This was 2019 in The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship (Vol. 9)

Comics Grid logo

It’s that time of the year and at The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship we are closing our 9th volume, corresponding to 2019. We are getting ready for the holidays and next year.

Here’s a listing of the articles we published during 2019 by section:

Research

Lipenga, K.J., 2019. The New Normal: Enfreakment in Saga. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.2. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.161

Davies, P.F., 2019. New Choices of the Comics Creator. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.3. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.153

Grant, P., 2019. The Board and the Body: Material Constraints and Style in Graphic Narrative. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.4. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.145

del Rey Cabero, E., 2019. Beyond Linearity: Holistic, Multidirectional, Multilinear and Translinear Reading in Comics. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.5. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.137

McGovern, M. and Eve, M.P., 2019. Information Labour and Shame in Farmer and Chevli’s Abortion Eve. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.6. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.158

Hornsby, I., 2019. …Comic Books, Möbius Strips, Philosophy and…. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.7. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.151

Pickering, T., 2019. Diabetes Year One. Drawing my Pathography: Comics, Poetry and the Medical Self. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.8. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.147

Hagan, R.J., 2019. Touch Me/Don’t Touch Me: Representations of Female Archetypes in Ann Nocenti’s Daredevil. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.9. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.148

Misemer, L., 2019. A Historical Approach to Webcomics: Digital Authorship in the Early 2000s. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.10. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.162

Tan, X., 2019. Guoxue Comics: Visualising Philosophical Concepts and Cultural Values through Sequential Narratives. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.11. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.149

Austin, H.J., 2019. “That Old Black Magic”: Noir and Music in Juan Díaz Canales and Juanjo Guarnido’s Blacksad. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.12. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.156

Kottas, L. and Schwarzenbacher, M., 2019. The Comic at the Crossroads: The Semiotics of ‘Voodoo Storytelling’ in The Hole: Consumer Culture Vol. 1. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.13. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.150

Dodds, N., 2019. The Practice of Authentication: Adapting Pilgrimage from Nenthead into a Graphic Memoir. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.14. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.154

Manouach, I., 2019. Peanuts minus Schulz: Distributed Labor as a Compositional Practice. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.16. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.139

D’Arcy, J., 2019. Troubling Boundaries and Negotiating Dominant Culture: Fun Home as a Transmedial Text. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.17. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.146

Review

Evans, J., 2019. Challenging Adaptation Studies: A Review of Comics and Adaptation. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.1. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.159

Commentary

Christmas, S., 2019. The Citi Exhibition Manga マンガ (British Museum, 2019). The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.15. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.181

Creating Comics, Creative Comics

As you can see from the list above for us in the journal our 9th volume had a strong focus on the Special Collection: Creating Comics, Creative Comics.

The collection expanded on the themes of the symposium held in June 2018 at the University of South Wales, Cardiff.

Edited by Geraint D’Arcy (University of South Wales), Brian Fagence (University of South Wales) and Yours Truly (City, University of London), this collection sought to explore the dilemmas and potentials of construction and creation, ideology and authorship, philosophies and embodiment, histories and practices. It’s been both a pleasure and an honour to collaborate with Geraint and Brian and all the authors and reviewers. An editorial rounding up the collection is forthcoming next year.

Articles published in this collection were listed at https://www.comicsgrid.com/collections/special/creating-comics-creative-comics/.

Contribute

The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship seeks scholarly submissions on the technical, theoretical, cultural, and historical aspects of comics studies that gives vitality to the form and challenges readers’ assumptions about it.

Our current call for papers was published on 30th October 2019 on the journal web site and it is available to download as a PDF from figshare:

Priego, E.; Wilkins, P.; Dunley, K. (2019): The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship: Call for Papers 2019-2020. City, University of London. Online resource. https://doi.org/10.25383/city.10100252.v1

If you are interested in submitting work for review or you just want to find out more about the journal, or catch up with all our previous volumes, please do click on https://www.comicsgrid.com/!

It must be said again: the Journal is only possible because of the work volunteered by our editors, reviewers and authors: thank you all!

I would also like to thank the Open Library of Humanities (https://www.openlibhums.org/) for their ongoing support: without their funding we wouldn’t be able to do what we do.

We always need academic reviewers. If you would like to become a peer reviewer, please register, including enough details of your areas of expertise, at https://www.comicsgrid.com/author/register/reviewer/.

Wishing you all a very happy Christmas and an excellent new year 2020! Looking forward to The Comics Grid’s 10th volume!

This was January-August 2019 at The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship

Comics Grid logo

Here’s a listing of the articles we have published so far in 2019 in the journal (our 9th volume!) until the 30th of August 2019.

