The Lockdown Chronicles 40: Daniel

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Daniel tweets a thread.
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A Journal of the Plague Year by Daniel Defoe (1660–1731) was first published in March 1722. It is an account of one man’s experiences of the year 1665, in which the bubonic plague struck the city of London in what became known as the Great Plague of London [Wikipedia entry].

Text sources: BBC News (23 March 2020) “PM announces strict new curbs on life in UK”; BBC News (11 June 2020) “Coronavirus: Growing calls for government to scrap 2m rule”; Defoe, D. (1722) A Journal of the Plague Year: being observations or memorials, of the most remarkable occurrences, as well publick as private, which happened in London during the last great visitation in 1665. Written by a citizen who continued all the while in London. Never made publick before, via Project Gutenberg.

Source image: Portrait of Daniel Defoe, National Maritime Museum, London, author unknown, style of Sir Godfrey Kneller. Image in the public domain in its country of origin and other countries and areas where the copyright term is the author’s life plus 70 years or fewer, via Wikimedia Commons.
This comic strip CC-BY-NC-SA.

References

Gov.uk. Coronavirus (COVID-19) in the UK, available at https://coronavirus.data.gov.uk [Accessed 11 June 2020]

BC News. (23 March 2020) “PM announces strict new curbs on life in UK”. Available at https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-52012432 [Accessed 11 June 2020].

BBC News (11 June 2020) “Coronavirus: Growing calls for government to scrap 2m rule”. Available at https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-53003046 [Accessed 11 June 2020].

Defoe, D. (1722) A Journal of the Plague Year: being observations or memorials, of the most remarkable occurrences, as well publick as private, which happened in London during the last great visitation in 1665. Written by a citizen who continued all the while in London. Never made publick before. Available via Project Gutenberg at https://www.gutenberg.org/files/376/376-h/376-h.htm [Accessed 11 June 2020]

Barbican Living (n.d.) Daniel Defoe (1660 – 1731). Available at https://www.barbicanliving.co.uk/blocks/defoe-house/daniel-defoe-1660-1731/ [Accessed 11 June 2020]

Portrait of Daniel Defoe, National Maritime Museum, London, author unknown, style of Sir Godfrey Kneller. Via Wikimedia Commons at https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Daniel_Defoe_Kneller_Style.jpg Accessed 11 June 2020]

The Lockdown Chronicles is a series of periodical comic strips made at night (in candlelight!) adapting and reusing openly-licensed or public domain items from online digital collections. Publication and tweetage are scheduled in advance. Historical sources are adapted and updated for the current pandemic; please refer to each strip’s references on each post for further context.  Catch up with the series at https://epriego.blog/tag/the-lockdown-chronicles/.

The Lockdown Chronicles 39: Bernard

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Bernard checks Twitter.
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George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950), known at his insistence simply as Bernard Shaw, was an Irish playwright, critic, polemicist and political activist. His play The Doctor’s Dilemma was first staged in 1906. It is a problem play about the moral dilemmas created by limited medical resources, and the conflicts between the demands of private medicine as a business and a vocation [Wikipedia entry].

Source texts: Gabriel Scally @GabrielScally (9 June 2020, 8:52 PM BST). #COVID19 drive-in test centres run by Deloitte; contract tracing run by Serco, helped by Capita. I think George Bernard Shaw had something to say on the matter in 1911. #coronavirus. Tweet. Available from https://twitter.com/GabrielScally/status/1270443754613325824 [Accessed 9 June 2020]. Shaw, G. (1909) The Doctor’s Dilemma: Preface on Doctors, Project Gutenberg. Available via https://www.gutenberg.org/files/5069/5069-h/5069-h.htm [Accessed 9 June 2020]. Additional references below.

Source image: Photograph of Bernard Shaw writing in notebook at time of first production of his play “Pygmalion”, 1914. LIFE Photo Archive on Google, © Time Inc. Original for personal non-commercial use only.  Photo reused here under educational fair dealing via Wikimedia Commons. This comic strip CC-BY-NC-SA.

References

Gabriel Scally @GabrielScally (9 June 2020, 8:52 PM BST). #COVID19 drive-in test centres run by Deloitte; contract tracing run by Serco, helped by Capita. I think George Bernard Shaw had something to say on the matter in 1911. #coronavirus. Tweet. Available from https://twitter.com/GabrielScally/status/1270443754613325824 [Accessed 9 June 2020].

