Parabeln der Pflege: new translation of Parables of Care makes comic about dementia care available to German-speaking audiences

Cover of the German version of Parables of Care
Cover of the German version of Parables of Care

A new translation of Parables of Care makes comic about creative responses to dementia care available to German-speaking audiences

 

Download Parables of Care (original English version) from City Research Online, City, University of London: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/18245/

Download Parabeln der Pflege. Kreative Reaktionen in der Demenzpflege, von Pflegenden erzählt [Parables of Care German version] from City Research Online, City, University of London: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/21252/

This new German translation is also available to download from ChesterRep, University of Chester: https://chesterrep.openrepository.com/handle/10034/621804

Parables of Care. Creative Responses to Dementia Care, As Told by Carers is a research-based comic book originally published in English in October 2017.

Parables of Care has now been released in German translation, translated by Dr Andrea Hacker, from the University of Bern, Switzerland.

About working on the German translation, Dr Hacker said:

“I wanted to share Parables of Care not only with my family and the wonderful carers that help us but with a wider German-speaking audience: Alzheimer, dementia – these affect hundreds of thousands of families in the world regardless of language. Widely sharing our experiences of what works will give everyone a chance to make the best of the affliction – patients and families alike.”

[Read our Q&A with Andrea here].

The comic book was created by Dr Simon Grennan, from the Department of Art and Design, University of Chester, UK; Dr Ernesto Priego, from the Centre for Human Computer Interaction Design, City, University of London, UK; and Dr Peter Wilkins from Douglas College, Vancouver, Canada.

The short comic book includes 14 informative and touching stories, drawn by Simon Grennan with Christopher Sperandio, which were adapted from more than 100 case studies of real-life dementia care situations described by a range of carers. These case studies are available at http://carenshare.city.ac.uk/

The small international team looked to expand the accessibility of this archive of carers’ stories and found that by creating short graphic art stories they could portray the emotional power of these situations. Each story is only four panels and just one page long.

Unlike clinical descriptions, this form enhances the affective aspects of each story, putting the reader at the centre of situations that often verge on incomprehensibility, but which are all resolved. In this respect, each story is universalised and becomes a parable.

The book is available open access to dementia carers and the general public as part of ongoing engagement, training and development programmes at City, University of London, the Tavistock and Portman NHS Foundation Trust and The Faculty of Health Sciences at Douglas College, Vancouver, Canada.

About the Translator

Dr Andrea Hacker is an editor, translator and open science professional who lives in Switzerland where she works at the University of Bern. She has previously lived and worked in the US, Russia, Ireland and Germany. She was mentored in literary translation during her graduate studies at UCLA by Michael Henry Heim.

Download Parables of Care (original English version) from City Research Online, City, University of London: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/18245/

Download Parabeln der Pflege. Kreative Reaktionen in der Demenzpflege, von Pflegenden erzählt [Parables of Care German version] from City Research Online, City, University of London: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/21252/

Q&A with Andrea Hacker on her Parables of Care translation: https://blogs.city.ac.uk/parablesofcare/2019/01/24/parabeln-der-pflege-a-qa-with-parables-of-care-translator-andrea-hacker/

For more information, please visit: https://blogs.city.ac.uk/parablesofcare/

Press enquiries contact: John Stevenson, Senior Communications Officer, City, University of London

This post was originally published on the Parables of Care blog at https://blogs.city.ac.uk/parablesofcare/2019/01/24/parabeln-der-flege-parables-of-care-german-translation-release/

New Publication: The Question Concerning Comics as Technology: Gestell and Grid

Still from Rear Window (dir. Alfred Hitchcock 1954). © 1954 Universal Pictures.
Still from Rear Window (dir. Alfred Hitchcock 1954). © 1954 Universal Pictures.

This week saw the publication of a new journal article coauthored by Peter Wilkins and yours truly:

Priego, E. & Wilkins, P., (2018). The Question Concerning Comics as Technology: Gestell and Grid. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship. 8, p.16. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.133

In glorious open access.

I have also deposited the article at the following open access repositories:

This article’s peer review and editorial processes were managed independently by Benoît Crucifix, Björn-Olav Dozo, and Aarnoud Rommens.

We are very grateful to the editors and peer reviewers for their rigorous, robust, extensive and thoughtful critical review and feedback, which enabled us to significantly improve the original submission into its present form.