Research

Lipenga, K.J., 2019. The New Normal: Enfreakment in Saga. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.2. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.161

Davies, P.F., 2019. New Choices of the Comics Creator. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.3. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.153

Grant, P., 2019. The Board and the Body: Material Constraints and Style in Graphic Narrative. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.4. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.145

del Rey Cabero, E., 2019. Beyond Linearity: Holistic, Multidirectional, Multilinear and Translinear Reading in Comics. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.5. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.137

McGovern, M. and Eve, M.P., 2019. Information Labour and Shame in Farmer and Chevli’s Abortion Eve. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.6. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.158

Hornsby, I., 2019. …Comic Books, Möbius Strips, Philosophy and…. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.7. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.151

Pickering, T., 2019. Diabetes Year One. Drawing my Pathography: Comics, Poetry and the Medical Self. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.8. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.147

Hagan, R.J., 2019. Touch Me/Don’t Touch Me: Representations of Female Archetypes in Ann Nocenti’s Daredevil. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.9. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.148

Misemer, L., 2019. A Historical Approach to Webcomics: Digital Authorship in the Early 2000s. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.10. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.162

Tan, X., 2019. Guoxue Comics: Visualising Philosophical Concepts and Cultural Values through Sequential Narratives. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.11. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.149

Austin, H.J., 2019. “That Old Black Magic”: Noir and Music in Juan Díaz Canales and Juanjo Guarnido’s Blacksad. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.12. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.156

Kottas, L. and Schwarzenbacher, M., 2019. The Comic at the Crossroads: The Semiotics of ‘Voodoo Storytelling’ in The Hole: Consumer Culture Vol. 1. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.13. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.150 

Dodds, N., 2019. The Practice of Authentication: Adapting Pilgrimage from Nenthead into a Graphic Memoir. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.14. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.154

Review

Evans, J., 2019. Challenging Adaptation Studies: A Review of Comics and Adaptation. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.1. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.159

Commentary

Christmas, S., 2019. The Citi Exhibition Manga マンガ (British Museum, 2019). The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.15. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.181

Creating Comics, Creative Comics

As you can see from the list above for us in the journal this year has had a strong focus on the Special Collection: Creating Comics, Creative Comics.

The collection expands on the themes of the symposium held in June 2018 at the University of South Wales, Cardiff.

Edited by Geraint D’Arcy (University of South Wales),  Brian Fagence (University of South Wales) and Yours Truly (City, University of London), this collection seeks to explore the dilemmas and potentials of construction and creation, ideology and authorship, philosophies and embodiment, histories and practices. It’s been both a pleasure and an honour to collaborate with Geraint and Brian and all the authors and reviewers.

Articles published in this collection are listed at https://www.comicsgrid.com/collections/special/creating-comics-creative-comics/ .

More articles to come!

Please note that we are currently closed for submissions until 1st November 2019. Please keep an eye on Twitter and our journal web site for news. We are currently working in drafting our new Call for Papers with revised guidelines.

If you are interested in submitting work for review or you just want to find out more about the journal, or catch up with all our previous volumes, please do click on https://www.comicsgrid.com/!

We always need academic reviewers. If you would like to become a peer reviewer, please register, including enough details of your areas of expertise, at https://www.comicsgrid.com/author/register/reviewer/.

 

Oligopolies of Knowledge, {Digital Humanities} and Open Access: Looking at Scopus from the Global South… [form the North]

Oligopolies of Knowledge, {Digital Humanities} and Open Access: Looking at Scopus from the Global South… [form the North]

 

To download and cite the slides: Priego, Ernesto (2019): Oligopolies of Knowledge, {Digital Humanities} and Open Access: Looking at Scopus from the Global South… [form the North]. figshare. Presentation. https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.8850863

Presentation for P-11: Society, Media, Politics, Engagement Time: Wednesday, 10/Jul/2019: 4:00pm – 5:30pm Session Chair: Amelia Sanz DH2019 Conference, Utrecht, the Netherlands. Location: Pandora Zaal Part of the panel: Twining Digital Humanities and Humanidades Digitales: A set of actual experiences from the South.

All the slides from the panel can be viewed and/or downloaded and cited from:

Fiormonte, Domenico; Numerico, Teresa; Priego, Ernesto; Rodríguez-ortega, Nuria; Sanz, Amelia; Sapiera, Eugenia (2019): Twining Digital Humanities and Humanidades Digitales: A Set of Actual Experiences from the South [Slides]. figshare. Presentation. https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.8874998

Spring has sprung: The Comics Grid Volume 9 (2019) so far

[Comics Grid Spring 2019 Newsletter text below]

Please note our 31st March deadline has now passed.

Due to the high volume of submissions, please note that we are now closed for submissions until 1st November 2019.

Below you will find a listing of the articles published so far in Volume 9 (2019).

We will continue publishing throughout the year as part of Volume 9- keep an eye on the journal’s site (https://www.comicsgrid.com/) and our Twitter account (@ComicsGrid) for new article updates.