Shaw, G. (1909) The Doctor’s Dilemma: Preface on Doctors, Project Gutenberg. Available via https://www.gutenberg.org/files/5069/5069-h/5069-h.htm [Accessed 9 June 2020].

Taylor, D. (6 June 2020) “Serco wins Covid-19 test-and-trace contract despite £1m fine”. The Guardian. Available at https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/jun/06/serco-wins-covid-19-test-and-trace-contract-despite-1m-fine [Accessed 9 June 2020]

Garside, J. (23 April 2020) “Hospitals sound alarm over privately run virus test centre at Surrey theme park”. The Guardian. Available at https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/apr/23/hospitals-sound-alarm-over-privately-run-test-centre-in-surrey [Accessed 9 June 2020]

English Heritage. Blue Plaques. Shaw, George Bernard (1856-1950). Available at https://www.english-heritage.org.uk/visit/blue-plaques/george-bernard-shaw/ [Accessed 9 June 2020]

Photograph of Bernard Shaw writing in notebook at time of first production of his play “Pygmalion”, 1914. LIFE Photo Archive on Google, © Time Inc. Original for personal non-commercial use only.  Photo reused here under educational fair dealing via Wikimedia Commons, available at https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:George_Bernard_Shaw_notebook.jpg  [Accessed 9 June 2020]

 

The Lockdown Chronicles is a series of periodical comic strips made at night (in candlelight!) adapting and reusing openly-licensed or public domain items from online digital collections. Publication and tweetage are scheduled in advance. Historical sources are adapted and updated for the current pandemic; please refer to each strip’s references on each post for further context.  Catch up with the series at https://epriego.blog/tag/the-lockdown-chronicles/.

The Lockdown Chronicles 38: The Department of Health and Social Care

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The Department of Health and Social Care tweets.
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Source: Department of Health and Social Care. “As of 9am 6 June, there have been 5,438,712 tests, with 218,187 tests on 5 June. 284,868 people have tested positive. As of 5pm on 5 June, of those tested positive for coronavirus, across all settings, 40,465 have sadly died. More info at https://www.gov.uk/guidance/coronavirus-covid-19-information-for-the-public” Tweet. @DHSCgovuk 2:11 PM BST, June 6, 2020. Twitter Web App. Available from https://twitter.com/DHSCgovuk/status/1269255676020301824 [Accessed 6 June 2020].

This comic strip CC-BY-NC-SA.

 

References and additional resources

Department of Health and Social Care. “As of 9am 6 June, there have been 5,438,712 tests, with 218,187 tests on 5 June. 284,868 people have tested positive. As of 5pm on 5 June, of those tested positive for coronavirus, across all settings, 40,465 have sadly died.
More info at https://www.gov.uk/guidance/coronavirus-covid-19-information-for-the-public” Tweet. @DHSCgovuk 2:11 PM BST, June 6, 2020. Twitter Web App. Available from https://twitter.com/DHSCgovuk/status/1269255676020301824 [Accessed 6 June 2020].

Gov.uk. Coronavirus (COVID-19) in the UK, available at https://coronavirus.data.gov.uk [Accessed 6 June 2020]

Office for National Statistics, “Latest data and analysis on coronavirus (COVID-19) in the UK and its effect on the economy and society.” Available at  https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/healthandsocialcare/conditionsanddiseases [Accessed 6 June 2020]

Johns Hopkins University Coronavirus Resource Center, available at https://coronavirus.jhu.edu/ [Accessed 6 June 2020]

Sandle, P., and Faulconbridge, G. Reuters. (28 March 2020) World News.
“UK coronavirus death toll under 20,000 would be ‘good result’, says health chief”. Available fromhttps://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-coronavirus-britain/uk-coronavirus-death-toll-under-20000-would-be-good-result-says-health-chief-idUSKBN21F0HV . [Accessed 6 June 2020]

The Lockdown Chronicles is a series of periodical comic strips made at night (in candlelight!) adapting and reusing openly-licensed or public domain items from online digital collections. Publication and tweetage are scheduled in advance. Historical sources are adapted and updated for the current pandemic; please refer to each strip’s references on each post for further context.  Catch up with the series at https://epriego.blog/tag/the-lockdown-chronicles/.

