuss the corresponding and appropriation of open access mechanisms by the same for profit publishing companies, through business strategies such as Article Processing Charges (APCs) and the challenges that this implies particularly for researchers in the areas of social sciences, arts and humanities, and specifically for those with affiliations in the global south (Priego et al 2017; Eve and Priego 2018). Finally, having detailed what a complex picture for academic communications is, I will present examples of existing alternatives and discuss the growing challenges and dilemmas specific to the various contexts of the global South.

 

Referencias/References

Alperin, JP., Babini, D., Fischman, G. (eds.) 2014. Open access indicators and scholarly communications in Latin America (Buenos Aires: CLACSO, First edtion). Available in full text on the Web Virtual Library of CLACSO: http://www.biblioteca.clacso.edu.ar

Fiormonte, D. 2017. Digital Humanities and the Geopolitics of Knowledge. Digital Studies/Le champ num ́erique, 7(1). Available at: https://doi.org/10.16995/dscn.274

Fiormonte, E. & Priego, E., 2016. Knowledge Monopolies and Global Academic Publishing. The Winnower. Available at: https://doi.org/10.15200/winn.147220.00404

Graham, et al, M., 2011. Visualizing the uneven geographies of knowledge production and circulation. Global Higher Education, 14.9. Available at: https://globalhighered.wordpress.com/2011/09/14/visualizing-the-uneven-geographies-of-knowledge-production-and-circulation/

Lawson, S., Gray, J., Mauri, M., (2016). Opening the Black Box of Scholarly Communication Funding: A Public Data Infrastructure for Financial Flows in Academic Publishing. Open Library of Humanities. 2(1), p.e10. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/olh.72

Priego, E. and Fiormonte, D. 2018. Empire and Scholarly Communications. Multinational Monopolies of Knowledge and the Global South. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.6634484.v8

Priego, E.; Havemann, L.; Atenas, J. 2014 Source Dataset for Online Attention to Digital Humanities Publications (#DH2014 poster). Available at:
http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.1094359

Priego, E. et al. 2014. Online Attention to Digital Humanities Publications (#DH2014 poster). Available at: https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.1094345.v1

Eve, M. and Priego, E. (2017). Who is Actually Harmed by Predatory Publishers?. tripleC: Communication, Capitalism & Critique. Open Access Journal for a Global Sustainable Information Society, 15(2), pp. 755-770. Available at: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/18007

Priego, E. et al. 2017. Scholarly Publishing, Freedom of Information and Academic Self-Determination: The UNAM-Elsevier Case. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.5632657.v1

 

 

Openness, Transparency, Accountability: On New Ways of Being Scholarly

 

Mural para la promoción de la transparencia en una escuela pública de La Ceiba (Honduras). David Puig
Public School in La Ceiba, Honduras. Photo by David Puig

 

“Universities are what Foucault [1986] called heterotopias -spaces where a better future can be represented. (Heterotopia is the nice word for “not the real world”). One might be to take the heterotopia of the university as a desirable model for an equitable society rather than a laughable site of cloistered privilege.”

-Toby Miller (2012: 118)

 

I first read Paulo Freire’s Pedagogy of the Oppressed (1970) in Spanish, as an English literature undergraduate student in Mexico City. It was at the university library that I stumbled upon it. I left the blue Oxford Anthology of English Literature volume II to one side and started reading.

I now own a second-hand copy of the 1996 English edition, published by Penguin Education in paperback. The back cover reads:

In this landmark account, first published over twenty years ago, Paulo Freire argues that the ignorance and lethargy of the poor are the direct result of the whole situation of economic, social and political domination. By beint kept in a situation in which is practically impossible to achieve critical awareness and response the disadvantaged are kept ‘submerged’. In some countries, the oppressors use the system of education to maintain this ‘culture of silence’, while in others the advance of technology has condemned  many people, particularly the less well off, to a rigid comformity. […]”

This blurb, written in the early 1990s for a book first published in 1970, refers to some of the key issues that sum up both the background and the consequences of the situation I’d like to briefly address today:

  • ignorance and lethargy of the disadvantaged
  • a situation of economic and social domination
  • practical impossibility of achieving critical awareness and response
  • the disadvantaged are kept submerged
  • the system of education as a means to maintain a ‘culture of silence’
  • the advance of technology condemining many to a rigid comformity

The issues above are still pretty much in full effect today, not only at the most basic levels of education or in developing countries, but in Higher Education and around the globe, including what we call ‘developed countries’ of the Global North. The huge disparities with scholarly systems both foster and perpetuate a system that seems to resist more tranformative, equitable change. This is perhaps best exemplified by the challenges faced by scholarly associations as key components of how Higher Education operates.