Volume 9 (2019) so far:

Lipenga, K.J., 2019. The New Normal: Enfreakment in Saga. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.2. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.161

Davies, P.F., 2019. New Choices of the Comics Creator. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.3. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.153

Grant, P., 2019. The Board and the Body: Material Constraints and Style in Graphic Narrative. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.4. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.145

del Rey Cabero, E., 2019. Beyond Linearity: Holistic, Multidirectional, Multilinear and Translinear Reading in Comics. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.5. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.137

McGovern, M. and Eve, M.P., 2019. Information Labour and Shame in Farmer and Chevli’s Abortion Eve. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.6. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.158

Evans, J., 2019. Challenging Adaptation Studies: A Review of Comics and Adaptation. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 9(1), p.1. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.159

You can catch up with our Volume 8 (2018) here: https://www.comicsgrid.com/7/volume/8/issue/0/

 


We are always in need of more expert reviewers. If you are a self-defined comics scholar or scholar with an interest in comics, have a PhD or are about to get one, you can do peer review for us.

Please register here indicating your areas of expertise.

If you are an author interested in submitting an article for consideration to The Comics Grid, you can start by learning about our submission guidelines. We will re-open our call for submissions on the 1st of November 2019.

Subscribe to the Comics Grid Newsletter at http://eepurl.com/iOYAj

We will continue publishing throughout the year as part of Volume 9- keep an eye on the journal’s site (https://www.comicsgrid.com/) and our Twitter account (@ComicsGrid) for new article updates.

2018: A Very Good Year for The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship

This year we broke our own record and published a total of 18 articles during 2018. I cannot say it enough: the Journal is only possible because of the work volunteered by our editors, reviewers and authors: thank you all!

I would also like to thank the Open Library of Humanities (https://www.openlibhums.org/) for their ongoing support: without their funding we wouldn’t be able to do what we do.

Here’s a listing of the articles we published during 2018, our 8th volume, by section:

Research

Rageul, A., 2018. On the Pleasure of Coding Interface Narratives. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 8, p.3. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.107

Dell’Angelo, T. and DeGenova, M., 2018. “I am a Teacher”: Early Career Teachers in High Needs Schools. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 8, p.5. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.115

Baudry, J., 2018. Paradoxes of Innovation in French Digital Comics. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 8, p.4. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.108

Wysocki, L., 2018. Farting Jellyfish and Synergistic Opportunities: The Story and Evaluation of Newcastle Science Comic. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 8, p.6. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.119

Gavaler, C., 2018. Undemocratic Layout: Eight Methods of Accenting Images. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 8, p.8. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.102

Verstappen, N., 2018. Prayoon Chanyawongse’s Cartoon Likay: Amalgamating Likay Theatrical Form and Comics into a Unique Thai Genre. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 8, p.9. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.121

Kowalewski, H., 2018. Heart is for Love: Cognitive Salience and Visual Metonymies in Comics. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 8, p.10. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.117

Zhu, A., Phuong, M. and Giacobbe, P., 2018. The Story of ECT: Behind the Scenes of a Controversial yet Effective Treatment. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 8, p.13. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.129

Rifkind, C., 2018. Geneviève Castrée’s Unmade Beds: Graphic Memoir and Digital Afterlives. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 8, p.14. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.128

Priego, E. and Wilkins, P., 2018. The Question Concerning Comics as Technology: Gestell and Grid. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 8, p.16. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.133

Farinella, M., 2018. Of Microscopes and Metaphors: Visual Analogy as a Scientific Tool. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 8, p.18. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.130

Review

Gröppel-Wegener, A., 2018. Raiding the Superhero Wardrobe: A Review of The Superhero Costume – Identity and Disguise in Fact and Fiction. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 8, p.1. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.122

Bessette, L.S., 2018. We’re All YA Now: A Review of Graphic Novels for Children and Young Adults. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 8, p.2. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.124

Davies, P.F., 2018. Enacting Graphic Mark-Making: A Review of A Theory of Narrative Drawing. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 8, p.7. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.127

Priego, E., 2018. The Comics Page: Scholarly Books Briefly Noted (2017–2018). The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 8, p.11. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.136

Murel, J., 2018. On the Significance of the Graphic Novel to Contemporary Literary Studies: A Review of The Cambridge Companion to the Graphic Novel. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 8, p.15. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.138

Simmons, T.E., 2018. Unmasked Lex Text: A Review of On Comics and Legal Aesthetics – Multimodality and the Haunted Mask of Knowing. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 8, p.17. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.134

Interview

Giddens, T., 2018. “I’m Aware that a Lot of these People that I’m Feeling Sorry for are Wankers”: A Conversation with Hannah Berry. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, 8, p.12. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.132


Other Grid-related News

Honourable Mention

This year fellow co-conspirator Dr Peter Wilkins and I received an Open Scholarship Award 2018 Honorable Mention for their Comics Grid editorial work. The Open Scholarship Awards are sponsored by the Canadian Social Knowledge Institute and its partners. The announcement was published on 13 April 2018 by the Electronic Textual Cultures Lab (University of Victoria, Canada). We were literally honoured.