The Lockdown Chronicles 37: Stuart

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Stuart is giving a webinar.
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Stuart Hall (Kingston, Jamaica, 1932– London, England, UK, 2014) was an influential British sociologist, cultural theorist, campaigner and founding editor of the New Left Review. Hall was one of the co-founders of the school of thought now known as British Cultural Studies or The Birmingham School of Cultural Studies [Wikipedia entry] [Guardian Obituary]

Text sources: UK Research and Innovation (27 May 2020) Why do people from ethnic minorities suffer more from COVID-19?. Available from https://coronavirusexplained.ukri.org/en/article/cad0011/ [Accessed 5 June 2020], CC-BY UKRI; Hall, S. (1991) “Old and New Identities, Old and New Ethnicities”, in Essential Essays, Volume 2: Identity and Diaspora, edited by David Morley, Duke University Press, 2018.

Source image: Portrait photograph of Stuart Hall (.ca 1985). Available publicly via the Open University Digital Archive under The Open University conditions of use, and reused here under fair dealing for educational use. © 2018 The Open University. This comic strip CC-BY-NC-SA

References

UK Research and Innovation (27 May 2020) Why do people from ethnic minorities suffer more from COVID-19?. Available from https://coronavirusexplained.ukri.org/en/article/cad0011/ [Accessed 5 June 2020]

Hall, S. (1991) “Old and New Identities, Old and New Ethnicities”, in Essential Essays, Volume 2: Identity and Diaspora, edited by David Morley, Duke University Press, 2018.

Stokes P. 2011 Census: Key Statistics and Quick Statistics for Local Authorities in the United Kingdom. Office for National Statistics. 2013 Oct. Available fromhttps://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/populationandmigration/populationestimates/bulletins/keystatisticsandquickstatisticsforlocalauthoritiesintheunitedkingdom/2013-10-11 [Accessed 5 June 2020]

Khunti K, Singh AK, Pareek M, Hanif W. Is ethnicity linked to incidence or outcomes of covid-19? BMJ. 2020 Apr;369:m1548. DOI: 10.1136/bmj.m1548.

The Lockdown Chronicles is a series of periodical comic strips made at night (in candlelight!) adapting and reusing openly-licensed or public domain items from online digital collections. Publication and tweetage are scheduled in advance. Historical sources are adapted and updated for the current pandemic; please refer to each strip’s references on each post for further context.  Catch up with the series at https://epriego.blog/tag/the-lockdown-chronicles/.

The Lockdown Chronicles 36: George

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Rest in Power, George Floyd.
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Rest in Power, George Perry Floyd (16 October 1973 – 25 May 2020). [Wikipedia entry].

We will not be satis­fied until justice rolls down like waters and righteousness like a mighty stream.”

– Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (1963).

Sign the AVAAZ public open letter against racism and police brutality: https://secure.avaaz.org/campaign/en/george_floyd_loc/ 

On #BlackOutTuesday: https://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/gadgets-and-tech/features/blackout-tuesday-instagram-black-squares-how-to-post-box-a9543896.html

This comic strip CC-BY-NC-SA

 

The Lockdown Chronicles is a series of periodical comic strips made at night (in candlelight!) adapting and reusing openly-licensed or public domain items from online digital collections. Publication and tweetage are scheduled in advance. Historical sources are adapted and updated for the current pandemic; please refer to each strip’s references on each post for further context.  Catch up with the series at https://epriego.blog/tag/the-lockdown-chronicles/.

 

The Lockdown Chronicles 35: Walter

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Walter livestreams.
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Walter Benjamin (1892–1940) was a German Jewish philosopher, cultural critic and essayist. Benjamin made enduring and influential contributions to aesthetic theory, literary criticism, and historical materialism. “Theses on the Philosophy of History” also known as “On the Concept of History” is often cited as Benjamin’s last complete work. The Institute for Social Research, by then relocated to New York, published it in Benjamin’s memory in 1942 [Wikipedia entry].