We have had an overwhelmingly kind and positive response so far– thank you everyone for reading and for your feedback.

 

 

An Interview with Peter Wilkins re: Parables of Care

I interviewed Peter Wilkins a few days ago for the Parables of Care blog, and I have copied and pasted the post below:

Dr Peter Wilkins, Douglas College
Dr Peter Wilkins, Douglas College

Dr Peter Wilkins is the Research and Innovation Coordinator at Douglas College (Canada), and he manages programs for at-risk youth for the Douglas College Training Group. Peter is a founding editor (with David N. Wright) of Graphixia and the Deputy Editor of The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship.

Peter worked in partnership with Dr Simon Grennan of the University of Chester, Dr Ernesto Priego of City, University of London, and an NHS Trust, to produce Parables of Care.

We asked Peter some questions about working on Parables of Care.

What is it that most interested you about Care’N’Share as a resource?

Peter Wilkins: Care‘N’Share gives a startling insight into the caregivers’ relationship to the dementia situation and their patients. I think we were all struck by the power of the stories even though they often occur in the most mundane settings. If we looked at it from a literary or narrative point of view, the stories often begin in realist mode and then suddenly shift into a surrealist or absurdist one.

The caregiver is like a character who passes through the wardrobe into a Narnia painted by Salvador Dali. Or like Marlowe going into the Congo in Heart of Darkness. They bring back something that gives us a glimpse into an alternative reality that shocks and frightens us. The uncanniness of the stories made me think of an untapped potential in using art, not as therapy, but as a means of accounting for dementia in a way that medical discourse doesn’t allow us to do.

http://carenshare.city.ac.uk/

Some stories in Parables of Care appear to be more or less difficult to ‘get’. What was the thinking behind it?

PW: Well, dementia is difficult to ‘get.’ Indeed, it is what philosophers would call sublime, unpresentable. This is where the idea of parable as a form or genre comes from and why we were so interested in the stories in the app. They are stories of practical reason, of enigmatic utility, of not knowing what to do in a difficult situation. This quality of the stories lends to the caregivers a kind of poetic heroism: they are faced with demands from the other side of rationality, dementia world, that they have to respond to in creative ways. So our conclusion was that caregivers are poets. To present the comics as easy solutions to the difficult problems of caring for people with dementia would not do justice to the caregivers.

On a related note, we were not interested in using the comics medium as a way of making things appear simple, in an “instrumental” use of comics. We don’t care for the idea of comics as simplistic communication; we care for the idea of comics as provocative works of art that will make their audience think and think again. It was great to work with Simon because he understands this through and through, and his drawings work really well at managing the audience’s response.

Peter Wilkins and members of the Douglas College Psychiatric Nursing team participate remotely at a Parables of Care workshop at City, 22 March 2017
Dr Peter Wilkins and members of the Douglas College Nursing team participate remotely with City Publishing & Creative Industries and HCID participants at a Parables of Care workshop, 22 March 2017, City, University of London

You are based in Vancouver, Canada. Can you tell us more about Douglas College‘s involvement in Parables of Care?

PW: We want to produce a companion volume to Parables that depicts the attitudes towards, and knowledge about, dementia from faculty and students across our Health Sciences faculty. We are working with focus groups from a range of programs, from Nursing through Dental Assisting, to generate material for the comic. The enthusiasm for the project here is tremendous, so we are very excited.

We are involving students in the work, which is important to us. They are running the focus groups and collecting the data. We have a young artist who has more experience in video game design than comics, but she is very committed and enthusiastic. It will be interesting to see how her work plays off of Simon [Grennan]’s. Sarah Leavitt, whose Tangles: A Story of Alzheimer’s, My Mother and Me is a groundbreaking graphic memoir on the subject, is consulting on the project, working with the artist.

Cover of Tangles, by Sarah Leavitt (Broadview Press, 2010)
Cover of Tangles, by Sarah Leavitt (Broadview Press, 2010)

A number of people from the faculty have told me about how they are professional caregivers, but when one of their family members has been struck by dementia they have been incapable of dealing with it. I’m interested in capturing those stories.

In any event, I see Parables of Care as the beginning of a much larger project that explores and documents dementia in comic book form.

Did you identify differences in how Canada and the UK approach dementia care?