Featured in Open Insights

I’d also like to hank you to Martin Eve and James Smith from the Open Library of Humanities for interviewing me for their Open Insights series, part of their EmpowOA programme. The URL for the interview is: https://www.openlibhums.org/news/275/. Make sure to follow the #EmpowOA hashtag for the whole series. Find out more about the Open Library of Humanities’ EmpowOA programme here.

Editorial Work Experience

This year we also started collaborating with the Creative Writing and Publishing MA Programme at City, University of London by offering our first editorial work experience placement for a postgraduate student. Angelica Curzi started her placement in December 2018. Welcome to the team, Angelica!


Articles received by or after our second yearly editorial deadline (October 2018) have been under review and editorial processes will restart from January 2019.

We completely appreciate scholarly publishing can be a frustrating affair- if you submitted work during 2018 and your submission is still under review (or was accepted but due to be published in 2019) please accept our gratitude for your patience and understanding.

After 8 years we remain a relatively small, volunteer-led scholarly publishing operation, and the volume of submissions this year increased significantly, with 2018 being our busiest year so far, which has meant longer waiting times for authors. This is far from ideal, but we keep working hard to find ways to continue engaging in faster and more efficient and rigorous editorial processes. Thank you once again for bearing with us.

If you are interested in submitting work for review or you just want to find out more about the journal, or catch up with all our previous volumes, please do click on https://www.comicsgrid.com/!

We are also in constant need for academic reviewers. If you would like to become a peer reviewer, please register, including your areas of expertise, at https://www.comicsgrid.com/author/register/reviewer/.

Here’s looking forward to a 2019 full of open access comics scholarship!

To be continued…


[This post was adapted from an email campaign I sent to the Comics Grid newsletter list yesterday. You can subscribe to the Comics Grid Newsletter at http://eepurl.com/iOYAj].

 

The 2018 Altmetric Top 100 Outputs with ‘Comics’ as Keyword

As it’s that time of the year and Altmetric has released its 2018 Top 100, in this post I share the 2018 Top 100 research outputs with ‘comics’ as a keyword according to Altmetric.

I queried the data from the Altmetric Explorer, looking for all outputs with this keyword between 13/12/2017 and 13/12/2018. I then refined the data to concentrate only on the Top 100 outputs about comics.

To see the complete Top 100, you can download the dataset I shared on figshare at https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.7467116.v1.

Below you can quickly take a look at the top 20 outputs with keyword “comics” ordered by their Altmetric Attention score :

Altmetric Attention Score Title Journal/Collection Title Publication Date
524 Ten simple rules for drawing scientific comics PLoS Computational Biology 04/01/2018
286 Comixify: Transform video into a comics 09/12/2018
154 Teaching Confidentiality through Comics at One Spanish Medical School AMA Journal of Ethics 01/02/2018
99 Bruised and Battered: Reinforcing Intimate Partner Violence in Comic Books Feminist Criminology 17/05/2018
84 Of Microscopes and Metaphors: Visual Analogy as a Scientific Tool The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship 10/10/2018
79 The potential of comics in science communication JCOM – Journal of Science Communication 23/01/2018
65 Alter egos: an exploration of the perspectives and identities of science comic creators JCOM – Journal of Science Communication 16/01/2018
61 Using comics to change lives The Lancet 01/01/2018
50 The Question Concerning Comics as Technology: Gestell and Grid The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship 24/09/2018
47 A survey of comics research in computer science 16/04/2018
41 Is There a Comic Book Industry? Media Industries 05/06/2018
38 The Utility of Multiplex Molecular Tests for Enteric Pathogens: a Micro-Comic Strip Journal of Clinical Microbiology 24/01/2018
38 Farting Jellyfish and Synergistic Opportunities: The Story and Evaluation
of Newcastle Science Comic
The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship 20/03/2018
35 Pitfalls in Performing Research in the Clinical Microbiology Laboratory: a Micro-Comic Strip Journal of Clinical Microbiology 25/09/2018
34 Neural Comic Style Transfer: Case Study 05/09/2018
31 Comics and the Ethics of Representation in Health Care … AMA Journal of Ethics AMA Journal of Ethics 01/02/2018
29 Undemocratic Layout: Eight Methods of Accenting Images The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship 25/05/2018
29 Communicating Science through Comics: A Method Publications 30/08/2018
26 Of Cornopleezeepi and Party Poopers: A Brief History of Physicians in Comics … AMA Journal of Ethics AMA Journal of Ethics 01/02/2018
26 On the Significance of the Graphic Novel to Contemporary Literary Studies: A Review of The Cambridge Companion to the Graphic Novel The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship 19/09/2018
DOI Altmetric Details Page URL
10.1371/journal.pcbi.1005845 https://www.altmetric.com/details/31266263
https://www.altmetric.com/details/52485006
10.1001/journalofethics.2018.20.2.medu1-1802 https://www.altmetric.com/details/32564583
10.1177/1557085118772093 https://www.altmetric.com/details/41904868
10.16995/cg.130 https://www.altmetric.com/details/49471637
10.22323/2.17010401 https://www.altmetric.com/details/32104944
10.22323/2.17010201 https://www.altmetric.com/details/31748235
10.1016/s0140-6736(17)33258-0 https://www.altmetric.com/details/31292645
10.16995/cg.133 https://www.altmetric.com/details/48839521
https://www.altmetric.com/details/37717650
10.3998/mij.15031809.0005.102 https://www.altmetric.com/details/43846275
10.1128/jcm.01916-17 https://www.altmetric.com/details/32171741
10.16995/cg.119 https://www.altmetric.com/details/34631498
10.1128/jcm.01144-18 https://www.altmetric.com/details/48881364
https://www.altmetric.com/details/47890394
10.1001/journalofethics.2018.20.2.fred1-1802 https://www.altmetric.com/details/32521484
10.16995/cg.102 https://www.altmetric.com/details/42619367
10.3390/publications6030038 https://www.altmetric.com/details/47265663
10.1001/journalofethics.2018.20.2.mhst1-1802 https://www.altmetric.com/details/32529286
10.16995/cg.138 https://www.altmetric.com/details/48647607