Text sources: Kwai, I. (1 June 2020). “U.S. Protests, Coronavirus, SpaceX: Your Monday Briefing”. The New York Times, NYT.com; ADPH Presidential Blog (31 May 2020) “ADPH Presidential Blog: “A time for steady leadership, careful preparation and measured steps”, https://www.adph.org.uk/; Benjamin, W. (2003) [1940] “On the Concept of History”, Selected Writings Vol. 4, Harvard.

Source image: photograph of Walter Benjamin, 1928, Akademie der Künste, Berlin, Walter Benjamin Archiv, via Wikimedia Commons. Public Domain. This comic strip CC-BY-NC-SA.

References

Kwai, I. (1 June 2020) “U.S. Protests, Coronavirus, SpaceX: Your Monday Briefing”. The New York Times. Available at https://www.nytimes.com/2020/06/01/briefing/us-protests-coronavirus-spacex.html [Accessed 1 June 2020]

ADPH Presidential Blog (31 May 2020) “ADPH Presidential Blog: A time for steady leadership, careful preparation and measured steps”. Available at https://www.adph.org.uk/2020/05/adph-presidential-blog-a-time-for-steady-leadership-careful-preparation-and-measured-steps/ [Accessed 1 June 2020]

Benjamin, W. (2003) [1940] “On the Concept of History”, Selected Writings Vol. 4, Harvard. Scanned PDF version via Warwick University at https://warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/english/currentstudents/undergraduate/modules/fulllist/second/en229/benjamin_on_the_concept_of_history.pdf  [Accessed 1 June 2020]. HTML version via Simon Fraser University at https://www.sfu.ca/~andrewf/CONCEPT2.html [Accessed 1 June 2020]

Photograph of Walter Benjamin in 1928, Akademie der Künste, Berlin, Walter Benjamin Archiv, via Wikimedia Commons, available at https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Walter_Benjamin_vers_1928.jpg [Accessed 1 June 2020]

Additional Readings

Tomlins, C. (1 December 2010) “Lessons of History”. Perspectives on History. Available via https://www.historians.org/publications-and-directories/perspectives-on-history/december-2010/lessons-of-history [Accessed 1 June 2020]

Kirsch, A. (14 August 2006) “The Philosopher Stoned”. The New Yorker. Available at https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2006/08/21/the-philosopher-stoned [Accessed 1 June 2020]

The Lockdown Chronicles is a series of periodical comic strips made at night (in candlelight!) adapting and reusing openly-licensed or public domain items from online digital collections. Publication and tweetage are scheduled in advance. Historical sources are adapted and updated for the current pandemic; please refer to each strip’s references on each post for further context.  Catch up with the series at https://epriego.blog/tag/the-lockdown-chronicles/.

The Lockdown Chronicles 34: Susan

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Susan chips in.
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Susan Sontag (1933–2004) was an American writer, filmmaker, philosopher, teacher, and political activist. She wrote extensively about photography, culture and media, cancer, AIDS and illness, human rights, and other topics [Wikipedia entry].

Text sources: Text sources: speech balloon in panel 1, United Nations Secretary-General Antonio Guterres, May 8, 2020, as quoted by Human Rights Watch (12 May 2020); captions in panels 1-3: Human Rights Watch (12 May 2020) Covid-19 Fueling Anti-Asian Racism and Xenophobia Worldwide, available via https://www.hrw.org/; speech balloons in panels 2-4: Sontag, Susan (1989). AIDS and Its Metaphors. Farrar, Straus and Giroux, New York.

Source image: photograph of Susan Sontag in her home in 1979, CC-BY Lynn Gilbert, via Wikimedia Commons. © Lynn Gilbert. This comic strip CC-BY-NC-SA

References

Human Rights Watch (12 May 2020) Covid-19 Fueling Anti-Asian Racism and Xenophobia Worldwide, available via https://www.hrw.org/news/2020/05/12/covid-19-fueling-anti-asian-racism-and-xenophobia-worldwide [Accessed 28 May 2020]

Sontag, S. (1989) AIDS and Its Metaphors. Farrar, Straus and Giroux, New York. Scanned version available via Monoskop at https://monoskop.org/File:Susan_Sontag_AIDS_and_Its_Metaphors_1989.pdf [PDF]. [Accessed 28 May 2020]

Gilbert, L. (1979).Photograph of Susan Sontag in her home. CC-BY Lynn Gilbert, via Wikimedia Commons at https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Susan_Sontag_1979_%C2%A9Lynn_Gilbert.jpg  © Lynn Gilbert. [Accessed 28 May 2020]

The Lockdown Chronicles is a series of periodical comic strips made at night (in candlelight!) adapting and reusing openly-licensed or public domain items from online digital collections. Publication and tweetage are scheduled in advance. Historical sources are adapted and updated for the current pandemic; please refer to each strip’s references on each post for further context.  Catch up with the series at https://epriego.blog/tag/the-lockdown-chronicles/.