I have been an on-and-off member of academic email listservs and professional and scholarly associations for more than 20 years now. I still remember clearly the first time I ‘surfed’ the World Wide Web, and the first time, before that, that I sent an email. I remember the excitement of feeling empowered- for me and to many others, the Internet and the World Wide Web represented the possibility of doing things yourself in a more efficient and more global manner. For those of us who developed a political identity aided by punk and other subcultures, Doing It Yourself was an ethos that seemed naturally amplified by the Web. If you had made and posted (mailed out) fanzines before the Internet, message boards, listservs and blogging were a dream made true.

It wasn’t only the feasibility of nearly-immediate global communication, the Web was not merely a new channel, but an invitation to do things differently. In science and research, Open Access was a logical consequence to the freedom that online publishing could mean– what seemed like a more direct access to the means of scholarly publishing was an invitation to not only publish scholarly content differently (i.e., disseminate it differently), but to do research differently.

That initial enthusiasm was somewhat naïve. We hadn’t counted with how disruptive new technologies would be to previous ways of being and doing, and particularly to established ways to maintain privilege and make money. It soon became clear that projects could not rely only on volunteer labour, and that there was sheer inequality embedded in platforms that relied on user generated content- some provided the work for free, others, often almost invisibly, profitted from it. Working for free -or for a delayed financial reward, as an investment- is a privilege, one whose foundations lie in many others who are disadvantaged.

This leads me to scholarly associations. One of their biggest challenges lies in the structural inequality that academia is made of. Individuals may have an interest in common, but this does not mean they share the same context, and this includes both privileges and disadvantages. Scholarly societies, like academic journals, have been often brilliant examples of academic self-organisation, but this self-organisation has traditionally relied on volunteer labour.

This free or volunteer scholarly labour (many times of the much-dreaded administrative-but-essential type) takes time in real time and place, and what is at stake for each individual can be significantly different. Differences in seniority within scholarly groups also mean that not everyone is equally empowered to participate in the same ways. So it’s not only a question of who can afford the time and space to volunteer work for scholarly associations (for example doing peer review, or as an acting officer within the association’s struture), but of who is encouraged and empowered enough to participate actively and critically, in order to contribute to the association’s growth. Structural differences re: who has power and who doesn’t determines who participates in which ways, who remains merely ‘submerged’, as numbers to justify and metricate others’ power, and do create and postergate cultures of fear and silence.

It is difficult and time consuming to implement, but in any organisation that aspires to call itself ‘fair’ members should have a voice and that voice should be not only heard but recognised and addressed transparently and respectfully. When associations charge a membership fee, whether we like it or not the stakes are higher:  there has to be not only the right for members to voice concerns, but for them to ask questions and to expect transparency and accountability from those leading or taking key decisions on behalf of stakeholders.

Often, members pay their fees at great personal expense, and deserve to contribute to (and yes, even disagree with) any decision-making that affects the association, even if they are not part of committees. In the context of widely spread precarious labour in academia, paying a fee is perhaps one of the most essential ways of contributing to an association, and a paying member’s feedback should be taken seriously and respectfully.

The way in which it’s done will vary depending on the size of the organisations, but some issues in which paying members of organisations should be transparently informed of and consulted about in a timely manner (that is, when there’s still time to change anything) include, but are not limited to:

  • Wording and application of bylaws
  • All financial matters, how and when funds are allocated for what; who receives how much when and what for
  • Partnerships with other organisations
  • Conference matters, from CFPs drafting to practical matters of location, registration costs, keynote speakers, etc.
  • Scholarly communication strategies, including choice of publishers, journals, dissemination models, licensing, pricing, social media policies, etc.

All the important decisions cannot be taken while the majority is busy doing other work. And sometimes everyone is so busy that there’s no time to even engage after decisions are taken. It is easier to just go with the flow because engagement takes time and energy, both highly valuable resources that have been systemically made scarce. Toby Miller explained how in academia it is workers with minimal agency what “permits the top to exist.” Their labour, Miller argued, “comprises the conditions of possibility for research academia to flourish: almost invisible, casualized employees allow the institutions where they work to be concrete” (Miller 2015). This is indeed also the case for scholarly or professional associations.