To see the complete Top 100, you can download the dataset I shared on figshare at https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.7467116.v1.

I am obviously very pleased to see The Comics Grid included in the Top 100.

It is interesting to note the diversity of countries associated to the profiles (where the metadata was available) giving attention to the outputs. According to Altmetric, there were 4,588 tweets about research outputs with ‘comics’ as keyword between 13/12/17 and 13/12/18 by 2,866 unique tweeters in 98 different countries. The map looks like this:

Countries and Number of Profiles that Gave Attention to Research Outputs with 'Comics' Keyword between 13/12/17 and 13/12/18 according to Altmetric. Chart by Altmetric Explorer.
Countries and Number of Profiles that Gave Attention to Research Outputs with ‘Comics’ Keyword between 13/12/17 and 13/12/18 according to Altmetric. Chart by Altmetric Explorer.

 

I shared the countries data on figshare at https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.7467455.v1.

For more information and context on Altmetric and using the Altmetric Explorer, see my 2016 post here. Many other posts about alternative metrics and the Altmetric Explorer can be found throghout my blog.

References

Priego, Ernesto (2018): Altmetric Top 100 Outputs with ‘Comics’ Keyword between 13/12/17 and 13/12/18. figshare. Dataset. https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.7467116.v1

Priego, Ernesto (2018): Countries and Number of Profiles that Gave Attention to Research Outputs with ‘Comics’ Keyword between 13/12/17 and 13/12/18 according to Altmetric. figshare. Dataset. https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.7467455.v1

Presenting at Open Access in the Humanities, University of Ljubljana

Open Access in the Humanities, : University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Arts

I will be presenting at the event Open Access in the Humanities event that will take place at the Faculty of Arts of the University of Ljubljana on 22 May 2018.

I will be participating in a panel discussion titled “How to establish open access in Slovenian academic publishing and researching?”.

The information and programme in English is available at http://www.ff.uni-lj.si/an/books/open_access_humanities.

Video streaming will also be available at the web page for the event (link above).

I would like to thank the Open Library of Humanities and the Faculty of Arts of the University of Ljubljana for making it possible for me to attend this event.

Open Library of Humanities logo

 

#ELPUB2018: Deadline Extended to 31 January

elpub

Deadline for submission of extended abstracts for full papers and other
presentations is being extended to 31 January 2018.

International Conference on Electronic Publishing 2018 (ELPUB)
Connecting the Knowledge Commons: From Projects to Sustainable
Infrastructure
June 22-24, 2018
University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada
http://elpub.net

Full disclosure: I am a member of the programme committee.

ELPUB 2018 marks the 22nd edition of the International Conference in ELectronic PUBlishing and the 10th anniversary of the meeting being held in Toronto.

For over two decades, ELPUB has featured research and innovations in digital publishing, with a focus on transforming the nature of scholarly communication. The conference has attracted a diverse international community of librarians, developers, publishers, entrepreneurs, administrators and researchers across the disciplines in the sciences and the humanities.

The theme for ELPUB 2018 is Connecting the Knowledge Commons: From Projects to Sustainable Infrastructure. The question of sustainability in the open access movement has been widely debated, but satisfactory answers and long term solutions have yet to be generated.

Market-driven versions of open access and open science are growing in prevalence, as well as a growing dependence on commercial publishers for the infrastructures needed to openly and democratically create and communicate knowledge.

This year¹s theme challenges us to collaborate on the design and implementation of a sustainable community-driven research communication infrastructure that is also inclusive of diverse forms of knowledge making and sharing.

The conference program committee invites contributions from members of the community whose research and experiments are focused on sustainability models for community based open infrastructure, trust and governance of the Knowledge Commons, and transforming the nature of scholarly communications.

If you are interested in sharing your research, ideas, and tools that contribute to the theme or just join in the discussion, please consider participating!