 

The Lockdown Chronicles 33: Emmeline

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Emmeline is on FaceTime.
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Emmeline Pankhurst (1858–1928) was a British political activist best remembered for organising the UK suffragette movement and helping women win the right to vote [Wikipedia entry].

Text sources: Institute for Fiscal Studies (27 May 2020) “How are mothers and fathers balancing work and family under lockdown?”, available from https://www.ifs.org.uk/; Ascher, D. (27 May 2020) “Coronavirus: ‘Mums do most childcare and chores in lockdown”. BBC News; Emmeline Pankhurst’s “Freedom or death”, speech delivered in Hartford, Connecticut on November 13 1913, via The Guardian Great speeches of the 20th century, 27 April 2007.

Source image: Matzene, C. (1913) Emmeline Pankhurst. England United States, 1913. Nov. [Photograph] Women of Protest: Photographs from the Records of the National Woman’s Party, Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Public Domain. This comic strip CC-BY-NC-SA.

References

Institute for Fiscal Studies (27 May 2020) “How are mothers and fathers balancing work and family under lockdown?” Available at https://www.ifs.org.uk/publications/14860 [Accessed 27 May 2020]

Ascher, D. (27 May 2020) “Coronavirus: ‘Mums do most childcare and chores in lockdown”. BBC News. Available at https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-52808930 [Accessed 27 May 2020]

Pankhurstm E. (1913) “Freedom or death”, speech delivered in Hartford, Connecticut on November 13 1913, via The Guardian Great speeches of the 20th century, 27 April 2007. Available via https://www.theguardian.com/theguardian/2007/apr/27/greatspeeches [Accessed 27 May 2020]

Matzene, C. (1913) Emmeline Pankhurst. England United States, 1913. Nov. [Photograph] Women of Protest: Photographs from the Records of the National Woman’s Party, Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Retrieved from https://www.loc.gov/item/mnwp000042/ [Accessed 27 May 2020]

 

The Lockdown Chronicles is a series of periodical comic strips made at night (in candlelight!) adapting and reusing openly-licensed or public domain items from online digital collections. Publication and tweetage are scheduled in advance. Historical sources are adapted and updated for the current pandemic; please refer to each strip’s references on each post for further context.  Catch up with the series at https://epriego.blog/tag/the-lockdown-chronicles/.

The Lockdown Chronicles 32: Eglantyne

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Eglantyne gives a seminar.
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Eglantyne Jebb (1876–1928) was a British social reformer and teacher who co-founded Save the Children in 1919 to relieve the effects of famine in Austria-Hungary and Germany. She drafted the document that became the Declaration of the Rights of the Child (Mulley 2009) [Wikipedia entry].

Text sources in addition to those referenced in the caption footnotes: Mulley, C. (2009) The woman who saved the children: a biography of Eglantyne Jebb founder of Save the Children. Oxford: Oneworld; Adams, R. and Sample, I. (22 May 2020) “Ministers rejected school reopening plan recommended by Sage experts”. The Guardian; Weale, S. (15 May 2020). “Call for free school meals during half-term and summer in England”. The Guardian; Guardian staff and agencies (26 May 2020) “Global report: ‘disaster’ looms for millions of children as WHO warns of second peak”. The Guardian.

Source image: photograph of Eglantyne Jebb, photographer unknown, via Save the Children. License unknown. This comic strip CC-BY-NC-SA.