PW: I can’t answer this question yet, but I hope to have some clues as we compare the data we collect with that from the Care‘N’Share app. I suspect that there will be differences and that they will be meaningful because even within Canada the different caregiving disciplines that engage with dementia don’t seem to communicate with each other that much. There are all kinds of gaps in the responses. I hope that the project allows people who work with dementia sufferers and their families to connect some dots and work towards a more holistic and universal approach to care.

There’s more than a hundred cases in Care’N’Share. As an editor, how did you approach the collection?

Our approach was to identify cases that represented particular strands of the dementia situation. While each case is unique, the stories do fall into categories: broken analogies, misrecognition, confinement and a desire for freedom and so on. What is important is that there are lots of satisfying though enigmatic eureka moments, where the undoubtable horror of dementia is relieved temporarily by the caregiver’s sympathy and genius.

Parables of Care can be downloaded as a PDF file, under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License, from City Research Online: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/18245/.

If you live in the UK you can request printed copies at no cost here.

This post was originally published on the Parables of Care blog on 19 October 2017 at https://blogs.city.ac.uk/parablesofcare/2017/10/19/parables-of-care-a-qa-with-peter-wilkins/. If links to embedded media appear broken it is because the original post may have been changed or undergoing maintenance.

An Interview with Simon Grennan re: Parables of Care

I interviewed Simon Grennan last week for the Parables of Care blog, and I have copied and pasted the post here.

 

Dr Simon Grennan, University of Chester
Dr Simon Grennan, University of Chester

Dr Simon Grennan, is a Post-Doctoral Research Fellow in Art and Design at the Department of Art and Design, University of Chester. He is an internationally acclaimed contemporary artist, comics scholar and author of over 40 comics and artists’ books.

Simon worked in partnership with Dr Ernesto Priego of City, University of London, Dr Peter Wilkins of Douglas College, Vancouver, Canada and an NHS Trust, to produce Parables of Care.

We asked Simon some questions about working on Parables of Care.

What was your first impression of the Care’N’Share stories?

Simon Grennan: I was immediately fascinated by the combination of descriptions of emotional/physical challenges and the extreme brevity of the case studies. The stories told by carers already conformed to a rather strict pattern derived from a proforma, designed to enable speedy access to the information that each story provides, for readers. This might have denuded the case studies of their affective aspects, but in fact, it focused and intensified them. That was immediately striking and interesting.

 

http://carenshare.city.ac.uk/

 

What was the most challenging for you in the drawing process?


SG: The editorial task for Peter, Ernesto and I involved considering how this combination of emotional impact, information and brevity could be visualised. The concept of the parable offered an accurate description of the stories as told by carers: the original stories already had the effect of parables.

We lighted upon a key aspect of the parable – its function of representing big effects (issues, truths, significant ideas) by small means. This ‘big in small’ characteristic was actually quite easy to visualise, because there is a great range of visual models, particularly in the history and traditions of the comic strip: visual gags, for example.

We immediately thought of the four panel Japanese ‘yonkoma joke strips, which follow a set pattern for divisions of action. The form both produces and disperses ambiguity. That’s the way in which it works as a visual joke. Although the Care’N’Share stories aren’t jokes, by any means, part of their ‘parable’ character articulates exactly this manipulation of clarity and ambiguity. This seemed like a form particularly suited to these particular stories about dementia care, in which initial challenges to capacity, comprehension and communications are overcome by creative means.

In each story, there is a challenging scenario resulting from a specific experience of dementia, which is then reflected/acted up and finally resolved. For me, the task was then to visually articulate this balance of ambiguity and clarity in the narrative drawing, first creating a level of affective unclarity in the reader that I then develop and finally resolve.

As with visual jokes, creating the right affective balance between ambiguity and clarity is the main task. Too much ambiguity and the reader doesn’t know what’s happening. To much clarity and the reader has no emotional stake in the story. In both of these scenarios, the joke (or in this case, affect) disappears and the story fails.

I hope that I’ve managed to get the balance right! If so, each story should function as a parable, packing a lot of emotional punch (and taking the reader from ambiguity to clarity) with very few means.

 

 Dr Simon Grennan during one of the Parables of Care workshops, 22 March 2017, City, University of London
Dr Simon Grennan during one of the Parables of Care workshops, 22 March 2017, City, University of London

 

‘A Theory of Narrative Drawing’: what theoretical principles did you apply in Parables of Care?