Learn more about the scope of the conference at:
http://epress.utsc.utoronto.ca/elpub2018/call-for-papers/

Sign up for our e-newsletter to stay up to date on the latest conference
news: goo.gl/memGLc or Follow us on Twitter @elpub_conf.

Conference Co-chairs
Leslie Chan <chan@utsc.utoronto.ca>
Pierre Mounier <pierre.mounier@openedition.org>

The Comics Grid: 2017 So Far

2017: A Very Good Year

We know you are busy. It’s been quite a year for everyone. For us at The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship it’s been a very busy year with submissions all year round.

We’d like to thank you all for your readership and engagement. We are infinitely grateful to all our editors, reviewers and authors: thank you! We would also like to thank the Open Library of Humanities for their ongoing support: without their funding we wouldn’t be able to do what we do.

Here’s a listing of the articles we have published so far in 2017 (our 7th volume!), until the 22nd of December:

Research

Ursini, F.-A., (2017). David Bowie’s Influence on JoJo’s Bizarre Adventure. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship. 7, p.1. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.95

Ursini, F.-A., (2017). Themes, Focalization and the Flow of Information: The Case of Shingeki no Kyojin. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship. 7, p.2. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.83

Juricevic, I., (2017). Aladdin Sane and Close-Up Eye Asymmetry: David Bowie’s Contribution to Comic Book Visual Language. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship. 7, p.4. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.94

Humphrey, A., (2017). The Cult of Krazy Kat: Memory and Recollection in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship. 7, p.8. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.97

Earle, H., (2017). Framing Violence and Serial Murder in My Friend Dahmer and Green River Killer. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship. 7, p.5. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.99

Chung, M.-Y., (2017). The Humanity of the Zombie: A Case Study of a Korean Zombie Comic. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship. 7, p.6. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.81

Humphrey, A., (2017). The Cult of Krazy Kat: Memory and Recollection in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship. 7, p.8. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.97

Curtis, N., (2017). Doom’s Law: Spaces of Sovereignty in Marvel’s Secret Wars. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship. 7, p.9. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.90

Nurse, A., (2017). See No Evil, Print No Evil: The Criminalization of Free Speech in DMZ. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship. 7, p.10. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.88

Lee, J., (2017). Black Bleeds and the Sites of a Trauma in GB Tran’s Vietnamerica. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship. 7, p.12. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.104

Martin, C., (2017). With, Against or Beyond Print? Digital Comics in Search of a Specific Status. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship. 7, p.13. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.106

Botes, M., (2017). Using Comics to Communicate Legal Contract Cancellation. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship. 7, p.14. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.100

Fontaine, J., (2017). Illusion, Kayfabe, and Identity Performance in Box Brown and Brandon Easton’s Andre the Giant Graphic Biographies. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship. 7, p.17. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.96

Review

Labarre, N., (2017). Coming to Life: A Review of Movie Comics: Page to Screen/Screen to Page. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship. 7, p.3. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.105

Davies, D., (2017). A Review of Threadbare: Clothes, Sex and Trafficking. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship. 7, p.7. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.110

Godfrey, A.P., (2017). The Ethical Zombie: A Review of The Walking Med: Zombies and The Medical Image. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship. 7, p.11. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.112

Bussone, A., (2017). Experiencing the History of HIV/AIDS: A Review of Taking Turns. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship. 7, p.15. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.116

Clarke Gray, B., (2017). Cap the Chameleon: A Review of Captain America, Masculinity, and Violence. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship. 7, p.16. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.120

Interview

Davies, D., (2017). Comics Activism: An Interview with Comics Artist and Activist Kate Evans. The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship. 7, p.18. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/cg.114

Prize-winning Open Access Scholarship!

We were delighted to that Aleisha Ward’s article, “New Zealand Jazz Concerts, the Use and Abuse of Grand Pianos, and One Cartoonist’s Response”  won the prestigious Rebecca Coyle Prize this year. Read more about the prize here: https://www.openlibhums.org/news/266/

We also celebrated that Benoît Crucifix’s article, “Witnessing Fukushima Secondhand: Collage, Archive and Travelling Memory in Jacques Ristorcelli’s Les Écrans” won honorary mention at the inaugural Best Online Comics Studies Scholarship Award (BOCSS), announced at the Massachusetts Independent Comics Expo (MICE) 2017 at the Lesley University campus.

Many congratulations to both Aleisha and Benoît!

If you submitted work during 2017 and your submission is still under review please accept our gratitude for your patience and understanding. Believe us: we know how frustrating scholarly publishing can be. After 7 years we remain a relatively small operation, and the volume of submissions this year increased significantly, which has meant longer waiting times for authors. This is far from ideal, but we keep working hard to find ways to continue engaging in faster and more efficient and rigorous editorial processes. Thank you once again for bearing with us.

If you are interested in submitting work for review or you just want to find out more about the journal, or catch up with all our previous volumes, please do click on https://www.comicsgrid.com/!