References

Office for National Statistics, “Latest data and analysis on coronavirus (COVID-19) in the UK and its effect on the economy and society.” Available at  https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/healthandsocialcare/conditionsanddiseases [Accessed 26 May 2020]

Change.org Petition: “Boris Johnson: Don’t take away lunches for 1​.​3 million kids on Free School Meals”. Available at https://www.change.org/p/boris-johnson-boris-johnson-don-t-take-away-lunches-for-1-3-million-kids-on-free-school-meals  [Accessed 26 May 2020]

Save the Children Coronavirus Appeal, available at https://www.savethechildren.org.uk/how-you-can-help/emergencies/donate-coronavirus-crisis [Accessed 26 May 2020]

Mulley, C. (2009) The woman who saved the children: a biography of Eglantyne Jebb founder of Save the Children. Oxford: Oneworld

Adams, R. and Sample, I. (22 May 2020) “Ministers rejected school reopening plan recommended by Sage experts”. The Guardian. Available at https://www.theguardian.com/education/2020/may/22/ministers-rejected-school-reopening-plan-recommended-by-sage-experts [Accessed 26 May 2020]

Weale, S. (15 May 2020). “Call for free school meals during half-term and summer in England”. The Guardian. Available at https://www.theguardian.com/education/2020/may/15/call-for-free-school-meals-during-half-term-summer-england [Accessed 26 May 2020]

Guardian staff and agencies (26 May 2020) “Global report: ‘disaster’ looms for millions of children as WHO warns of second peak”. The Guardian. Available at https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/may/26/global-report-disaster-looms-for-millions-of-children-as-who-warns-of-second-peak [Accessed 26 May 2020]

Photograph of Eglantyne Jebb, photographer unknown, via Save the Children, via alt.cardiff, 5 November 2019, available at https://www.jomec.co.uk/altcardiff/no-logo/save-the-children-continues-centenary-celebrations-at-llandaff-cathedral [Accessed 26 May 2020]

The Lockdown Chronicles is a series of periodical comic strips made at night (in candlelight!) adapting and reusing openly-licensed or public domain items from online digital collections. Publication and tweetage are scheduled in advance. Historical sources are adapted and updated for the current pandemic; please refer to each strip’s references on each post for further context.  Catch up with the series at https://epriego.blog/tag/the-lockdown-chronicles/.

The Lockdown Chronicles 31: Dr Doyle

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Dr Doyle has lunch.
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Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle (22 May 1859 – 7 July 1930), British writer and medical doctor, lived in South Norwood with his family 1891-1894. His first wife Louisa, was sometimes called “Touie”; she died in 1906. [Wikipedia entry] According to The Conan Doyle Estate, “the success of Sherlock Holmes made Conan Doyle a public figure in the 1890s, along with stories about medical practice’s social and ethical issues.” The Boer War (1899-1902) “crystalized his thinking about public issues, and role as a public man.” [The Conan Doyle Estate]

Text sources: Weaver, M., Dodd, V., and MacInnes, P. (23 May 2020) “Dominic Cummings clearly broke rules, says ex-police chief”, the Guardian; Syal, R., Weaver, M., and Walker, P. (24 May 2020) “Johnson’s defence of Cummings sparks anger from allies and opponents alike”, the Guardian; The Conan Doyle Estate, “Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Campaigner”, at https://arthurconandoyle.co.uk/campaigner.

Source images: panel 1: digital photograph of house of Sr Arthur Conan Doyle by Lucy Morris (24 May 2020), via Twitter, used with permission; panels 2-4: photograph of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle by Herbert Rose Barraud; carbon print on card mount; original at the National Portrait Gallery, London. Reused file via Wikimedia Commons, Public Domain in its country of origin and other countries and areas where the copyright term is the author’s life plus 100 years or fewer. The Conan Doyle Estate Ltd owns the trademark and common law rights in the name and image of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in the USA, European Union, U.K. and many other countries around the world. This comic strip CC-BY-NC-SA.