Scholarly associations often depend on members coming forward and making themselves available to perform specific duties, but we must never forget that being able to participate ‘actively’ in one of those roles requires from specific preconditions. To be able to participate in a role is a privilege, and it is also an honour, and a responsibility. Because playing an active role in an association can be a poisoned chalice, not everyone is willing to come forward and participate more directly as part of committees. But there are more complex reasons why  fewer colleagues volunteer to participate in leading organisational structures. Sometimes it is a question of honest lack of time, sometimes it’s lack of experience, sometimes it’s fear, sometimes there is a glass ceiling.

In a democracy, a key duty as citizens is to observe the law and vote for our representatives. It is not acceptable for someone in government to respond to citizen feedback with a “you should have run for councilor/representative/governor/president!”. In a scholarly association, we need to understand that some members will not be able to participate as, say, treasurers but still be able to keep an eye on the finances by asking questions and expecting responses from those in charge, particularly (but not only) if those in charge were elected by the membership.

If there is not a lot of active participation from the membership in terms of helping shape an organisation’s scholarly culture, policies, practices, we must look into the reasons for this perceived passivity, and try to foster more engagement through strategies that recognise the diversity of the membership’s contexts. The lack of more active engagement in procedural matters cannot be an excuse for opaque decision-making and the concentration of authority in a limited group.

It is an embarrassment that bullying keeps on being a mode of engagement in Higher Education (Devlin and Marsh 2018). Bullying becomes structural both because and when there are cultures of silence, and when those in power are effectively unaccountable. Bullying thrives when authority is unaccountable and when decision-making takes place behind closed doors. The diversity of ages, roles and levels of seniority in Higher Education does not have to be an excuse to keep those who are more disadvantaged or junior for different reasons to remain ‘submerged’ and to tacitly force them to accept a ‘rigid comformity’ that only benefits those already in power and authority. We need to start by acknowledging the importance of conducting ourselves transparently and with accountability. This means not ignoring critical feedback from colleagues, no matter how junior, and this includes truly acknowledging issues and sincerely addressing them honestly and as directly and publicly as possible.

I belong to a generation that grew up reacting against political corruption, censorship and dictatorial policies. The concentration of privilege in a happy few who insist on remaining unaccountable by strictly discretional, opaque decision-making should be undesirable to all of us today as it was then. Why would we accept in scholarly circles what we do not accept in politics?

Long gone should be the days (did they ever really exist as such?) in which it was acceptable to quietly sit back and let others steer the ship. Everyone on board has a role to play, and everyone should have a right to voice concerns respectfully– for this there should be appropriate, transparent guidelines and channels. If we aspire to work towards a fairer academia, we need to work harder at learning to listen to feedback, and to address it accordingly.

This has been said again and again (if you’ve been listening), but we still need o learn to interrogate our own privilege, and the cost that privilege has, and who is currently paying that cost. If you are in a position of power within an scholarly association, and a member asks you a question publicly, do not ignore it: do not take personal offense and address the question publicly. It’s the least we can do. We can only achieve critical self-awareness if we don’t close ourselves to questions. We need other, newer ways of being scholarly.

Toby Miller’s vision for the university of an heterotopia as a model for an equitable society requires the transparency and openness we expect from other organsiations today. Sadly, as we continue seeing on various fronts (perhaps most poignantly in a case like this), transparency and publicness are not yet enough to elicit true accountability. But it’s a start.

It’s 2018, but there is evidence that situations denounced by the likes of Freire in the early 1970s still take place today.  Many will find all this about a different way of doing things laughable, impractical and unrealistic. But it seems doable to many of us; at least trying is the ethical thing to do. All of us who work in education -this includes me too- must avoid at all cost becoming those oppressors that we read about as bright-eyed young students once upon a time.

 

References

Foucault, M. 1986. “Of Other Spaces.” Diacritics 16 (1): 22-27. DOI: 10.2307/464648. https://www.jstor.org/stable/464648.

Miller, T. 2012. Blow Up The Humanities. Philadelphia: Temple University Press.

Miller, T. 2015. “Humanities bottom to top: The cognitariat and publishing.” Ctrl-Z: New Media Philosophy, 5. Available open access from Loughborough University’s Institutional Repository: https://dspace.lboro.ac.uk/2134/23241.

Freire, P. 1996. [1970]. Pedagogy of the Oppressed. London: Penguin.

Devlin, H. and Marsh, S. 2018. “Hundreds of academics at top UK universities accused of bullying”. Friday 28 September 2018. The Guardian. Available at https://www.theguardian.com/education/2018/sep/28/academics-uk-universities-accused-bullying-students-colleagues. [Accessed 9 October 2018].