We are also in constant need for academic reviewers. If you would like to become a peer reviewer, please register, including your areas of expertise, at https://www.comicsgrid.com/author/register/reviewer/.

Special thanks to Peter Wilkins, Nicolas Labarre, Benoît Crucifix , Thom Giddens, Lise Tannahill, Enrique del Rey, Ana Cristina de Lion, Sam Moore, Peter Ford, Abhijit Pathre, Andy Byers, Martin Eve, and Caroline Edwards, who made this such a good year for The Grid.

Here’s looking forward to a 2018 full of open access comics scholarship!

New: Scholarly Publishing, Freedom of Information and Academic Self-Determination

On February 1, 2015, the global information and analytics corporation Elsevier and the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) established the agreement UNAM-Elsevier contract DGAJ-DPI-39-081114- 241, which saw the transfer from UNAM to Elsevier for the “production and hosting, advertising and support” of 44 Mexican open access academic journals published by UNAM.

On Saturday 25 November 2017 we published a pre-print that documents said contract and describes a Freedom of Information Request enquiring the total cost of the contract and its corresponding response. It also shares a series of considerations that, based on this case, can be helpful to other institutions that may face similar circumstances in the future. We conclude scholarly publishing and academic self-determination are interdependent and a crucial point of future debate for the future of University presses and Open Access worldwide.

You can download the document from figshare at https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.5632657.v1.

Cite as:

Priego, Ernesto; McKiernan, Erin; Posada, Alejandro; Hartley, Ricardo; Rodríguez-ortega, Nuria; Fiormonte, Domenico; Gil, Alex; Logan, Corina; Alperin, Juan Pablo; Mounce, Ross; Eglen, Stephen; Trigueros, Ernesto Miranda; Lawson, Stuart; Gatto, Laurent; Ramos, Adela; Pérez, Natalia (2017): Scholarly Publishing, Freedom of Information and Academic Self-Determination: The UNAM-Elsevier Case. figshare.

https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.5632657.v1

I made a remote presentation on this article at OpenCon Santiago 2017, held at the Universidad Autónoma de Chile, on Saturday 25 2017. With many thanks to co-author Ricardo Hartley for making it possible.
Open Con Santiago 2017 logo

Pre-print, Post-print, Publisher’s Version: Who Cares and What Does It Mean for Open Access?

CC-BY-SA Jonathan McIntosh
CC-BY-SA Jonathan McIntosh

Doing research online on an everyday basis, more often than not I come across newspaper and magazine articles, blog posts, online CVs, postings on Academia and ResearchGate, tweets etc. that link to direct downloads to PDFs of very recent articles that do look like publisher’s versions of otherwise paywalled journal articles. Often they are indeed the publisher’s versions. (More on what ‘publisher’s version’ means below).

The reader clicks on a link and the joy of a free PDF download pops up on the reader’s screen. No questions asked.

This would require a much longer discussion, so this is just an initial contribution. The culture of direct links to PDF downloads irrespective of licensing within academia and to a more limited extent within journalism is troublesome for more than one reason.

I am not only refering here to so-called ‘dark social’ (Madrigal 2012) but to public sharing of deep links to PDF files that have often been re-hosted not on the publisher’s sites but on users’ personal cloud folders such as Dropbox folders and Google Drive. Enabling direct downloads to publisher’s versions of academic articles originally published online as paywalled articles circumvents the paywall, and renders said paywall (by definition a barrier) invisible to users. The direct link disconnects the PDF from the online record or full text HTML version on the journal’s web site. The article simply downloads onto our computers. Some think that if one is an Open Access advocate then one should be happy that research is being made available at all. To me it demonstrates a lack of understanding or willingness to be honest about the very restrictions that slow down the dissemination of scholarly work. Circumventing paywalls does not help to communicate why open access and therefore open licenses are so urgent in the first place.

It seems to me that in academic publishing it is indeed easier to ask forgiveness than it is to get permission, therefore there is widespread sharing of direct links to publisher’s version PDFs. Open Access seeks to legally create a culture of fairer, faster dissemination, exchange and reuse of academic publications, and I’ll argue here that the widespread tolerance of the circumvention of paywalls makes the case for Open Access much harder.If articles still circulate ‘freely’ amongst scholars and some members of the public through these direct links, it will not be clear to users what the problem with paywalled outputs is. As long as one is not in charge of a library budget, that is.

As journals and publishers seen as ‘reputable’ offer very expensive Open Access ‘options’ via article processing charges, many academics do not think twice about sticking to publishing their work as paywalled articles. Institutions, research officers and some (but not all) funders are happy for authors to paywall their outputs. In spite of being paywalled, these articles seem to continue being freely shared amongst those interested. (Grey areas around what is ‘fair dealing’ in educational networks do contribute to encourage the inter-academic sharing, at no cost nor friction to the receiver, of otherwise-paywalled PDFs). As a result many don’t wink at the fact there is a paywall somewhere on the main output online. Win-win, right? I think not.