References

Weaver, M., Dodd, V., and MacInnes, P. (23 May 2020) “Dominic Cummings clearly broke rules, says ex-police chief”, the Guardian; available at https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2020/may/23/dominic-cummings-no-10-accused-of-covering-up-lockdown-breach [Accessed 25 May 2020]

Syal, R., Weaver, M., and Walker, P. (24 May 2020) “Johnson’s defence of Cummings sparks anger from allies and opponents alike”, the Guardian; available at https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2020/may/24/boris-johnson-defence-dominic-cummings-anger-from-allies-and-opponents-alike [Accessed 25 May 2020]

The Conan Doyle Estate, “Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Campaigner”, available at https://arthurconandoyle.co.uk/campaigner.[Accessed 25 May 2020]

English Heritage, “Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1859 – 1930)”. Blue Plaques. Available at https://www.english-heritage.org.uk/visit/blue-plaques/arthur-conan-doyle/  [Accessed 25 May 2020]

Travelling moose (@travellingmoose) (24 May 2020),  digital photograph of house of Sr Arthur Conan Doyle’s house in South Norwood, available at https://twitter.com/travellingmoose/status/1264554620275351552/photo/1 [Accessed 25 May 2020]

Barraud, H.R. Photograph of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in 1893, carbon print on card mount; original at the National Portrait Gallery, London. Reused file via Wikimedia Commons, available at https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Arthur_Conan_Doyle_by_Herbert_Rose_Barraud_1893.jpg  [Accessed 25 May 2020]

 

The Lockdown Chronicles is a series of periodical comic strips made at night (in candlelight!) adapting and reusing openly-licensed or public domain items from online digital collections. Publication and tweetage are scheduled in advance. Historical sources are adapted and updated for the current pandemic; please refer to each strip’s references on each post for further context.  Catch up with the series at https://epriego.blog/tag/the-lockdown-chronicles/.

The Lockdown Chronicles 30: Eric

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Eric is a newsreader.
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Eric Arthur Blair (1903–1950), better known by his pen name George Orwell, fled London’s smog for Jura on 10 April 1947 mostly for health reasons, where he worked on Nineteen Eighty-Four (1949). During that period he would be diagnosed with tuberculosis (Taylor 2003) [Wikipedia entry]

The masses never revolt of their own accord, and they never revolt merely because they are oppressed. Indeed, so long as they are not permitted to have standards of comparison, they never even become aware that they are oppressed. The recurrent economic crises of past times were totally unnecessary and are not now permitted to happen, but other and equally large dislocations can and do happen without having political results, because there is no way in which discontent can become articulate.”

-George Orwell, Nineteen Eighty-Four (1949)

Text sources: Taylor, D.J. (2003) Orwell: The Life. Henry Holt and Company; Sabbagh, D., Perraudin, F., Stewart, H., and Walker, P. (20 May 2020) “UK plans for contact-tracing in doubt as app not ready until June”. The Guardian; Hawkins, R (20 May 2020) “Coronavirus: Serco apologises for sharing contact tracers’ email addresses”. BBC Radio 4 Today. BBC News;  Perraudin, F. (20 May 2020) “No one had any idea’: Contact tracers lack knowledge about Covid-19 job”. The Guardian; Culnane, C., and Teague, V. (19 May 2020) Security analysis of the NHS COVID-19 App, StateofIT.

Source image: photograph of George Orwell at the BBC, photographer unknown, 1940, via Wikimedia Commons. Public Domain. This comic strip CC-BY-NC-SA.

 

References

Taylor, D.J. (2003) Orwell: The Life. Henry Holt and Company

Orwell, G. (1949) Nineteen Eighty-Four, via Internet Archive, available at https://archive.org/details/Orwell1984preywo/mode/2up [Accessed 20 May 2020]

Culnane, C., and Teague, V. (19 May 2020) Security analysis of the NHS COVID-19 App, available via  https://www.stateofit.com/UKContactTracing/ [Accessed 20 May 2020]

Sabbagh, D., Perraudin, F., Stewart, H., and Walker, P. (20 May 2020) “UK plans for contact-tracing in doubt as app not ready until June”. The Guardian; available at https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/may/20/uk-plans-for-contact-tracing-in-doubt-as-app-not-ready-until-june [Accessed 20 May 2020]

Hawkins, R (20 May 2020) “Coronavirus: Serco apologises for sharing contact tracers’ email addresses”. BBC Radio 4 Today. BBC News; available at https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-52732818# [Accessed 20 May 2020]

Perraudin, F. (20 May 2020) “No one had any idea’: Contact tracers lack knowledge about Covid-19 job”. The Guardian; available at https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/may/20/no-one-had-any-idea-contact-tracers-lack-knowledge-about-covid-19-job [Accessed 20 May 2020]

Photograph of George Orwell at the BBC, photographer unknown, 1940, via Wikimedia Commons, available at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Orwell#/media/File:George-orwell-BBC.jpg [Accessed 20 May 2020]

 

The Lockdown Chronicles is a series of periodical comic strips made at night (in candlelight!) adapting and reusing openly-licensed or public domain items from online digital collections. Publication and tweetage are scheduled in advance. Historical sources are adapted and updated for the current pandemic; please refer to each strip’s references on each post for further context.  Catch up with the series at https://epriego.blog/tag/the-lockdown-chronicles/.