That’s an interesting question. My new book A Theory of Narrative Drawing seeks to explain experiences of drawn stories, but it’s not quite a handbook for drawing stories! However, one of the interesting things about Parables of Care is its self-announcing, overt reliance upon the reader to articulate the visual story and the story world. Of course, the reader always undertakes this articulation, in every story.

However, in Parables of Care, this is entirely due to the creation of ambiguity in each story. These are stories where a reader feels that they can or are making mistaken readings or, if the stories don’t clarify themselves for some readers, they think that the stories are simply incoherent or/and badly told. It is only when a reader realises that ‘making mistakes’ is an affective substitute for aspects of the experiences of dementia that are told about in each story, for example, that the sensation of ambiguity is transformed, located and resolved. This is entirely the type of affective reading that A Theory of Narrative Drawing explains.

 

What are you hoping Parables of Care can achieve?


SG: I hope that Parables of Care will focus attention on the emotional aspects of dementia care. We have worked hard to introduce readers to the (largely non-clinical) experience of dementia care by providing them with affective sensations of ambiguity, including a sense of inexplicable altered capacity, frustration and maybe a sense of powerlessness. These sensations are turned around and articulated in each story, retaining the emotional intelligence and creativity of the resolutions to challenging situations. The reader goes throught this process too, and reaches a similar clarity and resolve.

Parables of Care can be downloaded as a PDF file, under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License, from City Research Online: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/18245/.

If you live in the UK you can request printed copies at no cost here.

This interview was originally published at https://blogs.city.ac.uk/parablesofcare/2017/10/12/parables-of-care-a-qa-with-simon-grennan/. If links to embedded media appear broken it is because the original post may have been changed or undergoing maintenance.

New Article: Who is Actually Harmed by Predatory Publishers?

New peer reviewed, open access article, published on 13 August 2017:

Who is Actually Harmed by Predatory Publishers?

Martin Paul Eve* and Ernesto Priego**

*Birkbeck, University of London, London, UK

**City, University of London, London, UK

Download the PDF from tripleC: Communication, Capitalism & Critique. Open Access Journal for a Global Sustainable Information Society

FULL TEXT (HTML)

tripleC is a peer-reviewed, open-access journal (ISSN: 1726-670X). All journal content, except where otherwise noted, is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.

Also available at City Research Online: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/18007/

and at Birkbeck Institutional Research Online: http://eprints.bbk.ac.uk/19356/

Abstract: ‘Predatory publishing’ refers to conditions under which gold open access academic publishers claim to conduct peer review and charge for their publishing services but do not, in fact, actually perform such reviews. Most prominently exposed in recent years by Jeffrey Beall, the phenomenon garners much media attention. In this article, we acknowledge that such practices are deceptive but then examine, across a variety of stakeholder groups, what the harm is from such actions to each group of actors. We find that established publishers have a strong motivation to hype claims of predation as damaging to the scholarly and scientific endeavour while noting that, in fact, systems of peer review are themselves already acknowledged as deeply flawed.

Keywords: Open Access, Scholarly Communications, Predatory Publishing, Evaluative Cultures, Academia

Acknowledgement: The authors wish to thank Ross Mounce and David Prosser for helpful comments on the manuscript of this article. Parts of this article on the problems of peer review are derived from and share a narrative with a chapter by Eve that is currently under submission.

FULL TEXT (HTML)

Chronicle of a Death Foretold: At Nieman Storyboard, My Translation of an Interview with Slain Journalist Javier Valdez

Javier Valdez. Photo via Río Doce
Javier Valdez. Photo via Río Doce

“Tell them not to kill me, Justino! Go on and tell them that. For God’s sake! Tell them. Tell them please for God’s sake.”

“I can’t. There’s a sergeant there who doesn’t want to hear anything about you.”

“Make him listen to you. Use your wits and tell him that scaring me has been enough. Tell him please for God’s sake.”

Juan Rulfo (1917-1986), Tell Them Not To Kill Me, 1951

I‘ve just published a translation of an interview with the slain Mexican journalist Javier Valdez at Nieman Storyboard (Neiman Foundation for Journalism at Harvard University).

http://niemanstoryboard.org/stories/the-truth-must-be-told-a-conversation-with-slain-mexican-journalist-javier-valdez/

The tragic situation that Mexican journalism iexemplifies a level of impunity that no degree of mass media coverage or social media engagement seems to be able to deter. However, as Valdez put it, “the truth must be told”, and remaining silent is being complicit.