In the 21st century, awareness of academic publishers’ copyright and self-archiving policies should be a key academic literacy. The publishing process is today, perhaps more than ever before, an integral component of the research life cycle. Publishing is not the work that strangers perform for authors; authors are directly embedded in the process and do take important decisions throughout that determine the ways in which research is produced, disseminated, consumed and potentially adopted or reused.

My view is that we need wider awareness of publishers’ and journals’ self-archiving and licensing policies. It is easy to find out what we as authors and readers can do online with published academic outputs.  SHERPA/RoMEO should be bookmarked on every academic’s browser’s tool bar; the user can simply search by journal title or ISSN. Below, as an example, you can see a screenshot of the information I got after searching for a journal’s ISSN:

screen-shot-2017-01-30-at-17-09-54

This is faster than trying to find out this information directly on the journal’s web site, but if there’s doubt it’s always a good idea to double check. The article that got me to check the journal policies above is paywalled, and I came across it as a direct PDF download via a newspaper article. Because of its formatting and layout characteristics and download watermark, the file that I obtained freely via a newspaper article appears to be a ‘Publisher’s Version/PDF’. According to SHERPA/RoMEO,  that particular journal requires that the ‘Publisher’s Version/PDF’ is embargoed for 12 months. (Alternatively, it is also also possible this particular journal asks authors to use the publisher-generated .pdf as Post-print, but I would have to check).

The ‘Pre-print’, ‘Post-print’ and even ‘Publisher’s Version/PDF’ terminology can be confusing. Luckily, SHERPA/RoMEO recognised this and has useful information that seeks to clarify what is meant by them (link):

To try to clarify the situation, this listing characterises pre-prints as being the version of the paper before peer review and post-prints as being the version of the paper after peer-review, with revisions having been made.

This means that in terms of content, post-prints are the article as published. However, in terms of appearance this might not be the same as the published article, as publishers often reserve for themselves their own arrangement of type-setting and formatting. Typically, this means that the author cannot use the publisher-generated .pdf file, but must make their own .pdf version for submission to a repository.

Having said that, some publishers insist that authors use the publisher-generated .pdf – seemingly because the publishers want their material to be seen as a professionally produced .pdf that fits with their own house-style.”

That apparently “some publishers insist that authors use the publisher-generated .pdf” contributes to the opacity of publishers’ licensing information and to authors’ and readers’ confusion whether we are legally allowed to share the publisher’s version at all (i.e. a ‘version of record’ that features the type-setting, layout and design of the professionally produced publication. For CrossRef’s definition of ‘Version of Record’, see their Glossary).

Some publishers have been known to send take-down notices to some authors, but it seems that publishers either don’t have the capacity to ensure license enforcement or intentionally tolerate the practice. As in other forms of piracy, in the end the sharing of publisher’s versions when the journal’s self-archiving policy does not allow it perpetuates the culture of brand reputation and the wider dissemination helps promote the brand. When good citation practice is followed, the published version’s DOI and or URL gets clicked on and cited without having been the location that enabled access to the full version of the article in the first place. The paywall remains, and the libraries (some libraries) keep paying the subscriptions. Meanwhile, many within academic networks get the papers without ever having to log in to their libraries.

Recently, so-called ‘hybrid’ journals (essentially paywalled journals that also offer Open Access options) have confused things further by making some articles ‘free’ (but not Open Access due to non-open licensing and temporary nature of the free access allowed). The journal may be enabling free downloads of an article, but that does not necessarily mean an author or anyone else is allowed to share the PDF freely for indefinite time too. The small print must be read at all times.

If we want more colleagues and students to understand the reasons behind Open Access we need to communicate better what the effects of restrictive policies such as embargoes are. If authors are not respecting the licensing terms they have signed, and therefore fail to see the disadvantages, it is hard to demonstrate why open licensing is needed.

This will sound prescriptive and it is likely to be an unpopular opinion, but if authors decide to publish their work as a paywalled article, then they need to be aware that links to direct downloads of the publisher’s version PDF are most likely not to be allowed by the journal’s policy -otherwise what is the point of the paywall and in reserving all rights?

If authors want to share freely not pre-prints nor post-prints but the publisher’s versions of their newly published articles, they can seek funding to pay (or seek waivers for) the Article Processing Charges (APCs) for Open Access options. Even better, authors could choose to submit to non-APC, fully-fledged Open Access journals. In other words, if authors want to share their shiny, professionally-produced PDF of their article, they should ensure they  have submitted to a journal with a copyright and self-archiving policy that allows such sharing.

Perhaps one of the main myths to debunk around Open Access is that it is an anti-copyright stance. It is quite the opposite. Precisely, it is because of an acute awareness of copyright and self-archiving policies why Open Access seeks to ensure there are legal and technological frameworks to enable academics to publish under more flexible paradigms. As long as the real, pragmatic obstacles to accessing and reusing academic research are avoided by most academics, it does feel like Open Access has a long, long road ahead.