The Lockdown Chronicles 29: Mary Jane

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Click on the image below to read the comic strip in full size. Sources and references on this post under the comic strip below.

Mary Jane wanted to be a nurse.
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Mary Seacole (née Mary Jane Grant, 1805, Kingston, Jamaica – 1881, London, UK), businesswoman who provided sustenance and care for British soldiers at the battlefront during the Crimean War. Despite her nursing experience during a cholera epidemic in Panama and in Jamaica caring for yellow fever victims, her offers to serve as an army nurse were refused. She attributed her rejection to racial prejudice (Seacole 1857: 74-80). After her death she fell into obscurity but in 2004 took first place in the 100 Great Black Britons poll in the UK. [Wikipedia entry] [Britannica entry]

In a 2014 letter to the Guardian, Professor Lynn McDonald, editor of the Collected Works of Florence Nightingale, wrote of Seacole that “[y]es, she was kind and generous, to ordinary soldiers as well as officers. These are good qualities, but not the sort that saves lives or pioneers health care” (Monday 27 October 2014).

It seems to me, as a humble reader, that all these years after her death Mary Seacole keeps suffering from the rejection she described experiencing in her 1857 autobiography (see chapter VIII).

Text sources: Syal, R. (18 May 2020) “Points-based UK immigration bill passes initial Commons stage”. The Guardian; Sparrow, A., Murphy, S. and Perraudin, F. (19 May 2020) “UK coronavirus live: excess deaths reached almost 55,000 in early May, says ONS”. The Guardian; Sample, I. (18 May 2020) “Over three-quarters of BAME doctors fear they will contract Covid-19”. The Guardian; Seacole, M. (2003)[1857] Wonderful Adventures of Mrs. Seacole in Many Lands, via Project Gutenberg.

Source image: Photograph of Mary Seacole c. 1873, unknown photographer, Maull & Company London, in the public domain in its country of origin and other countries and areas where the copyright term is the author’s life plus 70 years or fewer, via Wikimedia Commons. This comic strip CC-BY-NC-SA.

References

Syal, R. (18 May 2020) “Points-based UK immigration bill passes initial Commons stage”. The Guardian; https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2020/may/18/points-based-uk-immigration-bill-passed-by-parliament [Accessed 19 May 2020].

Sparrow, A., Murphy, S. and Perraudin, F. (19 May 2020) “UK coronavirus live: excess deaths reached almost 55,000 in early May, says ONS”. The Guardian; Available at https://www.theguardian.com/world/live/2020/may/19/uk-coronavirus-live-latest-updates [Accessed 19 May 2020].

Sample, I. (18 May 2020) “Over three-quarters of BAME doctors fear they will contract Covid-19”. The Guardian; Available at https://www.theguardian.com/society/2020/may/18/over-three-quarters-of-bame-doctors-fear-they-will-contract-covid-19 [Accessed 19 May 2020].

Seacole, M. (2003)[1857] Wonderful Adventures of Mrs. Seacole in Many Lands, via Project Gutenberg. Available at http://www.gutenberg.org/files/23031/23031-h/23031-h.htm [Accessed 19 May 2020].

Photograph of Mary Seacole c.1873, unknown photographer, Maull & Company London, via Wikimedia Commons, available at https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Seacole_photo.jpg [Accessed 19 May 2020].

The Lockdown Chronicles is a series of periodical comic strips made at night (in candlelight!) adapting and reusing openly-licensed or public domain items from online digital collections. Publication and tweetage are scheduled in advance. Historical sources are adapted and updated for the current pandemic; please refer to each strip’s references on each post for further context.  Catch up with the series at https://epriego.blog/tag/the-lockdown-chronicles/.