I translated the interview into English because I think it offers insights into what motivated Valdez and that it’s important that English-speaking readers learn more about his life, work and commitment to journalism.

It won’t take you long to read it if you click on the link. If you do, thank you.

 

Descanza en paz, Javier, y muchas gracias.

New Publication: Editorial: Brilliant Corners: Approaches to Jazz and Comics

The Comics Grid logo

Sometimes academic publishing is like London buses. You wait for what it feels like an eternity and then suddenly three appear at the same time.

Yesterday the editorial my colleague Nicolas Pillai and I co-wrote was published on The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship:

Pillai, N. & Priego, E., (2016). Brilliant Corners: Approaches to Jazz and Comics. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship. 6, p.12. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.92

It’s been an absolute honour and pleasure to work on this project with Nic; stay tuned as there might be further collaborations! We were fortunate to get such exciting submissions for the collection.

Like all Comics Grid articles our editorial cited above is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (CC BY 4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.  You can read it online, and/or download the PDF or XML, openly and without restrictions. You are also free to share it, use it or reuse it without prior permissions as long as you attribute properly. (For more info see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).

The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship is a peer-reviewed open access journal published by the Open Library of Humanities [OLH].

Unlike many open-access publishers, the OLH does not charge any author fees. This does not mean that their journals do not have costs. Costs are paid by an international library consortium.

If your institution is not currently supporting the platform, you could ask your librarian to sign up. The OLH is extremely cost effective and is a not-for-profit charity. However, while the OLH cannot function without financial support and they encourage universities to sign up, institutional commitment is not required to publish in any of their journals.

 

 

New Publication: Data Paper. Data from Graphic Medicine… Insigths from Comics Producers

Open Health Data logo

Excited to have a new co-authored peer-reviewed publication, a data paper on the Journal of Open Health Data:

Farthing, A. & Priego, E., (2016). Data from ‘Graphic Medicine’ as a Mental Health Information Resource: Insights from Comics Producers. Open Health Data. 4(1), p.e3. DOI: http://doi.org/10.5334/ohd.25

In the paper we describe a dataset containing the full text transcripts from 15 semi-structured interviews (approximately 44,100 words) conducted during November and December 2014 with participants involved in various aspects of the process of health-related comics production. These participants are authors and publishers and their work is publicly recognised in the comics community.

An initial domain analysis of the interviews was published on 8 February 2016 as Farthing, A., & Priego, E. (2016). ‘Graphic Medicine’ as a Mental Health Information Resource: Insights from Comics Producers. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 6(1), 3. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.74

Little by little we might see more qualitative research datasets openly available. It’s not just quantitative datasets that have reuse potential. Many thanks to for the helpful feedback and for encouraging multidisciplinary open research data description, archiving and preservation!

 

New addition to the Brilliant Corners: Approaches to Jazz and Comics special collection

Gordon Minhinnick, ‘In the Groove,’ New Zealand Herald, 4 September 1952, p. 10 (© New Zealand Herald).
Gordon Minhinnick, ‘In the Groove,’ New Zealand Herald, 4 September 1952, p. 10 (© New Zealand Herald).

As some of you may know I have co-edited with Dr Nicolas Pillai (Birmingham City University) a special collection of peer-reviewed research articles for The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship.

Brilliant Corners: Approaches to Jazz and Comics aims to find meeting points between the disciplines of jazz studies and comics studies.

Over the last forty years, the fields of jazz studies and comic studies have gained currency within the academy and have been enriched by interdisciplinary approaches. The New Jazz Studies has invigorated the discipline beyond its musicological roots, while Comics Studies has thrived in the digital age.

The call for papers for this special collection was published on 30 July 2015 and the deadline for submissions was 15 January 2016. The articles in this collection have been published in the order in which they were ready for publication (i.e. not as a ‘bulk’ or single issue).

Yesterday we published a new addition to the collection:

 

New Zealand Jazz Concerts, the Use and Abuse of Grand Pianos, and One Cartoonist’s Response, by jazz historian Aleisha Ward.

Abstract

Political, social, and cultural controversies are the main fodder of staff cartoonists at newspapers. From the serious to the silly, newspaper cartoonists are expected to comment on whatever happens to be in the news cycle on any day. This commentary creates both ephemera and historical evidence of events and their effects on society. This article investigates an incident at a jazz concert in Auckland in 1952 at which the musicians were charged with abusing the new Steinway grand piano and the following controversy about the jazz musicians’ use of town hall facilities. From this incident New Zealand Herald cartoonist Gordon Minhinnick responded with a cartoon and a comic strip about the debate. By examining Minhinnick’s contributions via the lens of cultural history we can apprehend the shape of this dispute (politically and culturally), how it impacted Auckland society, and also gain a sense about how jazz was perceived by society at large at that time. We can also see how Minhinnick used the debate to illustrate other important political issues facing Auckland at the time.

Keywords: history,  jazz,  jazz concert,  New Zealand,  politics 

How to Cite: Ward, A., (2016). New Zealand Jazz Concerts, the Use and Abuse of Grand Pianos, and One Cartoonist’s Response. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship. 6, p.10. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.75

Published: 23 August 2016.

Copyright: © 2016 Aleisha Ward. This is a peer reviewed open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (CC BY 4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. See http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. Third-party content is included in the article for research and educational purposes only under Academic Fair Dealing/Fair Use. Unless otherwise stated all third-party content is copyright its original owners; all images of and references to characters and comic art presented on the article or the site(s) are ©, ® or ™ their respective owners.

Even though this particular collection is now closed to new submissions, The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship receives submissions on an ongoing basis. More information at http://www.comicsgrid.com/about/submissions/.

The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship is a peer-reviewed open access journal published by the Open Library of Humanities [OLH]. Unlike many open-access publishers, the OLH does not charge any author fees. This does not mean that we do not have costs. Instead, our costs are paid by an international library consortium.

If your institution is not currently supporting the platform, we request that you ask your librarian to sign up. The OLH is extremely cost effective and is a not-for-profit charity. However, while we cannot function without financial support and we encourage universities to sign up, institutional commitment is not required to publish with us.


This update reshares information originally published on this post at The Comics Grid‘s blog.

A belated #Transitions4 Archive, and a post summarising some data about comics scholars on Twitter

 Comics Scholars on Twitter? Yeah, A Few…

A very long title to announce I have finally published an archive of #transitions4 (2013) I collected more than a year ago, and that I have published a post on The Comics Grid blog summarising some data from my archives of tweets from comics conferences this year. Links below.

A #transitions4 Archive. figshare.

http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.1252098

“Comics Scholars on Twitter? Yeah, A Few…” The Comics Grid blog, 26 November 2014.

 

Altmetrics data for Nature Communications articles by access type, Jan – Oct ’14

Euan Adie from Altmetric has published a very interesting article with insights into a dataset of Nature Communications articles published between October 2013 and October 2014. I uploaded an edited version of his set as a spreadsheet on figshare.

Adie, Euan (2014): Attention! A study of open access vs non-open access articles. figshare. http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.1213690

Adie, Euan (2014): Altmetrics data for Nature Communications articles, Oct ’13 – Oct ’14. figshare. http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.1213687

 

 Euan found that
Open access articles, at least those in Nature Communications, do seem to generate significantly more tweets – including tweets from people who tweet research semi-regularly – and attract more Mendeley readers than articles that are reader pays.
I took his dataset from figshare and opened the .txt file using Excel. Using filters I deleted the 2013 articles and only focused on the ones published between January and October 2014. I sorted them by month of publication from January to October and separated them into two sheets, one for the open access articles and another one for the paywalled ones. This way one can use this spreadsheet to access the open access articles without having to sort through the paywalled ones. Or one can just do an individual analysis per type of access. This is of course super rudimentary data refining (if it can be called that), but it helped me to focus on the differences between access types published this year.
The resulting edited file has two sheets organized by type of access and month of publication, including only articles published during 2014.  (Note: seven (7) records appearing incorrectly as published 1900-1 under the month column were removed. They had no online mentions).

Manual manipulation of the original data was performed so all data should be contrasted with the original source cited above.

The intention of sharing this edited file is to aid in focusing on the open access and paywalled outputs published between January to October 2014 as provided in the original dataset. Having a smaller dataset organized by date and type of access may make quick visualisations easier.

Priego, Ernesto (2014): Altmetrics data for Nature Communications articles by access type, Jan – Oct ’14. figshare http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.1213719

Nature Communications Articles Published in September 2014 By Access Type

 September 2014 Nature Communications Articles by Altmetric Score